Gresham Divorce Lawyer, Oregon

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Includes: Alimony & Spousal Support

Erin A O'Riley Lawyer

Erin A O'Riley

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Child Custody, Divorce

Erin O’Riley already had built substantial family law experience before graduating from law school. While attending Willamette University College of... (more)

Chamber  Dorheim Lawyer

Chamber Dorheim

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Child Custody, Family Law, Divorce

Chamber Dorheim believes that, after a relationship ends, people are still family—just in a different form. She approaches her cases in a way that p... (more)

Leslie G. MacDonald

Adoption, Child Support, Divorce, Elder Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Matthew C. McKean

Divorce & Family Law, Adoption, Divorce, Elder Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

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Ingrid E. Slezak

Farms, Divorce, Child Support, Adoption
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

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M. Scott Leibenguth

Farms, Divorce, Estate Planning, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Suzanne J. Noland

Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support, Adoption, Business Organization
Status:  In Good Standing           

Nick A. Drakulich

Child Support, Construction, Farms, Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           

Thomas M. Brasier

Adoption, Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support, Farms
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  9 Years

Sandra Kuenzi

Divorce, Estate Planning, Family Law, Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

ARREARAGES

Overdue alimony or child support payments. In recent years, state laws have made it difficult to impossible to get rid of arrearages; they can't be discharged i... (more...)
Overdue alimony or child support payments. In recent years, state laws have made it difficult to impossible to get rid of arrearages; they can't be discharged in bankruptcy, and courts usually will not retroactively cancel them. A spouse or parent who falls on tough times and is unable to make payments should request a temporary modification of the payments before the arrearages build up.

ALIMONY

The money paid by one ex-spouse to the other for support under the terms of a court order or settlement agreement following a divorce. Except in marriages of lo... (more...)
The money paid by one ex-spouse to the other for support under the terms of a court order or settlement agreement following a divorce. Except in marriages of long duration (ten years or more) or in the case of an ailing spouse, alimony usually lasts for a set period, with the expectation that the recipient spouse will become self-supporting. Alimony is also called 'spousal support' or 'maintenance.'

COMPLAINT

Papers filed with a court clerk by the plaintiff to initiate a lawsuit by setting out facts and legal claims (usually called causes of action). In some states a... (more...)
Papers filed with a court clerk by the plaintiff to initiate a lawsuit by setting out facts and legal claims (usually called causes of action). In some states and in some types of legal actions, such as divorce, complaints are called petitions and the person filing is called the petitioner. To complete the initial stage of a lawsuit, the plaintiff's complaint must be served on the defendant, who then has the opportunity to respond by filing an answer. In practice, few lawyers prepare complaints from scratch. Instead they use -- and sometimes modify -- pre-drafted complaints widely available in form books.

ACKNOWLEDGED FATHER

The biological father of a child born to an unmarried couple who has been established as the father either by his admission or by an agreement between him and t... (more...)
The biological father of a child born to an unmarried couple who has been established as the father either by his admission or by an agreement between him and the child's mother. An acknowledged father must pay child support.

HEARING

In the trial court context, a legal proceeding (other than a full-scale trial) held before a judge. During a hearing, evidence and arguments are presented in an... (more...)
In the trial court context, a legal proceeding (other than a full-scale trial) held before a judge. During a hearing, evidence and arguments are presented in an effort to resolve a disputed factual or legal issue. Hearings typically, but by no means always, occur prior to trial when a party asks the judge to decide a specific issue--often on an interim basis--such as whether a temporary restraining order or preliminary injunction should be issued, or temporary child custody or child support awarded. In the administrative or agency law context, a hearing is usually a proceeding before an administrative hearing officer or judge representing an agency that has the power to regulate a particular field or oversee a governmental benefit program. For example, the Federal Aviation Board (FAB) has the authority to hold hearings on airline safety, and a state Worker's Compensation Appeals Board has the power to rule on the appeals of people whose applications for benefits have been denied.

FOSTER CARE

Court-ordered care provided to children who are unable to live in their own homes, usually because their parents have abused or neglected them. Foster parents h... (more...)
Court-ordered care provided to children who are unable to live in their own homes, usually because their parents have abused or neglected them. Foster parents have a legal responsibility to care for their foster children, but do not have all the rights of a biological parent--for example, they may have limited rights to discipline the children, to raise them according to a certain religion or to authorize non-emergency medical procedures for them. The foster parents do not become the child's legal parents unless the biological parents' rights are terminated by a court and the foster parents adopt the child. This is not typically encouraged, as the goal of foster care is to provide temporary support for the children until they can be returned to their parents. See also foster child.

MARITAL PROPERTY

Most of the property accumulated by spouses during a marriage, called community property in some states. States differ as to exactly what is included in marital... (more...)
Most of the property accumulated by spouses during a marriage, called community property in some states. States differ as to exactly what is included in marital property; some states include all property and earnings dring the marriage, while others exclude gifts and inheritances.

TENANCY BY THE ENTIRETY

A special kind of property ownership that's only for married couples. Both spouses have the right to enjoy the entire property, and when one spouse dies, the su... (more...)
A special kind of property ownership that's only for married couples. Both spouses have the right to enjoy the entire property, and when one spouse dies, the surviving spouse gets title to the property (called a right of survivorship). It is similar to joint tenancy, but it is available in only about half the states.

RESTRAINING ORDER

An order from a court directing one person not to do something, such as make contact with another person, enter the family home or remove a child from the state... (more...)
An order from a court directing one person not to do something, such as make contact with another person, enter the family home or remove a child from the state. Restraining orders are typically issued in cases in which spousal abuse or stalking is feared -- or has occurred -- in an attempt to ensure the victim's safety. Restraining orders are also commonly issued to cool down ugly disputes between neighbors.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

In re Marriage of Dahl and Angle

... The agreement with the IVF facility provided, among other things, that (1) the frozen embryos would not be released from storage without the parties' mutual written consent; (2) in the event of divorce, legal ownership of the stored embryos was to be determined in a property 840 ...

Saldivar v. Roberts

... and professionally. In March, 2008, my wife filed divorce proceedings. I did ... There were numerous letters sent to me in my divorce case that I have been asked to sign for to prove receipt around the time I was served. I have just recently ...

VOTAW v. Department of Revenue

... IRC section 215 [3] permits a taxpayer to deduct payments paid during a tax year for alimony as defined in IRC section 71. Alimony is defined as "any payment in cash if—. "(A) such payment is received by (or on behalf of) a spouse under a divorce or separation instrument,. ...