Franklin Estate Lawyer, Tennessee


Phyllis Marlene Boshears Lawyer

Phyllis Marlene Boshears

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Bankruptcy, Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Estate

P. Marlene Boshears is an attorney with Boshears Law. Marlene graduated from Nashville School of Law and practices primarily in Family, Juvenile, and... (more)

RANDALL K. WINTON Lawyer

RANDALL K. WINTON

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Business Organization, Bankruptcy & Debt, Tax, Estate

Randall Winton of Winton Law provides legal services throughout Nashville, Davidson County, Williamson County and Middle Tennessee for a variety of cl... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-730-5851

Samuel Calvin Blink Lawyer

Samuel Calvin Blink

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Construction, Real Estate, Business

Sam Blink is the managing member of Blink Law, LLC. His practice largely consists of corporate transactions, mergers and acquisitions, corporate struc... (more)

William H. Stover Lawyer

William H. Stover

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Lawsuit & Dispute
Civil Litigation, Criminal Defense, Family Law

William Stover is an experienced Tennessee attorney who provides premier legal services to clients seeking help in the areas of personal injury, crimi... (more)

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CONTACT

615-613-0541

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Mark Hartzog

Family Law, Wills & Probate, Estate Planning, Real Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           

F. Shayne Brasfield

Corporate, Criminal, Estate Planning, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

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Leigh Ann Roberts

Construction, Wills & Probate, Family Law, Civil Rights
Status:  In Good Standing           

William J. Shreffler

Business Organization, Construction, Employment, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           

Jennifer Lynne Sheppard

Wills, Wills & Probate, Family Law, Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           

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James A. Flexer

Social Security -- Disability, Family Law, Wills & Probate, Workers' Compensation
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Lawyer.com can help you easily and quickly find Franklin Estate Lawyers and Franklin Estate Law Firms. Refine your search by specific Estate practice areas such as Estate Planning, Trusts, Wills & Probate and Power of Attorney matters.

LEGAL TERMS

UNIFORM TRANSFER-ON-DEATH SECURITY ACT

A statute that allows people to name a beneficiary to inherit stocks or bonds without probate. The owner of the securities can register them with a broker using... (more...)
A statute that allows people to name a beneficiary to inherit stocks or bonds without probate. The owner of the securities can register them with a broker using a simple form that names a person to receive the property after the owner's death. Every state but Texas has adopted the statute.

DISTRIBUTEE

(1) Anyone who receives something. Usually, the term refers to someone who inherits a deceased person's property. If the deceased person dies without a will (ca... (more...)
(1) Anyone who receives something. Usually, the term refers to someone who inherits a deceased person's property. If the deceased person dies without a will (called intestate), state law determines what each distributee will receive. Also called a beneficiary.

INTESTATE SUCCESSION

The method by which property is distributed when a person dies without a valid will. Each state's law provides that the property be distributed to the closest s... (more...)
The method by which property is distributed when a person dies without a valid will. Each state's law provides that the property be distributed to the closest surviving relatives. In most states, the surviving spouse, children, parents, siblings, nieces and nephews, and next of kin inherit, in that order.

GRANTOR RETAINED INCOME TRUST

Irrevocable trusts designed to save on estate tax. There are several kinds; with all of them, you keep income from trust property, or use of that property, for ... (more...)
Irrevocable trusts designed to save on estate tax. There are several kinds; with all of them, you keep income from trust property, or use of that property, for a period of years. When the trust ends, the property goes to the final beneficiaries you've named. These trusts are for people who have enough wealth to feel comfortable giving away a substantial hunk of property. They come in three flavors: Grantor-Retained Annuity Trusts (GRATs), Grantor-Retained Unitrusts (GRUTs) and Grantor-Retained Income Trusts (GRITs).

DEATH TAXES

Taxes levied at death, based on the value of property left behind. Federal death taxes are called estate taxes. Some states levy inheritance taxes on people who... (more...)
Taxes levied at death, based on the value of property left behind. Federal death taxes are called estate taxes. Some states levy inheritance taxes on people who inherit property.

RESIDUARY BENEFICIARY

A person who receives any property by a will or trust that is not specifically left to another designated beneficiary. For example, if Antonio makes a will leav... (more...)
A person who receives any property by a will or trust that is not specifically left to another designated beneficiary. For example, if Antonio makes a will leaving his home to Edwina and the remainder of his property to Elmo, then Elmo is the residuary beneficiary.

ADEMPTION

The failure of a bequest of property in a will. The gift fails (is 'adeemed') because the person who made the will no longer owns the property when he or she di... (more...)
The failure of a bequest of property in a will. The gift fails (is 'adeemed') because the person who made the will no longer owns the property when he or she dies. Often this happens because the property has been sold, destroyed or given away to someone other than the beneficiary named in the will. A bequest may also be adeemed when the will maker, while still living, gives the property to the intended beneficiary (called 'ademption by satisfaction'). When a bequest is adeemed, the beneficiary named in the will is out of luck; he or she doesn't get cash or a different item of property to replace the one that was described in the will. For example, Mark writes in his will, 'I leave to Rob the family vehicle,' but then trades in his car in for a jet ski. When Mark dies, Rob will receive nothing. Frustrated beneficiaries may challenge an ademption in court, especially if the property was not clearly identified in the first place.

DISINHERIT

To deliberately prevent someone from inheriting something. This is usually done by a provision in a will stating that someone who would ordinarily inherit prope... (more...)
To deliberately prevent someone from inheriting something. This is usually done by a provision in a will stating that someone who would ordinarily inherit property -- a close family member, for example -- should not receive it. In most states, you cannot completely disinherit your spouse; a surviving spouse has the right to claim a portion (usually one-third to one-half) of the deceased spouse's estate. With a few exceptions, however, you can expressly disinherit children.

CERTIFIED COPY

A copy of a document issued by a court or government agency guaranteed to be a true and exact copy of the original. Many agencies and institutions require certi... (more...)
A copy of a document issued by a court or government agency guaranteed to be a true and exact copy of the original. Many agencies and institutions require certified copies of legal documents before permitting certain transactions. For example, a certified copy of a death certificate is required before a bank will release the funds in a deceased person's payable-on-death account to the person who has inherited them.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

In re Estate of Tanner

The decedent, Martha M. Tanner, died intestate while a resident of a nursing facility. Nineteen months later, the Bureau of TennCare filed a complaint in the Davidson County Chancery Court seeking the appointment of an administrator of her estate. The case was transferred to the ...

In re Estate of Davis

In this interlocutory appeal, the administrator of the estate of the decedent argues that a petition for probate, filed more than two years after the probate of an earlier will, is time-barred by Tennessee Code Annotated section 32-4-108, and, therefore, the trial court erroneously denied his ...

Estate of French v. Stratford House

The administratrix of the estate of the deceased brought this wrongful death suit against the defendant nursing home and its controlling entities, alleging damages as the result of ordinary negligence, negligence per se, and violations of the Tennessee Adult Protection Act. The ...