Toronto Trusts Lawyer, Ontario


Caryma F Sa'd Lawyer

Caryma F Sa'd

VERIFIED
Criminal, Civil & Human Rights
Caryma Sa’d practices law in the Greater Toronto Areaand beyond.

A major component of Caryma’s current work involves advocacy with respect to human rights and social justice issues. She writes and tweets extensive... (more)

Marcus Peter McCann Lawyer

Marcus Peter McCann

VERIFIED
Employment, Civil Rights, Non-profit

Marcus is a lawyer who practices in the areas of employment, human rights and administrative law. He has appeared before all levels of court in Ontari... (more)

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800-960-9280

Matthew Adam Friedberg Lawyer

Matthew Adam Friedberg

VERIFIED
Criminal, DUI-DWI, Felony, Motor Vehicle, White Collar Crime

Matthew Friedberg has been a criminal defence lawyer his entire career. He has successfully represented thousands of clients charged with every type o... (more)

John Edward Charles Hyde Lawyer

John Edward Charles Hyde

VERIFIED
Employment, Labor Law

John-Edward C. Hyde is a Partner and Chair of the Management-side Labour Group, at Hyde HR Law. John is one of only 22 lawyers in Canada, certified as... (more)

Matthew James Jeffery Lawyer

Matthew James Jeffery

VERIFIED
Immigration, Visa, Deportation
Certified as a Specialist in Immigration Law

Matthew Jeffery, Barrister & Solicitor, is a Canadian immigration lawyer based in Toronto, Canada. Mr. Jeffery specializes in all types of immigration... (more)

Noel Martin Gerald Daley Lawyer

Noel Martin Gerald Daley

Personal Injury, Medical Malpractice, Insurance, Civil Rights

Noel Daley's success in law has been clearly defined by his upbringing. Inspired by his mother, who put his brothers and him through law school, he ha... (more)

Richard J. Aitken Lawyer

Richard J. Aitken

VERIFIED
Criminal, DUI-DWI, Traffic, Felony, Misdemeanor

Our winning team of experienced Ontario criminal lawyers provides hope and real solutions to those charged with DUI, DWI, impaired driving or other cr... (more)

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CONTACT

800-814-0801

Jonathan  Mesiano-Crookston Lawyer

Jonathan Mesiano-Crookston

VERIFIED
Lawsuit & Dispute, Intellectual Property, Franchising, Business, Health Care

Jonathan Mesiano-Crookston (BScH Biochem, JD) is a partner with the boutique commercial litigation firm of Goldman Hine LLP and a registered patent an... (more)

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CONTACT

800-681-3730

Mihkel  Holmberg Lawyer

Mihkel Holmberg

VERIFIED
Corporate, Wills & Probate, Trusts, Wills

Mihkel Holmberg’s practice encompasses a broad range of business practice including the purchase and sale of businesses, corporate and commercial le... (more)

Trevor  Smith Lawyer

Trevor Smith

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Family Law, Child Custody, Child Support, Divorce
We help good people through difficult situations

I am a divorce and family law lawyer. I solve most of my clients' legal issues out of court. When court is necessary, though, I advocate my clients' r... (more)

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CONTACT

800-929-0821

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LEGAL TERMS

BEQUEATH

A legal term sometimes used in wills that means 'leave' -- for example, 'I bequeath my garden tools to my brother-in-law, Buster Jenkins.'

COUNTERCLAIM

A defendant's court papers that seek to reverse the thrust of the lawsuit by claiming that it was the plaintiff -- not the defendant -- who committed legal wron... (more...)
A defendant's court papers that seek to reverse the thrust of the lawsuit by claiming that it was the plaintiff -- not the defendant -- who committed legal wrongs, and that as a result it is the defendant who is entitled to money damages or other relief. Usually filed as part of the defendant's answer -- which also denies plaintiff's claims -- a counterclaim is commonly but not always based on the same events that form the basis of the plaintiff's complaint. For example, a defendant in an auto accident lawsuit might file a counterclaim alleging that it was really the plaintiff who caused the accident. In some states, the counterclaim has been replaced by a similar legal pleading called a cross-complaint. In other states and in federal court, where counterclaims are still used, a defendant must file any counterclaim that stems from the same events covered by the plaintiff's complaint or forever lose the right to do so. In still other states where counterclaims are used, they are not mandatory, meaning a defendant is free to raise a claim that it was really the plaintiff who was at fault either in a counterclaim or later as part of a separate lawsuit.

REMAINDERMAN

Someone who will inherit property in the future. For instance, if someone dies and leaves his home 'to Alma for life, and then to Barry,' Barry is a remainderma... (more...)
Someone who will inherit property in the future. For instance, if someone dies and leaves his home 'to Alma for life, and then to Barry,' Barry is a remainderman because he will inherit the home in the future, after Alma dies.

