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Boulder Estate Planning Lawyer, Colorado


Includes: Gift Taxation

Robert A. Schuetze

Leisure, Estate Planning, Family Law, Litigation, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

Kevin McDowell

Bankruptcy, Estate Planning, Family Law, Litigation, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Brent Warkentine

Child Support, Farms, Divorce, Estate Planning, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Lee D. Warkentine

Child Support, Farms, Divorce, Estate Planning, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Anne B. Jorgensen

Wills & Probate, Corporate, Elder Law, Estate Planning, Tax
Status:  In Good Standing           

Alex Goiran

Agriculture, Corporate, Business Organization, Estate Planning, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

John W. Gaddis

Corporate, Divorce, Estate Administration, Estate Planning, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Eve I. Canfield

Corporate, Estate Planning, Family Law, Litigation, Real Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Anton V. Dworak

Corporate, Estate Administration, Estate Planning, Real Estate, Tax
Status:  In Good Standing           

Chad A. Kupper

Corporate, Education, Estate Planning, Real Estate, Trusts
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

GRANT DEED

A deed containing an implied promise that the person transfering the property actually owns the title and that it is not encumbered in any way, except as descri... (more...)
A deed containing an implied promise that the person transfering the property actually owns the title and that it is not encumbered in any way, except as described in the deed. This is the most commonly used type of deed. Compare quitclaim deed.

EXEMPTION TRUST

A bypass trust funded with an amount no larger than the personal federal estate tax exemption in the year of death. If the trust grantor leaves property worth m... (more...)
A bypass trust funded with an amount no larger than the personal federal estate tax exemption in the year of death. If the trust grantor leaves property worth more than that amount, it usually goes to the surviving spouse. The trust property passes free from estate tax because of the personal exemption, and the rest is shielded from tax under the surviving spouse's marital deduction.

QDOT TRUST

A trust used to postpone estate tax when more than the amount of the personal federal estate tax exemption is left to a non-U.S. citizen spouse by the other spo... (more...)
A trust used to postpone estate tax when more than the amount of the personal federal estate tax exemption is left to a non-U.S. citizen spouse by the other spouse. QDOT stands for qualified domestic trust.

TRUST CORPUS

Latin for 'the body' of the trust. This term refers to all the property transferred to a trust. For example, if a trust is established (funded) with $250,000, t... (more...)
Latin for 'the body' of the trust. This term refers to all the property transferred to a trust. For example, if a trust is established (funded) with $250,000, that money is the corpus. Sometimes the trust corpus is known as the 'res,' a Latin word meaning 'thing.'

GRANTOR

Someone who creates a trust. Also called a trustor or settlor.

GROSS ESTATE

For federal estate tax filing purposes, the total of all property owned at death, without regard to any debts or liens against the property or the costs of prob... (more...)
For federal estate tax filing purposes, the total of all property owned at death, without regard to any debts or liens against the property or the costs of probate. Taxes are due only on the value of the property the person actually owned (the net estate) plus the amount of any taxable gifts made during life. In a few states, the gross estate is used when computing attorney fees for probating estates; the lawyer gets a percentage of the gross estate.

STATUTORY SHARE

The portion of a deceased person's estate that a spouse is entitled to claim under state law. The statutory share is usually one-third or one-half of the deceas... (more...)
The portion of a deceased person's estate that a spouse is entitled to claim under state law. The statutory share is usually one-third or one-half of the deceased spouse's property, but in some states the exact amount of the spouse's share depends on whether or not the couple has young children and, in a few states, on how long the couple was married. In most states, if the deceased spouse left a will, the surviving spouse must choose either what the will provides or the statutory share. Sometimes the statutory share is known by its more arcane legal name, dower and curtesy, or as a forced or elective share.

BENEFICIARY

A person or organization legally entitled to receive benefits through a legal device, such as a will, trust or life insurance policy.

AUGMENTED ESTATE

In general terms, an augmented estate consists of property owned by both a deceased person and his or her spouse. The concept of the augmented estate is used on... (more...)
In general terms, an augmented estate consists of property owned by both a deceased person and his or her spouse. The concept of the augmented estate is used only in some states. Its value is calculated only if a surviving spouse declines whatever he or she was left by will and instead claims a share of the deceased spouse's estate. (This is called taking against the will.) The amount of this 'statutory share' or 'elective share' depends on state law.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

People v. Mason

... sanction. • In October 2001, Respondent was suspended for one year and one day for violating Colo. RPC 1.1, 1.5(a), and 5.3(b) after he conducted an estate-planning seminar for the purpose of avoiding "rest" homecare costs. 148 ...

People v. Foster

... We consider in aggravation that Respondent has been licensed for over twenty years in Colorado. We note, however, that Respondent's background and experience is in estate planning and tax law, not domestic relations law. Absence of a Prior Disciplinary Record — 9.32(b): ...