Indianapolis Real Estate Lawyer, Indiana


Andrew J. Thompson Lawyer

Andrew J. Thompson

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Wills & Probate, Criminal, Real Estate, Business
Over 27 Years of Legal Experience.

Andrew J Thompson was admitted to practice law in Indiana in 1990. Mr. Thompson has experience in business law, estate planning, creditor and debtor l... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-914-5681

Donald Wayne Mcinnes Lawyer

Donald Wayne Mcinnes

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Collection, Estate, Real Estate, Personal Injury

Don has been exclusively practicing community association law across Indiana for almost a decade. He is a member of Community Associations Institute ... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-903-8920

Steven M. Crell Lawyer

Steven M. Crell

VERIFIED
Real Estate, Employment, Litigation, Business

Named an Indiana SuperLawyer in personal injury in 2016 and 2017, Steve Crell has for the last 28 years aggressively represented clients in all areas ... (more)

Jeffrey Owen Meunier Lawyer

Jeffrey Owen Meunier

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Employment, Lawsuit & Dispute, Real Estate

Service is top priority at my law firm. At Jeffrey O. Meunier, Attorney at Law, I work each day to ensure that my clients receive the personal attenti... (more)

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CONTACT

800-647-3270

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C. Duane O'Neal

Arbitration, Business Organization, Construction, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Andi M. Metzel

Administrative Law, Employment, Land Use & Zoning, Litigation
Status:  In Good Standing           

Paul F. Lindemann

Corporate, Business Organization, Business Successions, Commercial Real Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Paul J. Dunne

Credit & Debt, Foreclosure, Intellectual Property, Lending
Status:  In Good Standing           

Richard Dick

Corporate, Business Organization, Construction, Contract
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

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Marvin H Mitchell

Real Estate, Litigation, Corporate, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

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LEGAL TERMS

EVIDENCE

The many types of information presented to a judge or jury designed to convince them of the truth or falsity of key facts. Evidence typically includes testimony... (more...)
The many types of information presented to a judge or jury designed to convince them of the truth or falsity of key facts. Evidence typically includes testimony of witnesses, documents, photographs, items of damaged property, government records, videos and laboratory reports. Rules that are as strict as they are quirky and technical govern what types of evidence can be properly admitted as part of a trial. For example, the hearsay rule purports to prevent secondhand testimony of the 'he said, she said' variety, but the existence of dozens of exceptions often means that hairsplitting lawyers can find a way to introduce such testimony into evidence. See also admissible evidence, inadmissible evidence.

COVENANTS, CONDITIONS & RESTRICTIONS (CC&RS)

The restrictions governing the use of real estate, usually enforced by a homeowners' association and passed on to the new owners of property. For example, CC&Rs... (more...)
The restrictions governing the use of real estate, usually enforced by a homeowners' association and passed on to the new owners of property. For example, CC&Rs may tell you how big your house can be, how you must landscape your yard or whether you can have pets. If property is subject to CC&Rs, buyers must be notified before the sale takes place.

OFFENSIVE COLLATERAL ESTOPPEL

A doctrine that prevents a defendant from re-litigating an issue after it has been lost. For example, if your neighbor sues you for putting up a fence on his la... (more...)
A doctrine that prevents a defendant from re-litigating an issue after it has been lost. For example, if your neighbor sues you for putting up a fence on his land and the court rules that your fence extends beyond your property line, you can't later file your own lawsuit seeking a declaration that the property line is incorrectly drawn.

INURE

To take effect, or to benefit someone. In property law, the term means 'to vest.' For example, Jim buys a beach house that includes the right to travel across t... (more...)
To take effect, or to benefit someone. In property law, the term means 'to vest.' For example, Jim buys a beach house that includes the right to travel across the neighbor's property to get to the water. That right of way is said, cryptically, 'to inure to the benefit of Jim.'

COMMERCIAL FRUSTRATION

An unforeseen and uncontrollable event that excuses a party to a contract from performing his or her duties under that contract. For example, a landlord can bre... (more...)
An unforeseen and uncontrollable event that excuses a party to a contract from performing his or her duties under that contract. For example, a landlord can break a lease if the property she agreed to rent accidentally burns down before the tenants move in.

DEEP LINK

A link from one website to another that bypasses the second website's home page and takes the user directly to an internal page on the site. For example, a deep... (more...)
A link from one website to another that bypasses the second website's home page and takes the user directly to an internal page on the site. For example, a deep link from Yahoo might take the user directly to a news article on a news site instead of linking to the home page of the site.

ARBITRATION

A non-court procedure for resolving disputes using one or more neutral third parties -- called the arbitrator or arbitration panel. Arbitration uses rules of ev... (more...)
A non-court procedure for resolving disputes using one or more neutral third parties -- called the arbitrator or arbitration panel. Arbitration uses rules of evidence and procedure that are less formal than those followed in trial courts, which usually leads to a faster, less-expensive resolution. There are many types of arbitration in common use: Binding arbitration is similar to a court proceeding in that the arbitrator has the power to impose a decision, although this is sometimes limited by agreement -- for example, in 'hi-lo arbitration' the parties may agree in advance to a maximum and minimum award. In non-binding arbitration, the arbitrator can recommend but not impose a decision. Many contracts -- including those imposed on customers by many financial and healthcare organizations -- require mandatory arbitration in the event of a dispute. This may be reasonable when the arbitrator really is neutral, but is justifiably criticized when the large company that writes the contract is able to influence the choice of the arbitrator.

APPRECIATION

An increase in value. Appreciated property is property that has gone up in value since it was acquired.

ASSIGNEE

A person to whom a property right is transferred. For example, an assignee may take over a lease from a tenant who wants to permanently move out before the leas... (more...)
A person to whom a property right is transferred. For example, an assignee may take over a lease from a tenant who wants to permanently move out before the lease expires. The assignee takes control of the property and assumes all the legal rights and responsibilities of the tenant, including payment of rent. However, the original tenant remains legally responsible if the assignee fails to pay the rent.