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Lexington Child Custody Lawyer, North Carolina


Includes: Guardianships & Conservatorships, Custody & Visitation

Richard T Dail

Personal Injury, Child Custody, Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Traffic
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Clint Dorman

Social Security -- Disability, Criminal, Traffic, Child Custody, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  13 Years

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Al Sergiacomi

Social Security, Estate Planning, Transactions, Guardianships & Conservatorships
Status:  In Good Standing           

C. R. Long

Mediation, Child Custody, Arbitration, Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

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LEGAL TERMS

ACKNOWLEDGED FATHER

The biological father of a child born to an unmarried couple who has been established as the father either by his admission or by an agreement between him and t... (more...)
The biological father of a child born to an unmarried couple who has been established as the father either by his admission or by an agreement between him and the child's mother. An acknowledged father must pay child support.

SHARED CUSTODY

See joint custody.

DEFAULT DIVORCE

See uncontested divorce.

STEPPARENT ADOPTION

The formal, legal adoption of a child by a stepparent who is living with a legal parent. Most states have special provisions making stepparent adoptions relativ... (more...)
The formal, legal adoption of a child by a stepparent who is living with a legal parent. Most states have special provisions making stepparent adoptions relatively easy if the child's noncustodial parent gives consent, is dead or missing, or has abandoned the child.

SEPARATION

A situation in which the partners in a married couple live apart. Spouses are said to be living apart if they no longer reside in the same dwelling, even though... (more...)
A situation in which the partners in a married couple live apart. Spouses are said to be living apart if they no longer reside in the same dwelling, even though they may continue their relationship. A legal separation results when the parties separate and a court rules on the division of property, such as alimony or child support -- but does not grant a divorce.

LEGAL RISK PLACEMENT

A type of adoption used by agencies to keep a child out of foster care during the adoption process. The child is placed with the adopting parents before the bir... (more...)
A type of adoption used by agencies to keep a child out of foster care during the adoption process. The child is placed with the adopting parents before the birthmother has legally given up her rights to raise the child. If she then decides not to relinquish her rights, the adopting parents must give the child back. This is a risk for the adopting parents, who may lose a child to whom they've become attached.

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE

An order from a judge that directs a party to come to court and convince the judge why she shouldn't grant an action proposed by the other side or by the judge ... (more...)
An order from a judge that directs a party to come to court and convince the judge why she shouldn't grant an action proposed by the other side or by the judge on her own (sua sponte). For example, in a divorce, at the request of one parent a judge might issue an order directing the other parent to appear in court on a particular date and time to show cause why the first parent should not be given sole physical custody of the children. Although it would seem that the person receiving an order to show cause is at a procedural disadvantage--she, after all, is the one who is told to come up with a convincing reason why the judge shouldn't order something--both sides normally have an equal chance to convince the judge to rule in their favor.

INCURABLE INSANITY

A legal reason for obtaining either a fault divorce or a no-fault divorce. It is rarely used, however, because of the difficulty of proving both the insanity of... (more...)
A legal reason for obtaining either a fault divorce or a no-fault divorce. It is rarely used, however, because of the difficulty of proving both the insanity of the spouse being divorced and that the insanity is incurable.

SPOUSAL SUPPORT

See alimony.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Mason v. Dwinnell

... 50-13.1 to seek custody of a child from a natural parent." Id. ... [4]. We believe these circumstances are analogous to those in Price, in which the plaintiff, a man who had previously lived with the child's mother, sought custody. ...

Heatzig v. MacLean

... 340, 342, 540 SE2d 804, 806 (2000) ("[T]he findings and conclusions of the trial court must comport with [the] case law regarding child custody matters."); see also Concerned Citizens v. Holden Beach Enterprises, 329 NC 37, 54-55, 404 SE2d 677, 688 (1991) ("When the order ...

In re THT

... In re Montgomery, 311 NC 101, 109, 316 SE2d 246, 251 (1984) (emphasizing that "[t]he fundamental principle underlying North Carolina's approach to controversies involving child neglect and custody [is] that the best interest of the child is the polar star"); see also NCGS § 7B ...