Centralia Estate Lawyer, Missouri


Tom  Luckenbill Lawyer

Tom Luckenbill

VERIFIED
Estate Planning, Wills & Probate, Trusts, Elder Law

Tom Luckenbill is the principal attorney at Luckenbill Law Firm, LLC and has over twenty-two years of experience as a practicing attorney and financi... (more)

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CONTACT

573-886-8940

Erick S. Creach

Corporate, Business Organization, Contract, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           

Timothy C. Harlan

Social Security -- Disability, Wills & Probate, Government Agencies
Status:  In Good Standing           

Merritt Miller Beck III

Elder Law, Consumer Rights, Wills & Probate, Municipal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  42 Years
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Merritt Miller Beck

Corporate, Elder Law, Estate Planning, International Tax
Status:  In Good Standing           

Randal Jay Owings

Landlord-Tenant, International Tax, Estate Planning, Elder Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  25 Years

Randall P. Baker

Estate Planning, Workers' Compensation, Child Custody, Medical Malpractice
Status:  In Good Standing           

Jonathan Levi Witte

Juvenile Law, Traffic, Estate Planning, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Louis J. Leonatti

Wills & Probate, Estate Planning, Corporate, Accident & Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

Louis J. Leonatti

Power of Attorney, Estate Planning, Business, Car Accident
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  47 Years

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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Lawyer.com can help you easily and quickly find Centralia Estate Lawyers and Centralia Estate Law Firms. Refine your search by specific Estate practice areas such as Estate Planning, Trusts, Wills & Probate and Power of Attorney matters.

LEGAL TERMS

CURATOR

See conservator.

SPECIAL ADMINISTRATOR

(1) In the law of wills and estates, a person appointed by the court to take charge of only a designated portion of an estate during probate. For example, a spe... (more...)
(1) In the law of wills and estates, a person appointed by the court to take charge of only a designated portion of an estate during probate. For example, a special administrator with particular expertise on art might be appointed to oversee the probate of a wealthy person's art collection, but not the entire estate. (2) A person appointed to be responsible for a deceased person's property for a limited time or during an emergency, such as a challenge to the will or to the qualifications of the named executor. In such cases, the special administrator's duty is to maintain and preserve the estate, not necessarily to take control of the probate process

GROSS ESTATE

For federal estate tax filing purposes, the total of all property owned at death, without regard to any debts or liens against the property or the costs of prob... (more...)
For federal estate tax filing purposes, the total of all property owned at death, without regard to any debts or liens against the property or the costs of probate. Taxes are due only on the value of the property the person actually owned (the net estate) plus the amount of any taxable gifts made during life. In a few states, the gross estate is used when computing attorney fees for probating estates; the lawyer gets a percentage of the gross estate.

LAPSE

Under a will, the failure of a gift of property. A gift lapses when the beneficiary dies before the person who made the will, and no alternate has been named. S... (more...)
Under a will, the failure of a gift of property. A gift lapses when the beneficiary dies before the person who made the will, and no alternate has been named. Some states have anti-lapse statutes, which prevent gifts to relatives of the deceased person from lapsing unless the relative has no heirs of his or her own. A lapsed gift becomes part of the residuary estate.

GRANTOR RETAINED INCOME TRUST

Irrevocable trusts designed to save on estate tax. There are several kinds; with all of them, you keep income from trust property, or use of that property, for ... (more...)
Irrevocable trusts designed to save on estate tax. There are several kinds; with all of them, you keep income from trust property, or use of that property, for a period of years. When the trust ends, the property goes to the final beneficiaries you've named. These trusts are for people who have enough wealth to feel comfortable giving away a substantial hunk of property. They come in three flavors: Grantor-Retained Annuity Trusts (GRATs), Grantor-Retained Unitrusts (GRUTs) and Grantor-Retained Income Trusts (GRITs).

NET ESTATE

The value of all property owned at death less liabilities or debts.

PROBATE COURT

A specialized court or division of a state trial court that considers only cases concerning the distribution of deceased persons' estate. Called 'surrogate cour... (more...)
A specialized court or division of a state trial court that considers only cases concerning the distribution of deceased persons' estate. Called 'surrogate court' in New York and several other states, this court normally examines the authenticity of a will -- or if a person dies intestate, figures out who receives her property under state law. It then oversees a procedure to pay the deceased person's debts and to distribute her assets to the proper inheritors. See probate.

SURROGATE COURT

See probate court.

ABATEMENT

A reduction. After a death, abatement occurs if the deceased person didn't leave enough property to fulfill all the bequests made in the will and meet other exp... (more...)
A reduction. After a death, abatement occurs if the deceased person didn't leave enough property to fulfill all the bequests made in the will and meet other expenses. Gifts left in the will are cut back in order to pay taxes, satisfy debts or take care of other gifts that are given priority under law or by the will itself.