Alpharetta Bankruptcy & Debt Lawyer, Georgia

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Ronald  Baker Lawyer

Ronald Baker

VERIFIED
Intellectual Property, Business, DUI-DWI, Bankruptcy & Debt, Personal Injury

Ronald Baker is a practicing lawyer in the state of Georgia, District Courts of Colorado, with District of Columbia (DC) Pending.

Brian Clark Near Lawyer

Brian Clark Near

VERIFIED
Bankruptcy & Debt, Business, Accident & Injury, Estate

Brian Near began his legal practice in 1989 with a law firm located in the former IBM Tower (One Atlantic Center) in midtown Atlanta. He later moved h... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-893-2701

Evan M. Altman Lawyer

Evan M. Altman

VERIFIED
Medical Malpractice, Bankruptcy, Business, Estate
Georgia

Mr. Altman concentrates his practice in the areas of bankruptcy, corporate law, personal injury, medical malpractice, product liability and general li... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-974-1130

Schuyler  Elliott Lawyer

Schuyler Elliott

VERIFIED
Foreclosure, Lawsuit & Dispute, Bankruptcy & Debt

Schuyler Elliott began practicing law in 1993 and is an experienced consumer advocate and trial attorney. Mr. Elliott exemplified his knowledge having... (more)

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CONTACT

800-947-2391

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John G. Walrath Lawyer

John G. Walrath

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Bankruptcy & Debt, Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Estate
General Practice Attorney in Metro Atlanta

The Law Offices of John G. Walrath is a small, aggressive and experienced Georgia law firm handling both civil and criminal cases throughout the State... (more)

Dorothy B Rosenberger

Estate Planning, Family Law, Corporate, Collection
Status:  In Good Standing           

Meghan Ryan Noblett

Litigation, Wills & Probate, Family Law, Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Mark G. Hatton

Bankruptcy, Corporate, Construction, Foreclosure
Status:  In Good Standing           

Benjamin Rachelson

Construction, Corporate, Business Organization, Credit & Debt
Status:  In Good Standing           

Ira L. Rachelson

Construction, Corporate, Banking & Finance, Credit & Debt
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Lawyer.com can help you easily and quickly find Alpharetta Bankruptcy & Debt Lawyers and Alpharetta Bankruptcy & Debt Law Firms. Refine your search by specific Bankruptcy & Debt practice areas such as Bankruptcy, Collection, Credit & Debt, Reorganization and Workout matters.

LEGAL TERMS

ABUSE

Misuse of the Chapter 7 bankruptcy remedy. This term is typically applied to Chapter 7 bankruptcy filings that should have been filed under Chapter 13, because ... (more...)
Misuse of the Chapter 7 bankruptcy remedy. This term is typically applied to Chapter 7 bankruptcy filings that should have been filed under Chapter 13, because the debtor appears to have enough disposable income to fund a Chapter 13 repayment plan.

COLLATERAL

Property that guarantees payment of a secured debt.

LIQUIDATING PARTNER

The member of an insolvent or dissolving partnership responsible for paying the debts and settling the accounts of the partnership.

IRS EXPENSES

A table of national and regional expense estimates published by the IRS. Debtors whose current monthly income is more than their state's median family income mu... (more...)
A table of national and regional expense estimates published by the IRS. Debtors whose current monthly income is more than their state's median family income must use the IRS expenses to calculate their average net income in a Chapter 7 case, or their disposable income in a Chapter 13 case.

NUISANCE FEES

Money charged by some credit card companies to increase their profits when you fail to use the card the way the creditor wants. Examples include late payment fe... (more...)
Money charged by some credit card companies to increase their profits when you fail to use the card the way the creditor wants. Examples include late payment fees, inactivity fees and fees for not carrying a balance from month to month. It's best to shop around and get rid of cards that have these fees attached.

FAIR CREDIT REPORTING ACT (FCRA)

A federal law that is designed to prevent inaccurate or obsolete information from entering or remaining in a credit report. The law requires credit bureaus to a... (more...)
A federal law that is designed to prevent inaccurate or obsolete information from entering or remaining in a credit report. The law requires credit bureaus to adopt reasonable procedures for gathering, maintaining and disseminating information and bars credit bureaus from reporting negative information that is older than seven years, except a bankruptcy, which may be reported for ten. If you notify a credit bureau of an error in your credit report, the FCRA requires the bureau to investigate your allegations within 30 days, review all information you provide, remove inaccurate and unverified information and adopt procedures to keep the information from reappearing. In addition, the law requires that creditors refrain from reporting incorrect information to credit bureaus.

CYBERSQUATTING

Buying a domain name that reflects the name of a business or famous person with the intent of selling the name back to the business or celebrity for a profit. T... (more...)
Buying a domain name that reflects the name of a business or famous person with the intent of selling the name back to the business or celebrity for a profit. The Anticybersquatting Consumer Protection Act of 1999 authorizes a cybersquatting victim to file a federal lawsuit to regain a domain name or sue for financial compensation. Under the act, registering, selling or using a domain name with the intent to profit from someone else's good name is considered cybersquatting. Victims of cybersquatting can also use the provisions of the Uniform Domain Name Dispute Resolution Policy adopted by ICANN, an international tribunal administering domain names. This international policy results in arbitration of the dispute, not litigation.

BULK SALES LAW

A law that regulates the transfer of business assets so that business owners cannot dispose of assets in order to avoid creditors. If a business owner wants to ... (more...)
A law that regulates the transfer of business assets so that business owners cannot dispose of assets in order to avoid creditors. If a business owner wants to conduct a bulk sale of business assets -- that is, get rid of an unusually large amount of inventory, merchandise or equipment -- the business owner must typically publish a notice of the sale and give written notice to creditors. Then, the owner must set up an account to hold the funds from the sale for a brief period of time during which creditors may make claims against the money. The prohibition against bulk sales is spelled out in the Uniform Commercial Code -- and laws modeled on the UCC have been generally adopted throughout the country.

TRADE DRESS

The distinctive packaging or design of a product that promotes the product and distinguishes it from other products in the marketplace -- for example, the shape... (more...)
The distinctive packaging or design of a product that promotes the product and distinguishes it from other products in the marketplace -- for example, the shape of Frangelico liqueur bottles. Trade dress can be protected under trademark law if a showing can be made that the average consumer would likely be confused as to product origin if another product were allowed to appear in similar dress.