Ask A Lawyer

Tell Us Your Case Information for Fastest Lawyer Match!

Please include all relevant details from your case including where, when, and who it involoves.
Case details that can effectively describe the legal situation while also staying concise generally receive the best responses from lawyers.


By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided may not be privileged or confidential.

Charlotte Foreclosure Lawyer, North Carolina


James C. Hord Lawyer

James C. Hord

VERIFIED
Bankruptcy & Debt, Tax, Foreclosure, Government Agencies
Because you need someone on YOUR side.

James C. Hord has been an established bankruptcy attorney in Charlotte, North Carolina, since 1980, where he has used his experience and knowledge to ... (more)

Sean Dillenbeck

Bankruptcy & Debt, Foreclosure, Visa, Income Tax
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  9 Years

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Paolo Malachi Newman

Bankruptcy & Debt, Foreclosure, Credit & Debt, Consumer Bankruptcy, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           
Speak with Lawyer.com

Maria M. Satterfield

Estate Planning, Estate Administration, Real Estate, Foreclosure
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  8 Years

James Spielberger

Foreclosure, Business, Employment, Consumer Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           

Bess Harris

Foreclosure, Personal Injury, Lending, Gay & Lesbian Rights
Status:  In Good Standing           

David W. Neill

Foreclosure, Election & Political, Collection, Litigation
Status:  In Good Standing           

Rick D. Lail

Foreclosure, Personal Injury, Dispute Resolution, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           

David A. Grassi

Civil Rights, Litigation, Collection, Foreclosure
Status:  In Good Standing           

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided may not be privileged or confidential.


TIPS

Easily find Charlotte Foreclosure Lawyers and Charlotte Foreclosure Law Firms. For more attorneys, search all Real Estate areas including Timeshare, Construction, Eminent Domain, Land Use & Zoning, Landlord-Tenant and Other Real Estate attorneys.

LEGAL TERMS

INVITEE

A business guest, or someone who enters property held open to members of the public, such as a visitor to a museum. Property owners must protect invitees from d... (more...)
A business guest, or someone who enters property held open to members of the public, such as a visitor to a museum. Property owners must protect invitees from dangers on the property. In an example of the perversion of legalese, social guests that you invite into your home are called 'licensees.'

AGREEMENT

A meeting of the minds. An agreement is made when two people reach an understanding about a particular issue, including their obligations, duties and rights. Wh... (more...)
A meeting of the minds. An agreement is made when two people reach an understanding about a particular issue, including their obligations, duties and rights. While agreement is sometimes used to mean contract -- a legally binding oral or written agreement -- it is actually a broader term, including understandings that might not rise to the level of a legally binding contract.

ESCHEAT

The forfeit of all property to the state when a person dies without heirs.

APPRECIATION

An increase in value. Appreciated property is property that has gone up in value since it was acquired.

NUISANCE

Something that interferes with the use of property by being irritating, offensive, obstructive or dangerous. Nuisances include a wide range of conditions, every... (more...)
Something that interferes with the use of property by being irritating, offensive, obstructive or dangerous. Nuisances include a wide range of conditions, everything from a chemical plant's noxious odors to a neighbor's dog barking. The former would be a 'public nuisance,' one affecting many people, while the other would be a 'private nuisance,' limited to making your life difficult, unless the dog was bothering others. Lawsuits may be brought to abate (remove or reduce) a nuisance. See quiet enjoyment, attractive nuisance.

CONSTRUCTIVE EVICTION

When a landlord provides housing that is so substandard that a landlord has legally evicted the tenant. For example, if the landlord refuses to provide heat or ... (more...)
When a landlord provides housing that is so substandard that a landlord has legally evicted the tenant. For example, if the landlord refuses to provide heat or water or refuses to clean up an environmental health hazard, the tenant has the right to move out and stop paying rent, without incurring legal liability for breaking the lease.

CAUSE OF ACTION

A specific legal claim -- such as for negligence, breach of contract or medical malpractice -- for which a plaintiff seeks compensation. Each cause of action is... (more...)
A specific legal claim -- such as for negligence, breach of contract or medical malpractice -- for which a plaintiff seeks compensation. Each cause of action is divided into discrete elements, all of which must be proved to present a winning case.

RUNNING WITH THE LAND

A phrase used in property law to describe a right or duty that remains with a piece of property no matter who owns it. For example, the duty to allow a public b... (more...)
A phrase used in property law to describe a right or duty that remains with a piece of property no matter who owns it. For example, the duty to allow a public beach access path across waterfront property would most likely pass from one owner of the property to the next.

QUASI-COMMUNITY PROPERTY

A form of property owned by a married couple. If a couple moves to a community property state from a non-community property state, property they acquired togeth... (more...)
A form of property owned by a married couple. If a couple moves to a community property state from a non-community property state, property they acquired together in the non-community property state may be considered quasi-community property. Quasi-community property is treated just like community property when one spouse dies or if the couple divorces.