Gilliam RICO Act Lawyer, Missouri


Andrew Dean Popplewell Lawyer

Andrew Dean Popplewell

VERIFIED
Criminal, Traffic, Personal Injury

Andrew Popplewell focuses his practice on DWI defense, general criminal defense, alcohol and drug offenses and traffic violations. Andrew grew up and ... (more)

Thad R. Mulholland Lawyer

Thad R. Mulholland

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Workers' Compensation, Criminal

Thad Mulholland is an auto injury and auto and motorcycle accident lawyer at Eng and Woods in Columbia, MO. He is also a workers’ compensation lawye... (more)

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CONTACT

573-874-4190

Kevin Patrick O'Brien Lawyer

Kevin Patrick O'Brien

VERIFIED
Criminal, DUI-DWI, Felony, Traffic

Kevin O'Brien graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration from the University of Missouri in 1992. He received his JD degre... (more)

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CONTACT

800-724-2891

Michael R. Baker

Alcoholic Beverages, Alimony & Spousal Support, Apparel, Criminal, Medical Malpractice
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Stan Clay

Criminal, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Jenny R. Young

Family Law, Criminal, Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Karen Bourgeois

Adoption, Corporate, Child Support, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Jeffrey O. Parshall

Dispute Resolution, Arbitration, Criminal, Bad Faith Insurance, Slip & Fall Accident
Status:  In Good Standing           

W. Hamp Ford

Dispute Resolution, Animal Bite, Apparel, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Emily W. Little

Criminal, Civil Rights, Defamation & Slander, Dental Malpractice
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

CONVICTION

A finding by a judge or jury that the defendant is guilty of a crime.

NOLO CONTENDERE

A plea entered by the defendant in response to being charged with a crime. If a defendant pleads nolo contendere, she neither admits nor denies that she committ... (more...)
A plea entered by the defendant in response to being charged with a crime. If a defendant pleads nolo contendere, she neither admits nor denies that she committed the crime, but agrees to a punishment (usually a fine or jail time) as if guilty. Usually, this type of plea is entered because it can't be used as an admission of guilt if a civil case is held after the criminal trial.

EAVESDROPPING

Listening to conversations or observing conduct which is meant to be private, typically by using devices that amplify sound or light, such as stethoscopes or bi... (more...)
Listening to conversations or observing conduct which is meant to be private, typically by using devices that amplify sound or light, such as stethoscopes or binoculars. The term comes from the common law offense of listening to private conversations by crouching under the windows or eaves of a house. Nowadays, eavesdropping includes using electronic equipment to intercept telephone or other wire communications, or radio equipment to intercept broadcast communications. Generally, the term 'eavesdropping' is used when the activity is not legally authorized by a search warrant or court order; and the term 'surveillance' is used when the activity is permitted by law. Compare electronic surveillance.

ARREST

A situation in which the police detain a person in a manner that, to any reasonable person, makes it clear she is not free to leave. A person can be 'under arre... (more...)
A situation in which the police detain a person in a manner that, to any reasonable person, makes it clear she is not free to leave. A person can be 'under arrest' even though the police have not announced it; nor are handcuffs or physical restraint necessary. Questioning an arrested person about her involvement in or knowledge of a crime must be preceded by the Miranda warnings if the police intend to use the answers against the person in a criminal case. If the arrested person chooses to remain silent, the questioning must stop.

CHARGE

A formal accusation of criminal activity. The prosecuting attorney decides on the charges, after reviewing police reports, witness statements and any other evid... (more...)
A formal accusation of criminal activity. The prosecuting attorney decides on the charges, after reviewing police reports, witness statements and any other evidence of wrongdoing. Formal charges are announced at an arrested person's arraignment.

GRAND JURY

In criminal cases, a group that decides whether there is enough evidence to justify an indictment (formal charges) and a trial. A grand jury indictment is the f... (more...)
In criminal cases, a group that decides whether there is enough evidence to justify an indictment (formal charges) and a trial. A grand jury indictment is the first step, after arrest, in any formal prosecution of a felony.

JURY

Criminal Law Traffic TicketshomeGLOSSARY jury A group of people selected to apply the law, as stated by the judge, to the facts of a case and render a decision,... (more...)
Criminal Law Traffic TicketshomeGLOSSARY jury A group of people selected to apply the law, as stated by the judge, to the facts of a case and render a decision, called the verdict. Traditionally, an American jury was made up of 12 people who had to arrive at a unanimous decision. But today, in many states, juries in civil cases may be composed of as few as six members and non-unanimous verdicts may be permitted. (Most states still require 12-person, unanimous verdicts for criminal trials.) Tracing its history back over 1,000 years, the jury system was brought to England by William the Conqueror in 1066. The philosophy behind the jury system is that--especially in a criminal case--an accused's guilt or innocence should be judged by a group of people from her community ('a jury of her peers'). Recently, some courts have been experimenting with increasing the traditionally rather passive role of the jury by encouraging jurors to take notes and ask questions.

INDECENT EXPOSURE

Revealing one's genitals under circumstances likely to offend others. Exposure is indecent under the law whenever a reasonable person would or should know that ... (more...)
Revealing one's genitals under circumstances likely to offend others. Exposure is indecent under the law whenever a reasonable person would or should know that his act may be seen by others--for example, in a public place or through an open window--and that it is likely to cause affront or alarm. Indecent exposure is considered a misdemeanor in most states.

MISDEMEANOR

A crime, less serious than a felony, punishable by no more than one year in jail. Petty theft (of articles worth less than a certain amount), first-time drunk d... (more...)
A crime, less serious than a felony, punishable by no more than one year in jail. Petty theft (of articles worth less than a certain amount), first-time drunk driving and leaving the scene of an accident are all common misdemeanors.