Fort Worth Estate Lawyer, Texas


Curtis L Fortinberry Lawyer

Curtis L Fortinberry

VERIFIED
Criminal, Wills & Probate, Slip & Fall Accident, Personal Injury, Divorce & Family Law

Curtis L. Fortinberry practices in Criminal, Car Accident, Slip & Fall Accident, Personal Injury, Divorce & Family Law. He graduated from Taxes Wesley... (more)

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CONTACT

800-660-7051

Paul Francis Wieneskie Lawyer

Paul Francis Wieneskie

Administrative Law, State Appellate Practice, Wills, Business & Trade
Lin C. Morrisett Lawyer

Lin C. Morrisett

Estate, Wills & Probate, Trusts, Estate Planning, Wills
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Meda Clemmentine Bourland Lawyer

Meda Clemmentine Bourland

Family Law, Commercial Real Estate, Criminal, Wills
Brandy M Austin Lawyer

Brandy M Austin

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Accident & Injury, Criminal, Business, Estate
With 6 attorneys and a team of 17 people, we assist clients through the legal process.

Hello, my name is Brandy Austin. I am a general practice attorney and founder of the Brandy Austin Law Firm in Arlington, TX. My firm is known for its... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-945-2241

Dwain  Downing Lawyer

Dwain Downing

VERIFIED
Wills & Probate, Bankruptcy, Estate Planning, Divorce, Credit & Debt
Experienced and compassionate law firm

Hello, my name is Dwain Downing and if you are in need, I would like to be your attorney, To help you to know me a little better I would like to tell ... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-382-6050

Forrest W. Wagner Lawyer

Forrest W. Wagner

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Power of Attorney
Board certified in Family Law since December, 1988.

Forrest W. “Bill” Wagner is a family law attorney certified by the Texas Board of Legal Specialization as board certified in the area of family la... (more)

Andrew J. Anderson Lawyer

Andrew J. Anderson

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Divorce, Family Law, Wills
Providing prompt, aggressive legal advice for clients in the Dallas / Fort Worth Metroplex.

After practicing for almost a decade at well-respected Dallas law firms, Andrew J. Anderson decided to form Anderson Legal Group, P.C. The focus of t... (more)

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CONTACT

800-931-7141

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Lawyer.com can help you easily and quickly find Fort Worth Estate Lawyers and Fort Worth Estate Law Firms. Refine your search by specific Estate practice areas such as Estate Planning, Trusts, Wills & Probate and Power of Attorney matters.

LEGAL TERMS

TAKING AGAINST THE WILL

A procedure under state law that gives a surviving spouse the right to demand a certain share (usually one-third to one-half) of the deceased spouse's property.... (more...)
A procedure under state law that gives a surviving spouse the right to demand a certain share (usually one-third to one-half) of the deceased spouse's property. The surviving spouse can take that share instead of accepting whatever he or she inherited through the deceased spouse's will. If the surviving spouse decides to take the statutory share, it's called 'taking against the will.' Dower and curtesy is another name for the same legal process.

COUNTERCLAIM

A defendant's court papers that seek to reverse the thrust of the lawsuit by claiming that it was the plaintiff -- not the defendant -- who committed legal wron... (more...)
A defendant's court papers that seek to reverse the thrust of the lawsuit by claiming that it was the plaintiff -- not the defendant -- who committed legal wrongs, and that as a result it is the defendant who is entitled to money damages or other relief. Usually filed as part of the defendant's answer -- which also denies plaintiff's claims -- a counterclaim is commonly but not always based on the same events that form the basis of the plaintiff's complaint. For example, a defendant in an auto accident lawsuit might file a counterclaim alleging that it was really the plaintiff who caused the accident. In some states, the counterclaim has been replaced by a similar legal pleading called a cross-complaint. In other states and in federal court, where counterclaims are still used, a defendant must file any counterclaim that stems from the same events covered by the plaintiff's complaint or forever lose the right to do so. In still other states where counterclaims are used, they are not mandatory, meaning a defendant is free to raise a claim that it was really the plaintiff who was at fault either in a counterclaim or later as part of a separate lawsuit.

INTESTATE SUCCESSION

The method by which property is distributed when a person dies without a valid will. Each state's law provides that the property be distributed to the closest s... (more...)
The method by which property is distributed when a person dies without a valid will. Each state's law provides that the property be distributed to the closest surviving relatives. In most states, the surviving spouse, children, parents, siblings, nieces and nephews, and next of kin inherit, in that order.

INVENTORY

A complete listing of all property owned by a deceased person at the time of death. The inventory is filed with the court during probate. The executor or admini... (more...)
A complete listing of all property owned by a deceased person at the time of death. The inventory is filed with the court during probate. The executor or administrator of the estate is responsible for making and filing the inventory.

EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT INCOME SECURITY ACT OF 1974 (ERISA)

A federal law passed to protect pension rights. ERISA: sets minimum standards for pension plans, guaranteeing that pension rights cannot be unfairly denied to o... (more...)
A federal law passed to protect pension rights. ERISA: sets minimum standards for pension plans, guaranteeing that pension rights cannot be unfairly denied to or taken from a worker provides some protection for workers in the event certain types of pension plans cannot pay the benefits to which workers are entitled, and requires that employers provide full and clear information about employees' pension rights, including the way pension benefits accumulate, how the company invests pension funds, and when and how pension benefits can be collected.

DEED OF TRUST

See trust deed.

INVESTOR

A person who makes investments. An investor may act either for herself or on behalf of others. A stock broker or mutual fund manager, for instance, makes invest... (more...)
A person who makes investments. An investor may act either for herself or on behalf of others. A stock broker or mutual fund manager, for instance, makes investments for others who have entrusted her with their money.

PROBATE COURT

A specialized court or division of a state trial court that considers only cases concerning the distribution of deceased persons' estate. Called 'surrogate cour... (more...)
A specialized court or division of a state trial court that considers only cases concerning the distribution of deceased persons' estate. Called 'surrogate court' in New York and several other states, this court normally examines the authenticity of a will -- or if a person dies intestate, figures out who receives her property under state law. It then oversees a procedure to pay the deceased person's debts and to distribute her assets to the proper inheritors. See probate.

EXEMPTION TRUST

A bypass trust funded with an amount no larger than the personal federal estate tax exemption in the year of death. If the trust grantor leaves property worth m... (more...)
A bypass trust funded with an amount no larger than the personal federal estate tax exemption in the year of death. If the trust grantor leaves property worth more than that amount, it usually goes to the surviving spouse. The trust property passes free from estate tax because of the personal exemption, and the rest is shielded from tax under the surviving spouse's marital deduction.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

In re Estate of Tyner

Lacey Westbrook appeals from an adverse summary judgment rendered in the declaratory judgment action she initiated to have JW Tyner's will construed. Westbrook contends the trial court erroneously determined that she is not a beneficiary under the will, set the wrong postjudgment ...

In re Estate of Rhea

In October 2005, Charlotte and Trenton notified Charles of their intent to remove Wanda's personal property from the marital home. Charles labeled some of the possessions in the home to mark his own separate property, then left the house from November 11 through November 14. ...

In re Estate of Gaines

In eight issues, appellants argue (1) the trial court improperly disqualified Davis from serving as the independent executor because no motion to disqualify or opposition was filed, (2) the trial court erred in requiring Davis to turn over funds, (3) the trial court erred in denying ...