Saint Louis RICO Act Lawyer, Missouri


Greg S. Kessler Lawyer

Greg S. Kessler

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Real Estate, Traffic

Greg Kessler is a practicing lawyer in the state of Missouri. He graduated from Washington University with his J.D. in 1973.

Rebecca J. Grosser Lawyer

Rebecca J. Grosser

VERIFIED
Criminal, Juvenile Law, Employment Discrimination, DUI-DWI, Civil Rights

Since 1997, Rebecca has worked hard to represent thousands of individuals in St. Louis – each with a different background and unique legal situation... (more)

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CONTACT

800-976-4501

Mark R Bates Lawyer

Mark R Bates

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Workers' Compensation, Employment, Insurance
Relationships That Drive Results

Mark Bates has practiced law for over 30 years, primarily in Missouri and Illinois. He specializes in employment law and workers' compensation. Over... (more)

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CONTACT

800-908-7871

Eric  Boehmer Lawyer

Eric Boehmer

VERIFIED
Criminal, Accident & Injury, Juvenile Law, Divorce & Family Law
Award Winning and Experienced Attorney

Eric Boehmer is an award winning attorney with the experience, confidence and knowledge to deal with the authorities when it comes to defending indivi... (more)

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CONTACT

800-717-6021

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Joel B. Eisenstein Lawyer

Joel B. Eisenstein

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Accident & Injury, Traffic, Real Estate
Practice limited primarily to St. Charles and surrounding Missouri counties.

The Eisenstein Law Firm has represented individuals in all areas of Family Law, Criminal Defense, Traffic-Related Matters, Personal Injury, Automobile... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

636-947-1000

Kevin  Roach Lawyer

Kevin Roach

Criminal, Personal Injury, Accident & Injury

Kevin Roach is a native St. Louisan and has been practicing law in Missouri and Illinois since 2001. After receiving his B.A. from Colorado State Univ... (more)

Richard A. Gartner Lawyer

Richard A. Gartner

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Criminal, Adoption

Richard Gartner has been actively practicing law for the last 38 years, garnering the highest honors alongside countless trials in and around St. Char... (more)

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CONTACT

800-711-9030

Travis W. T. Grafe Lawyer

Travis W. T. Grafe

VERIFIED
Criminal, Workers' Compensation, Motor Vehicle, Estate
We Help People Who Are Charged With Crimes

Travis W. T. Grafe was born and raised in Belleville, Illinois, where he graduated from Belleville Township High School West in 1995. Mr. Grafe attend... (more)

David Gutwein

Bankruptcy, Criminal, Traffic
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Richard H. Sindel

Litigation, White Collar Crime, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

CRIME

A type of behavior that is has been defined by the state, as deserving of punishment which usually includes imprisonment. Crimes and their punishments are defin... (more...)
A type of behavior that is has been defined by the state, as deserving of punishment which usually includes imprisonment. Crimes and their punishments are defined by Congress and state legislatures.

BAIL

The money paid to the court, usually at arraignment or shortly thereafter, to ensure that an arrested person who is released from jail will show up at all requi... (more...)
The money paid to the court, usually at arraignment or shortly thereafter, to ensure that an arrested person who is released from jail will show up at all required court appearances. The amount of bail is determined by the local bail schedule, which is based on the seriousness of the offense. The judge can increase the bail if the prosecutor convinces him that the defendant is likely to flee (for example, if he has failed to show up in court in the past), or he can decrease it if the defense attorney shows that the defendant is unlikely to run (for example, he has strong ties to the community by way of a steady job and a family).

JURY NULLIFICATION

A decision by the jury to acquit a defendant who has violated a law that the jury believes is unjust or wrong. Jury nullification has always been an option for ... (more...)
A decision by the jury to acquit a defendant who has violated a law that the jury believes is unjust or wrong. Jury nullification has always been an option for juries in England and the United States, although judges will prevent a defense lawyer from urging the jury to acquit on this basis. Nullification was evident during the Vietnam war (when selective service protesters were acquitted by juries opposed to the war) and currently appears in criminal cases when the jury disagrees with the punishment--for example, in 'three strikes' cases when the jury realizes that conviction of a relatively minor offense will result in lifetime imprisonment.

HUNG JURY

A jury unable to come to a final decision, resulting in a mistrial. Judges do their best to avoid hung juries, typically sending juries back into deliberations ... (more...)
A jury unable to come to a final decision, resulting in a mistrial. Judges do their best to avoid hung juries, typically sending juries back into deliberations with an assurance (sometimes known as a 'dynamite charge') that they will be able to reach a decision if they try harder. If a mistrial is declared, the case is tried again unless the parties settle the case (in a civil case) or the prosecution dismisses the charges or offers a plea bargain (in a criminal case).

ARREST

A situation in which the police detain a person in a manner that, to any reasonable person, makes it clear she is not free to leave. A person can be 'under arre... (more...)
A situation in which the police detain a person in a manner that, to any reasonable person, makes it clear she is not free to leave. A person can be 'under arrest' even though the police have not announced it; nor are handcuffs or physical restraint necessary. Questioning an arrested person about her involvement in or knowledge of a crime must be preceded by the Miranda warnings if the police intend to use the answers against the person in a criminal case. If the arrested person chooses to remain silent, the questioning must stop.

INFRACTION

A minor violation of the law that is punishable only by a fine--for example, a traffic or parking ticket. Not all vehicle-related violations are infractions, ho... (more...)
A minor violation of the law that is punishable only by a fine--for example, a traffic or parking ticket. Not all vehicle-related violations are infractions, however--refusing to identify oneself when involved in an accident is a misdemeanor in some states.

EAVESDROPPING

Listening to conversations or observing conduct which is meant to be private, typically by using devices that amplify sound or light, such as stethoscopes or bi... (more...)
Listening to conversations or observing conduct which is meant to be private, typically by using devices that amplify sound or light, such as stethoscopes or binoculars. The term comes from the common law offense of listening to private conversations by crouching under the windows or eaves of a house. Nowadays, eavesdropping includes using electronic equipment to intercept telephone or other wire communications, or radio equipment to intercept broadcast communications. Generally, the term 'eavesdropping' is used when the activity is not legally authorized by a search warrant or court order; and the term 'surveillance' is used when the activity is permitted by law. Compare electronic surveillance.

CHARGE

A formal accusation of criminal activity. The prosecuting attorney decides on the charges, after reviewing police reports, witness statements and any other evid... (more...)
A formal accusation of criminal activity. The prosecuting attorney decides on the charges, after reviewing police reports, witness statements and any other evidence of wrongdoing. Formal charges are announced at an arrested person's arraignment.

HABEAS CORPUS

Latin for 'You have the body.' A prisoner files a petition for writ of habeas corpus in order to challenge the authority of the prison or jail warden to continu... (more...)
Latin for 'You have the body.' A prisoner files a petition for writ of habeas corpus in order to challenge the authority of the prison or jail warden to continue to hold him. If the judge orders a hearing after reading the writ, the prisoner gets to argue that his confinement is illegal. These writs are frequently filed by convicted prisoners who challenge their conviction on the grounds that the trial attorney failed to prepare the defense and was incompetent. Prisoners sentenced to death also file habeas petitions challenging the constitutionality of the state death penalty law. Habeas writs are different from and do not replace appeals, which are arguments for reversal of a conviction based on claims that the judge conducted the trial improperly. Often, convicted prisoners file both.