Cincinnati Felony Lawyer, Ohio


Roger  Bouchard Lawyer

Roger Bouchard

VERIFIED
DUI-DWI, Misdemeanor, Felony
Bouchard Law Office

Hi! I am Roger Pierre Bouchard. ➤ My credible history of success is directly related to extensive experience in assisting senior counsels, firm lea... (more)

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800-983-1160

Stephenie Nichole Lape Lawyer

Stephenie Nichole Lape

VERIFIED
Criminal, DUI-DWI, Misdemeanor, Felony

Stephenie Lape is the quintessential attorney. She is intelligent, extremely hardworking, and brutally honest. Stephenie comes from a long line of att... (more)

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513-621-8710

Matthew  Ernst Lawyer

Matthew Ernst

VERIFIED
DUI-DWI, Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Felony, Accident & Injury

Matthew Ernst, Attorney at Law offers the services of a tough, smart attorney who gets results for his criminal defense clients through forceful advoc... (more)

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513-647-1887

Bradley J. Groene Lawyer
Bradley J. Groene
is a Top Attorney Award winner at Attorney.com. Only 5% have the elite qualifications. Click the badge for more info.

Bradley J. Groene

Bradley J. Groene is a Top Attorney Award winner at Attorney.com. Only 5% have the elite qualifications. Click the badge for more info.
VERIFIED
Criminal, Felony, Misdemeanor, DUI-DWI, White Collar Crime

Cincinnati native Bradley J. Groene is a compassionate and industrious legal advocate who has been practicing law in the greater Cincinnati metropolit... (more)

Thomas P. Longano

Criminal, Felony, Sexual Harassment, White Collar Crime
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Richard R. Campbell

DUI-DWI, Misdemeanor, Felony, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  14 Years

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Gary Allen Billig

Bankruptcy, DUI-DWI, Divorce, Felony
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  49 Years

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James A. Whitaker

Wills & Probate, DUI-DWI, Felony, Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  52 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

DISCOVERY

A formal investigation -- governed by court rules -- that is conducted before trial. Discovery allows one party to question other parties, and sometimes witness... (more...)
A formal investigation -- governed by court rules -- that is conducted before trial. Discovery allows one party to question other parties, and sometimes witnesses. It also allows one party to force the others to produce requested documents or other physical evidence. The most common types of discovery are interrogatories, consisting of written questions the other party must answer under penalty of perjury, and depositions, which involve an in-person session at which one party to a lawsuit has the opportunity to ask oral questions of the other party or her witnesses under oath while a written transcript is made by a court reporter. Other types of pretrial discovery consist of written requests to produce documents and requests for admissions, by which one party asks the other to admit or deny key facts in the case. One major purpose of discovery is to assess the strength or weakness of an opponent's case, with the idea of opening settlement talks. Another is to gather information to use at trial. Discovery is also present in criminal cases, in which by law the prosecutor must turn over to the defense any witness statements and any evidence that might tend to exonerate the defendant. Depending on the rules of the court, the defendant may also be obliged to share evidence with the prosecutor.

PLEA BARGAIN

A negotiation between the defense and prosecution (and sometimes the judge) that settles a criminal case. The defendant typically pleads guilty to a lesser crim... (more...)
A negotiation between the defense and prosecution (and sometimes the judge) that settles a criminal case. The defendant typically pleads guilty to a lesser crime (or fewer charges) than originally charged, in exchange for a guaranteed sentence that is shorter than what the defendant could face if convicted at trial. The prosecution gets the certainty of a conviction and a known sentence; the defendant avoids the risk of a higher sentence; and the judge gets to move on to other cases.

ACQUITTAL

A decision by a judge or jury that a defendant in a criminal case is not guilty of a crime. An acquittal is not a finding of innocence; it is simply a conclusio... (more...)
A decision by a judge or jury that a defendant in a criminal case is not guilty of a crime. An acquittal is not a finding of innocence; it is simply a conclusion that the prosecution has not proved its case beyond a reasonable doubt.

FEDERAL COURT

A branch of the United States government with power derived directly from the U.S. Constitution. Federal courts decide cases involving the U.S. Constitution, fe... (more...)
A branch of the United States government with power derived directly from the U.S. Constitution. Federal courts decide cases involving the U.S. Constitution, federal law--for example, patents, federal taxes, labor law and federal crimes, such as robbing a federally chartered bank--and cases where the parties are from different states and are involved in a dispute for $75,000 or more.

ACTUS REUS

Latin for a 'guilty act.' The actus reus is the act which, in combination with a certain mental state, such as intent or recklessness, constitutes a crime. For ... (more...)
Latin for a 'guilty act.' The actus reus is the act which, in combination with a certain mental state, such as intent or recklessness, constitutes a crime. For example, the crime of theft requires physically taking something (the actus reus) coupled with the intent to permanently deprive the owner of the object (the mental state, or mens rea).

PROSECUTOR

A lawyer who works for the local, state or federal government to bring and litigate criminal cases.

ARREST

A situation in which the police detain a person in a manner that, to any reasonable person, makes it clear she is not free to leave. A person can be 'under arre... (more...)
A situation in which the police detain a person in a manner that, to any reasonable person, makes it clear she is not free to leave. A person can be 'under arrest' even though the police have not announced it; nor are handcuffs or physical restraint necessary. Questioning an arrested person about her involvement in or knowledge of a crime must be preceded by the Miranda warnings if the police intend to use the answers against the person in a criminal case. If the arrested person chooses to remain silent, the questioning must stop.

BATTERY

A crime consisting of physical contact that is intended to harm someone. Unintentional harmful contact is not battery, no mater how careless the behavior or how... (more...)
A crime consisting of physical contact that is intended to harm someone. Unintentional harmful contact is not battery, no mater how careless the behavior or how severe the injury. A fist fight is a common battery; being hit by a wild pitch in a baseball game is not.

IMPEACH

(1) To discredit. To impeach a witness' credibility, for example, is to show that the witness is not believable. A witness may be impeached by showing that he h... (more...)
(1) To discredit. To impeach a witness' credibility, for example, is to show that the witness is not believable. A witness may be impeached by showing that he has made statements that are inconsistent with his present testimony, or that he has a reputation for not being a truthful person. (2) The process of charging a public official, such as the President or a federal judge, with a crime or misconduct and removing the official from office.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

State v. Kalish

... Kalish eventually pleaded guilty to aggravated vehicular homicide, a felony of the second degree, in violation of RC 2903.06(A)(2)(a), and driving with a prohibited concentration of alcohol in bodily substances, a misdemeanor of the first degree, in violation of RC 4511.19(A)(1 ...

State v. Veney

... appellee. MOYER, CJ. {¶ 1} Once again, we are asked to clarify the duties of the trial court in accepting pleas to felony charges and to determine the consequences of the trial court's failure to comply with Crim.R. 11. The first ...

State v. Clark

... {¶ 12} "(4) If the violation of the sanction is a felony, I may be prosecuted for the felony and, in addition to any sentence it imposes on me for the new felony, the Court may impose a prison term, subject to a specified maximum, for the violation." (Emphasis added.). ...