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Albany Divorce & Family Law Lawyer, New York


Stephen Louis Rockmacher Lawyer

Stephen Louis Rockmacher

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Immigration, Real Estate, Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Traffic

Stephen Rockmacher has over 25 years experience concentrating but not limited to Immigration, Real Estate, Criminal and Family law cases. He is focuse... (more)

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Kevin Michael Colwell

Family Law, Banking & Finance, Wills & Probate, Corporate, Constitutional Law
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William J. Dreyer

Criminal, Estate Planning, Family Law, Federal, Grand Jury Proceedings
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Kelly L. Malloy-Pogoda

Commercial Real Estate, Conveyancing, Divorce, Residential Real Estate, Title Insurance
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Mary Theresa Colwell

Family Law, Banking & Finance, Wills & Probate, Constitutional Law, Premises Liability
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Carolyn Snyder Lemmon

Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support, Farms, Divorce, Freedom of Information
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April M. Dalbec

Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Accident & Injury
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Gloria Arroyo Copland

Family Law, Real Estate, Adoption, Personal Injury, Divorce
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Christopher N. Luhn

Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Family Law, Accident & Injury, Personal Injury
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Michael E Cusack

Business Organization, Contract, Environmental Law, Estate Planning, Family Law
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LEGAL TERMS

NEXT OF KIN

The closest relatives, as defined by state law, of a deceased person. Most states recognize the spouse and the nearest blood relatives as next of kin.

FOSTER CHILD

A child placed by a government agency or a court in the care of someone other than his or her natural parents. Foster children may be removed from their family ... (more...)
A child placed by a government agency or a court in the care of someone other than his or her natural parents. Foster children may be removed from their family home because of parental abuse or neglect. Occasionally, parents voluntarily place their children in foster care. See foster care.

INCURABLE INSANITY

A legal reason for obtaining either a fault divorce or a no-fault divorce. It is rarely used, however, because of the difficulty of proving both the insanity of... (more...)
A legal reason for obtaining either a fault divorce or a no-fault divorce. It is rarely used, however, because of the difficulty of proving both the insanity of the spouse being divorced and that the insanity is incurable.

SOLE CUSTODY

An arrangement whereby only one parent has physical and legal custody of a child and the other parent has visitation rights.

NO-FAULT DIVORCE

Any divorce in which the spouse who wants to split up does not have to accuse the other of wrongdoing, but can simply state that the couple no longer gets along... (more...)
Any divorce in which the spouse who wants to split up does not have to accuse the other of wrongdoing, but can simply state that the couple no longer gets along. Until no-fault divorce arrived in the 1970s, the only way a person could get a divorce was to prove that the other spouse was at fault for the marriage not working. No-fault divorces are usually granted for reasons such as incompatibility, irreconcilable differences, or irretrievable or irremediable breakdown of the marriage. Also, some states allow incurable insanity as a basis for a no-fault divorce. Compare fault divorce.

FMLA

See Family and Medical Leave Act.

MISREPRESENTATION

A lie by one spouse before marriage that provides grounds for an annulment. For example, if a spouse failed to mention that he was still married or was incapabl... (more...)
A lie by one spouse before marriage that provides grounds for an annulment. For example, if a spouse failed to mention that he was still married or was incapable of having children, he has misrepresented himself.

UNCONTESTED DIVORCE

A divorce automatically granted by a court when the spouse who is served with a summons and complaint for divorce fails to file a formal response with the court... (more...)
A divorce automatically granted by a court when the spouse who is served with a summons and complaint for divorce fails to file a formal response with the court. Many divorces proceed this way when the spouses have worked everything out and there's no reason for both to go to court -- and pay the court costs.

BRIEF

A document used to submit a legal contention or argument to a court. A brief typically sets out the facts of the case and a party's argument as to why she shoul... (more...)
A document used to submit a legal contention or argument to a court. A brief typically sets out the facts of the case and a party's argument as to why she should prevail. These arguments must be supported by legal authority and precedent, such as statutes, regulations and previous court decisions. Although it is usually possible to submit a brief to a trial court (called a trial brief), briefs are most commonly used as a central part of the appeal process (an appellate brief). But don't be fooled by the name -- briefs are usually anything but brief, as pointed out by writer Franz Kafka, who defined a lawyer as 'a person who writes a 10,000 word decision and calls it a brief.'