RESIDUARY ESTATE

The property that remains in a deceased person's estate after all specific gifts are made, and all debts, taxes, administrative fees, probate costs, and court c... (more...)
The property that remains in a deceased person's estate after all specific gifts are made, and all debts, taxes, administrative fees, probate costs, and court costs are paid. The residuary estate also includes any gifts under a will that fail or lapse. For example, Connie's will leaves her house and all its furnishings to Andrew, her VW bug to her friend Carl, and the remainder of her property (the residuary estate) to her sister Sara. She doesn't name any alternate beneficiaries. Carl dies before Connie. The VW bug becomes part of the residuary estate and passes to Sara, along with all of Connie's property other than the house and furnishings. Also called the residual estate or residue.

LIFE INSURANCE

A contract in which an insurance company agrees to pay money to a designated beneficiary upon the death of the policy holder. In exchange, the policyholder pays... (more...)
A contract in which an insurance company agrees to pay money to a designated beneficiary upon the death of the policy holder. In exchange, the policyholder pays a regularly scheduled fee, known as the insurance premiums. The purpose of life insurance is to provide financial support to those who survive the policyholder, such as family members or business partners. When the policyholder dies, the insurance proceeds pass to the beneficiaries free of probate, though they are counted for federal estate tax purposes. group life insurance Life insurance available through an employer or association that covers participating employees and members under one master insurance policy. Most group life insurance policies are term insurance policies, that terminate when the member or employee reaches a certain age or leaves the organization and do not accumulate any cash surrender value. term life insurance No-frills life insurance, with neither cash surrender value nor loan value (an amount that can be used as collateral for a loan). Term life insurance provides a pre-set amount of coverage if the policyholder dies during the period of time specified in the policy. Policyholders usually have the option to renew at the end of the term for the period of years specified in the policy. Unlike whole life insurance, premiums generally increase as the insured person gets older and the risk of death increases.universal life insurance A type of whole life insurance that offers some additional features and advantages. Like whole life insurance, universal life insurance accumulates cash value through investment of the premium payments. The unique feature of universal life insurance is that it has variable premiums, benefits and payment schedules, all of which are tied to market interest rates and the performance of the investment portfolio. Also, universal life plicies normally provide you with more consumer information. For example, you are told how much of your policy payments goes for insurance company overhead expenses, reserves and policy proceed payments, and how much is retained and invested for your savings. This information isn't usually provided with whole life policies.variable life insurance A type of whole life insurance in which the amount of death benefits varies, depending on the performance of investments. The insurance company places some or all of the fixed premium payments into an investment account; some companies let the insured person decide how the money is invested. The policyholder bears the risk of investment losses, though there is a guaranteed minimum benefit payment. One benefit of variable insurance is that interest and dividend income from the investment account is not taxed until it is paid out to the policyholder.variable universal life insurance A type of whole life insurance that provides greater potential for financial gain--and brings greater risks. Like universal life insurance, variable universal life insurance offers flexible premiums, payment schedules and benefits. But variable universal life policies are riskier because the premiums are invested in stocks, rather than more predictable money market accounts and bonds. Also called universal variable life insurance.whole life insurance Life insurance that provides coverage for the entire life of the policyholder, who pays the same fixed premium throughout his or her life. The policy builds up cash reserves that may be paid out to the policyholder when he or she surrenders or partially surrenders the policy or uses the cash reserves to fund low-interest loans. The annual increase in the cash value of the policy is not taxed. If the policyholder surrenders the policy, a portion of the payment is not taxable. Also called straight life insurance or ordinary life insurance.

AB TRUST

A trust that allows couples to reduce or avoid estate taxes. Each spouse puts his or her property in an AB trust. When the first spouse dies, his or her half of... (more...)
A trust that allows couples to reduce or avoid estate taxes. Each spouse puts his or her property in an AB trust. When the first spouse dies, his or her half of the property goes to the beneficiaries named in the trust -- commonly, the grown children of the couple -- with the crucial condition that the surviving spouse has the right to use the property for life and is entitled to any income it generates. The surviving spouse may even be allowed to spend principal in certain circumstances. When the surviving spouse dies, the property passes to the trust beneficiaries. It is not considered part of the second spouse's estate for estate tax purposes. Using this kind of trust keeps the second spouse's taxable estate half the size it would be if the property were left directly to the spouse. This type of trust is also known as a bypass or credit shelter trust.

KINDRED

Under some state's probate codes, all relatives of a deceased person.

PERSONAL PROPERTY

All property other than land and buildings attached to land. Cars, bank accounts, wages, securities, a small business, furniture, insurance policies, jewelry, p... (more...)
All property other than land and buildings attached to land. Cars, bank accounts, wages, securities, a small business, furniture, insurance policies, jewelry, patents, pets and season baseball tickets are all examples of personal property. Personal property may also be called personal effects, movable property, goods and chattel, and personalty. Compare real estate.

HOLOGRAPHIC WILL

A will that is completely handwritten, dated and signed by the person making it. Holographic wills are generally not witnessed. Although it's legal in many stat... (more...)
A will that is completely handwritten, dated and signed by the person making it. Holographic wills are generally not witnessed. Although it's legal in many states, making a holographic will is never advised except as a last resort.