Indianapolis Criminal Lawyer, Indiana


Christopher M. Eskew Lawyer

Christopher M. Eskew

VERIFIED
Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Felony, Bankruptcy & Debt, Divorce
Criminal Defense Attorney with Eskew Law LLC

Chris Eskew is a litigator and trial attorney with years of experience counseling clients in a wide spectrum of legal practice areas. The legal profe... (more)

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CONTACT

800-950-8280

Matthew Culp Maples Lawyer

Matthew Culp Maples

VERIFIED
Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Accident & Injury

Matthew Maples is a criminal defense lawyer proudly serving Indianapolis, IN and the neighboring communities.

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-940-1981

Ian William Thompson Lawyer

Ian William Thompson

VERIFIED
Criminal, Personal Injury, Divorce & Family Law, DUI-DWI, Traffic

A sole practitioner, Ian W. Thompson handles a variety of legal matters through his Indianapolis law office. He is known throughout the state of India... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-749-0520

Joshua  Levin Lawyer

Joshua Levin

VERIFIED
Criminal, DUI-DWI, Misdemeanor, Felony, Traffic

Joshua Levin is a practicing lawyer in the state of Indiana.

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-445-9011

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Steven M. Crell Lawyer

Steven M. Crell

VERIFIED
Criminal, Real Estate, Employment, Litigation, Business

Named an Indiana SuperLawyer in personal injury in 2016 and 2017, Steve Crell has for the last 28 years aggressively represented clients in all areas ... (more)

David  Henn Lawyer

David Henn

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Employment, Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Estate
Knowledge. Experience. Integrity.

David M. Henn was born in Indianapolis, Indiana. Mr. Henn was admitted to the bar in 1994 in Indiana , and also is admitted to practice before the Uni... (more)

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CONTACT

800-592-0120

Steven Smith Davis Lawyer

Steven Smith Davis

VERIFIED
Criminal, Accident & Injury, Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Real Estate

In 2009, he graduated from Indiana University Law School-Indianapolis. That same year, he was admitted to the Indiana State Bar and the Southern D... (more)

Charles C. Engel Lawyer

Charles C. Engel

VERIFIED
General Practice

Whether you need assistance with family law services or a real estate transaction or you've been charged with a crime, you need a lawyer you can trust... (more)

Roscoe  Stovall Lawyer

Roscoe Stovall

VERIFIED
Criminal, Accident & Injury

Roscoe Stovall is a practicing lawyer in the state of Indiana.

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LEGAL TERMS

ACCESSORY

Someone who intentionally helps another person commit a felony by giving advice before the crime or helping to conceal the evidence or the perpetrator. An acces... (more...)
Someone who intentionally helps another person commit a felony by giving advice before the crime or helping to conceal the evidence or the perpetrator. An accessory is usually not physically present during the crime. For example, hiding a robber who is being sought by the police might make you an 'accessory after the fact' to a robbery. Compare accomplice.

ARREST WARRANT

A document issued by a judge or magistrate that authorizes the police to arrest someone. Warrants are issued when law enforcement personnel present evidence to ... (more...)
A document issued by a judge or magistrate that authorizes the police to arrest someone. Warrants are issued when law enforcement personnel present evidence to the judge or magistrate that convinces her that it is reasonably likely that a crime has taken place and that the person to be named in the warrant is criminally responsible for that crime.

PLEA BARGAIN

A negotiation between the defense and prosecution (and sometimes the judge) that settles a criminal case. The defendant typically pleads guilty to a lesser crim... (more...)
A negotiation between the defense and prosecution (and sometimes the judge) that settles a criminal case. The defendant typically pleads guilty to a lesser crime (or fewer charges) than originally charged, in exchange for a guaranteed sentence that is shorter than what the defendant could face if convicted at trial. The prosecution gets the certainty of a conviction and a known sentence; the defendant avoids the risk of a higher sentence; and the judge gets to move on to other cases.

DISCOVERY

A formal investigation -- governed by court rules -- that is conducted before trial. Discovery allows one party to question other parties, and sometimes witness... (more...)
A formal investigation -- governed by court rules -- that is conducted before trial. Discovery allows one party to question other parties, and sometimes witnesses. It also allows one party to force the others to produce requested documents or other physical evidence. The most common types of discovery are interrogatories, consisting of written questions the other party must answer under penalty of perjury, and depositions, which involve an in-person session at which one party to a lawsuit has the opportunity to ask oral questions of the other party or her witnesses under oath while a written transcript is made by a court reporter. Other types of pretrial discovery consist of written requests to produce documents and requests for admissions, by which one party asks the other to admit or deny key facts in the case. One major purpose of discovery is to assess the strength or weakness of an opponent's case, with the idea of opening settlement talks. Another is to gather information to use at trial. Discovery is also present in criminal cases, in which by law the prosecutor must turn over to the defense any witness statements and any evidence that might tend to exonerate the defendant. Depending on the rules of the court, the defendant may also be obliged to share evidence with the prosecutor.

SENTENCE

Punishment in a criminal case. A sentence can range from a fine and community service to life imprisonment or death. For most crimes, the sentence is chosen by ... (more...)
Punishment in a criminal case. A sentence can range from a fine and community service to life imprisonment or death. For most crimes, the sentence is chosen by the trial judge; the jury chooses the sentence only in a capital case, when it must choose between life in prison without parole and death.

HABEAS CORPUS

Latin for 'You have the body.' A prisoner files a petition for writ of habeas corpus in order to challenge the authority of the prison or jail warden to continu... (more...)
Latin for 'You have the body.' A prisoner files a petition for writ of habeas corpus in order to challenge the authority of the prison or jail warden to continue to hold him. If the judge orders a hearing after reading the writ, the prisoner gets to argue that his confinement is illegal. These writs are frequently filed by convicted prisoners who challenge their conviction on the grounds that the trial attorney failed to prepare the defense and was incompetent. Prisoners sentenced to death also file habeas petitions challenging the constitutionality of the state death penalty law. Habeas writs are different from and do not replace appeals, which are arguments for reversal of a conviction based on claims that the judge conducted the trial improperly. Often, convicted prisoners file both.

MISDEMEANOR

A crime, less serious than a felony, punishable by no more than one year in jail. Petty theft (of articles worth less than a certain amount), first-time drunk d... (more...)
A crime, less serious than a felony, punishable by no more than one year in jail. Petty theft (of articles worth less than a certain amount), first-time drunk driving and leaving the scene of an accident are all common misdemeanors.

MENS REA

The mental component of criminal liability. To be guilty of most crimes, a defendant must have committed the criminal act (the actus reus) in a certain mental s... (more...)
The mental component of criminal liability. To be guilty of most crimes, a defendant must have committed the criminal act (the actus reus) in a certain mental state (the mens rea). The mens rea of robbery, for example, is the intent to permanently deprive the owner of his property.

INSANITY

See criminal insanity.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Henley v. State

... In August 1998 Antwain Henley was charged with attempted murder, a Class A felony, two counts of kidnapping as Class A felonies, two counts of robbery as Class B felonies, carjacking as a Class B felony, and criminal mischief as a Class D felony. ...

State v. Davis

... 49A02-0706-CR-545. RUCKER, Justice. Today we examine the question of whether it is a violation of fundamental fairness to hold criminal charges over the head of an incompetent defendant who will never be able to stand trial. The answer in this case is yes. ...

Wallace v. State

... See Dru Sjodin National Sex Offender Public Website, http://www.nsopr.gov (last visited April 23, 2009). Criminal penalties associated with the duty to register have increased as well. ... 5. Application Only to Criminal Behavior. ...