Saint Louis Estate Lawyer, Missouri


Julia L. Gray Lawyer

Julia L. Gray

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Lawsuit & Dispute, Traffic
Mediator and general practice of law, focusing on

Serving clients throughout the great state of Missouri, we offer video conferencing and telephone appointments. We meet with clients at our Clayton an... (more)

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CONTACT

800-886-5981

Keya Michele Reed Lawyer

Keya Michele Reed

VERIFIED
Criminal, Family Law, Estate, Estate Planning, Power of Attorney
Address Is For Mailing Only

Keya is passionate about helping and pursuing justice for all whose legal rights often have been inadequately pursued. As demonstrated by her role as ... (more)

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CONTACT

800-890-5181

Joseph Robert Burcke Lawyer

Joseph Robert Burcke

VERIFIED
Estate, Wills & Probate, Guardianships & Conservatorships, Divorce, Business Organization

Joseph R. Burcke is a St. Louis, Missouri based attorney whose practice focuses upon estate planning issues, including representation of disabled indi... (more)

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CONTACT

800-749-2231

Frank J. Niesen, III Lawyer

Frank J. Niesen, III

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Workers' Compensation, Motor Vehicle, Social Security, Estate

I am married with three children. I am a native St. Louisan who enjoys watching sports, playing golf, and hunting. My family and I are members of St. ... (more)

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CONTACT

314-421-5800

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Thomas John Barklage Lawyer

Thomas John Barklage

VERIFIED
Estate, Wills & Probate, Trusts, Business, Real Estate

Thomas Barklage, received an undergraduate degree in Political Science from the University of Missouri-Columbia in 1972 and his law degree (cum laude)... (more)

Travis W. T. Grafe Lawyer

Travis W. T. Grafe

VERIFIED
Criminal, Accident & Injury, Motor Vehicle, Estate
We Help People Who Are Charged With Crimes

Travis W. T. Grafe was born and raised in Belleville, Illinois, where he graduated from Belleville Township High School West in 1995. Mr. Grafe attend... (more)

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CONTACT

800-970-7201

Melissa G. Nolan

Deportation, Gift Taxation, Elder Law, Asylum
Status:  In Good Standing           

Charles D. Sindel

Credit & Debt, Family Law, Personal Injury, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Cynthia C. Bottini

Estate Planning, Guardianships & Conservatorships, Living Wills, Power of Attorney
Status:  In Good Standing           

Richard A. Yawitz

Banking & Finance, Corporate, Business Organization, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Lawyer.com can help you easily and quickly find Saint Louis Estate Lawyers and Saint Louis Estate Law Firms. Refine your search by specific Estate practice areas such as Estate Planning, Trusts, Wills & Probate and Power of Attorney matters.

LEGAL TERMS

BANKRUPTCY ESTATE

All of the property you own when you file for bankruptcy, except for most pensions and educational trusts. The trustee technically takes control of your bankrup... (more...)
All of the property you own when you file for bankruptcy, except for most pensions and educational trusts. The trustee technically takes control of your bankruptcy estate for the duration of your case.

KINDRED

Under some state's probate codes, all relatives of a deceased person.

COUNTERCLAIM

A defendant's court papers that seek to reverse the thrust of the lawsuit by claiming that it was the plaintiff -- not the defendant -- who committed legal wron... (more...)
A defendant's court papers that seek to reverse the thrust of the lawsuit by claiming that it was the plaintiff -- not the defendant -- who committed legal wrongs, and that as a result it is the defendant who is entitled to money damages or other relief. Usually filed as part of the defendant's answer -- which also denies plaintiff's claims -- a counterclaim is commonly but not always based on the same events that form the basis of the plaintiff's complaint. For example, a defendant in an auto accident lawsuit might file a counterclaim alleging that it was really the plaintiff who caused the accident. In some states, the counterclaim has been replaced by a similar legal pleading called a cross-complaint. In other states and in federal court, where counterclaims are still used, a defendant must file any counterclaim that stems from the same events covered by the plaintiff's complaint or forever lose the right to do so. In still other states where counterclaims are used, they are not mandatory, meaning a defendant is free to raise a claim that it was really the plaintiff who was at fault either in a counterclaim or later as part of a separate lawsuit.

DISINHERIT

To deliberately prevent someone from inheriting something. This is usually done by a provision in a will stating that someone who would ordinarily inherit prope... (more...)
To deliberately prevent someone from inheriting something. This is usually done by a provision in a will stating that someone who would ordinarily inherit property -- a close family member, for example -- should not receive it. In most states, you cannot completely disinherit your spouse; a surviving spouse has the right to claim a portion (usually one-third to one-half) of the deceased spouse's estate. With a few exceptions, however, you can expressly disinherit children.

ALTERNATE BENEFICIARY

A person, organization or institution that receives property through a will, trust or insurance policy when the first named beneficiary is unable or refuses to ... (more...)
A person, organization or institution that receives property through a will, trust or insurance policy when the first named beneficiary is unable or refuses to take the property. For example, in his will Jake leaves his collection of sheet music to his daughter, Mia, and names the local symphony as alternate beneficiary. When Jake dies, Mia decides that the symphony can make better use of the sheet music than she can, so she refuses (disclaims) the gift, and the manuscripts pass directly to the symphony. In insurance law, the alternate beneficiary, usually the person who receives the insurance proceeds because the initial or primary beneficiary has died, is called the secondary or contingent beneficiary.

LIVING TRUST

A trust you can set up during your life. Living trusts are an excellent way to avoid the cost and hassle of probate because the property you transfer into the t... (more...)
A trust you can set up during your life. Living trusts are an excellent way to avoid the cost and hassle of probate because the property you transfer into the trust during your life passes directly to the trust beneficiaries after you die, without court involvement. The successor trustee--the person you appoint to handle the trust after your death--simply transfers ownership to the beneficiaries you named in the trust. Living trusts are also called 'inter vivos trusts.'

SPENDTHRIFT TRUST

A trust created for a beneficiary the grantor considers irresponsible about money. The trustee keeps control of the trust income, doling out money to the benefi... (more...)
A trust created for a beneficiary the grantor considers irresponsible about money. The trustee keeps control of the trust income, doling out money to the beneficiary as needed, and sometimes paying third parties (creditors, for example) on the beneficiary's behalf, bypassing the beneficiary completely. Spendthrift trusts typically contain a provision prohibiting creditors from seizing the trust fund to satisfy the beneficiary's debts. These trusts are legal in most states, even though creditors hate them.

INVESTOR

A person who makes investments. An investor may act either for herself or on behalf of others. A stock broker or mutual fund manager, for instance, makes invest... (more...)
A person who makes investments. An investor may act either for herself or on behalf of others. A stock broker or mutual fund manager, for instance, makes investments for others who have entrusted her with their money.

PER STIRPES

Under a will, a method of determining who inherits property when a joint beneficiary has died before the willmaker, leaving living children of his or her own. F... (more...)
Under a will, a method of determining who inherits property when a joint beneficiary has died before the willmaker, leaving living children of his or her own. For example, Fred leaves his house jointly to his son Alan and his daughter Julie. But Alan dies before Fred, leaving two young children. If Fred's will states that heirs of a deceased beneficiary are to receive the property 'per stirpes,' Julie will receive one-half of the property, and Alan's two children will share his half in equal shares (through Alan by right of representation). If, on the other hand, Fred's will states that the property is to be divided per capita, Julie and the two grandchildren will each take a third.

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