Doe Run Estate Lawyer, Missouri


Travis W. T. Grafe Lawyer

Travis W. T. Grafe

VERIFIED
Criminal, Workers' Compensation, Motor Vehicle, Estate
We Help People Who Are Charged With Crimes

Travis W. T. Grafe was born and raised in Belleville, Illinois, where he graduated from Belleville Township High School West in 1995. Mr. Grafe attend... (more)

Cira Renee Duffe

Bankruptcy, Family Law, Estate Planning, Traffic
Status:  In Good Standing           

James Ransford Joyce

Estate Planning, Adoption, Bankruptcy, Car Accident
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  23 Years

Clinton B. Roberts

Corporate, Estate Planning, Federal Trial Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Robert David Huelskamp

Estate Planning, Adoption, Bankruptcy, Medical Malpractice
Status:  In Good Standing           

Danielle Johnson

Construction, Wills & Probate, Business, Municipal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Kelli Marie Guilliams

Bankruptcy, Elder Law, Family Law, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  9 Years

Floyd T Norrick

Real Estate Other, Estate, Employment, Criminal, Business
Status:  In Good Standing           

Ajla Alunovic

Car Accident, Elder Law, Adoption, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  6 Years

Benjamin Eugene Thompson

Municipal, Estate Planning, Family Law, Car Accident
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  14 Years

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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Lawyer.com can help you easily and quickly find Doe Run Estate Lawyers and Doe Run Estate Law Firms. Refine your search by specific Estate practice areas such as Estate Planning, Trusts, Wills & Probate and Power of Attorney matters.

LEGAL TERMS

TRUSTEE

The person who manages assets owned by a trust under the terms of the trust document. A trustee's purpose is to safeguard the trust and distribute trust income ... (more...)
The person who manages assets owned by a trust under the terms of the trust document. A trustee's purpose is to safeguard the trust and distribute trust income or principal as directed in the trust document. With a simple probate-avoidance living trust, the person who creates the trust is also the trustee.

RESIDUARY BENEFICIARY

A person who receives any property by a will or trust that is not specifically left to another designated beneficiary. For example, if Antonio makes a will leav... (more...)
A person who receives any property by a will or trust that is not specifically left to another designated beneficiary. For example, if Antonio makes a will leaving his home to Edwina and the remainder of his property to Elmo, then Elmo is the residuary beneficiary.

TRUSTEE POWERS

The provisions in a trust document defining what the trustee may and may not do.

ADMINISTRATION (OF AN ESTATE)

The court-supervised distribution of the probate estate of a deceased person. If there is a will that names an executor, that person manages the distribution. I... (more...)
The court-supervised distribution of the probate estate of a deceased person. If there is a will that names an executor, that person manages the distribution. If not, the court appoints someone, who is generally known as the administrator. In some states, the person is called the 'personal representative' in either instance.

LAPSE

Under a will, the failure of a gift of property. A gift lapses when the beneficiary dies before the person who made the will, and no alternate has been named. S... (more...)
Under a will, the failure of a gift of property. A gift lapses when the beneficiary dies before the person who made the will, and no alternate has been named. Some states have anti-lapse statutes, which prevent gifts to relatives of the deceased person from lapsing unless the relative has no heirs of his or her own. A lapsed gift becomes part of the residuary estate.

POWER OF APPOINTMENT

The legal authority to decide who will receive someone else's property, usually property held in a trust. Most trustees can distribute the income from a trust o... (more...)
The legal authority to decide who will receive someone else's property, usually property held in a trust. Most trustees can distribute the income from a trust only according to the terms of the trust, but a trustee with a power of appointment can choose the beneficiaries, sometimes from a list of candidates specified by the grantor. For example, Karin creates a trust with power of appointment to benefit either the local art museum, symphony, library or park, depending on the trustee's assessment of need.

GENERATION-SKIPPING TRUST

A trust designed to save on estate tax. The trust principal is preserved for the trust maker's grandchildren, with his or her children receiving only income fro... (more...)
A trust designed to save on estate tax. The trust principal is preserved for the trust maker's grandchildren, with his or her children receiving only income from the trust. Because the children (the middle generation) never legally own the property, it isn't subject to estate tax at their death. See generation-skipping transfer tax.

SURROGATE COURT

See probate court.

FAMILY ALLOWANCE

A certain amount of a deceased person's money to which immediate family members are entitled at the beginning of the probate process. The allowance is meant to ... (more...)
A certain amount of a deceased person's money to which immediate family members are entitled at the beginning of the probate process. The allowance is meant to help support the surviving spouse and children during the time it takes to probate the estate. The amount is determined by state law and varies greatly from state to state.