Marietta Divorce & Family Law Lawyer, Georgia

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Vic Brown Hill Lawyer

Vic Brown Hill

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Child Custody, Child Support, Divorce, Family Law
Aggressive Advocacy in Divorce and Family Law.

Mr. Hill is first and foremost a trial attorney that limits his practice to divorce and other domestic relations cases. Mr. Hill holds a peer review r... (more)

Justin James Wyatt Lawyer

Justin James Wyatt

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Personal Injury, Criminal, DUI-DWI, Real Estate
AGGRESSIVE, CREATIVE, EXPERIENCED

Justin J. Wyatt graduated from Mercer University Law School in 1993. While attending law school he clerked for the United States Attorney’s Office f... (more)

Debbie C. Pelerose Lawyer

Debbie C. Pelerose

VERIFIED
Family Law, Divorce, Child Support, Child Custody, Federal Trial Practice

A native Georgian, Debbie Crosby Pelerose was born in 1960 in Macon, Georgia. Debbie moved to the Atlanta area in 1966 and grew up in Smyrna, Georgia,... (more)

Carol S. Baskin Lawyer

Carol S. Baskin

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Bankruptcy, Estate, Juvenile Law, Misdemeanor

Carol Baskin started practicing family law because she wanted to protect the relationships of families in Georgia. Baskin & Baskin, LLC was founded in... (more)

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Karen Brown Williams Lawyer

Karen Brown Williams

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Employment, Family Law, Child Custody, Child Support

Our firm focuses on serving the individual in difficult cases involving families. Our small, relationship-based practice emphasizes personal attention... (more)

Charles Nicholas Wardlaw Lawyer

Charles Nicholas Wardlaw

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Mediation, Accident & Injury, Criminal, Traffic

Charles Wardlaw proudly serves Marietta, Georgia and the neighboring communities in the areas of divorce & family law, accident & injury, criminal, a... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-951-1571

Janice F. Alfred Lawyer

Janice F. Alfred

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Child Custody, Paternity, Domestic Violence & Neglect, DUI-DWI
The Right Attorney Makes a Difference! Find Out How We Can Fight For You!

Attorney Janice Alfred is the managing attorney at the Alfred Law Firm. She has been practicing law in the state of Georgia since 2004. Ms. Alfred c... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-875-7850

Robert S. Windholz Lawyer

Robert S. Windholz

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Criminal, Traffic, Divorce & Family Law, Lawsuit & Dispute

An AV® Peer Review RatedSM attorney by Martindale-Hubbell®, Bob earned his J.D. from Emory University Law School in 1973. Bob had considered a legal... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

678-990-1584

Homer Perry Jordan Lawyer

Homer Perry Jordan

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Accident & Injury, Criminal, Lawsuit & Dispute
Legal Solutions for a Brighter Tomorrow

Homer Jordan is a practicing attorney in the state of Georgia. He received his J.D. from John Marshall Law School in 2016.

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-590-3350

W. Henry Clerke IV Lawyer

W. Henry Clerke IV

VERIFIED
Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Accident & Injury, Civil & Human Rights, Juvenile Law

Since 1991, W. Henry Clerke IV has been successfully representing clients from the greater Atlanta area. His aggressive strategies and focus on protec... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-769-8430

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LEGAL TERMS

HEAD OF HOUSEHOLD

A person who supports and maintains, in one household, one or more people who are closely related to him by blood, marriage or adoption. Under federal income ta... (more...)
A person who supports and maintains, in one household, one or more people who are closely related to him by blood, marriage or adoption. Under federal income tax law, you are eligible for favorable tax treatment as the head of household only if you are unmarried and you manage a household which is the principal residence (for more than half of the year) of dependent children or other dependent relatives. Under bankruptcy homestead and exemption laws, the terms householder and 'head of household' mean the same thing. Examples include a single woman supporting her disabled sister and her own children or a bachelor supporting his parents. Many states consider a single person supporting only himself to be a head of household as well.

FAMILY COURT

A separate court, or more likely a separate division of the regular state trial court, that considers only cases involving divorce (dissolution of marriage), ch... (more...)
A separate court, or more likely a separate division of the regular state trial court, that considers only cases involving divorce (dissolution of marriage), child custody and support, guardianship, adoption, and other cases having to do with family-related issues, including the issuance of restraining orders in domestic violence cases.

BEST INTERESTS (OF THE CHILD)

The test that courts use when deciding who will take care of a child. For instance, an adoption is allowed only when a court declares it to be in the best inter... (more...)
The test that courts use when deciding who will take care of a child. For instance, an adoption is allowed only when a court declares it to be in the best interests of the child. Similarly, when asked to decide on custody issues in a divorce case, the judge will base his or her decision on the child's best interests. And the same test is used when judges decide whether a child should be removed from a parent's home because of neglect or abuse. Factors considered by the court in deciding the best interests of a child include: age and sex of the child mental and physical health of the child mental and physical health of the parents lifestyle and other social factors of the parents emotional ties between the parents and the child ability of the parents to provide the child with food, shelter, clothing and medical care established living pattern for the child concerning school, home, community and religious institution quality of schooling, and the child's preference.

SEPARATION

A situation in which the partners in a married couple live apart. Spouses are said to be living apart if they no longer reside in the same dwelling, even though... (more...)
A situation in which the partners in a married couple live apart. Spouses are said to be living apart if they no longer reside in the same dwelling, even though they may continue their relationship. A legal separation results when the parties separate and a court rules on the division of property, such as alimony or child support -- but does not grant a divorce.

SOLE CUSTODY

An arrangement whereby only one parent has physical and legal custody of a child and the other parent has visitation rights.

IRRECONCILABLE DIFFERENCES

Differences between spouses that are considered sufficiently severe to make married life together more or less impossible. In a number of states, irreconcilable... (more...)
Differences between spouses that are considered sufficiently severe to make married life together more or less impossible. In a number of states, irreconcilable differences is the accepted ground for a no-fault divorce. As a practical matter, courts seldom, if ever, inquire into what the differences actually are, and routinely grant a divorce as long as the party seeking the divorce says the couple has irreconcilable differences. Compare incompatibility; irremediable breakdown.

CHILD SUPPORT

The entitlement of all children to be supported by their parents until the children reach the age of majority or become emancipated -- usually by marriage, by e... (more...)
The entitlement of all children to be supported by their parents until the children reach the age of majority or become emancipated -- usually by marriage, by entry into the armed forces or by living independently. Many states also impose child support obligations on parents for a year or two beyond this point if the child is a full-time student. If the parents are living separately, they each must still support the children. Typically, the parent who has custody meets his or her support obligation through taking care of the child every day, while the other parent must make payments to the custodial parent on behalf of the child -- usually cash but sometimes other kinds of contributions. When parents divorce, the court almost always orders the non-custodial parent to pay the custodial parent an amount of child support fixed by state law. Sometimes, however, if the parents share physical custody more or less equally, the court will order the higher-income parent to make payments to the lower-income parent.

AMICUS CURIAE

Latin for 'friend of the court.' This term describes a person or organization that is not a party to a lawsuit as plaintiff or defendant but that has a strong i... (more...)
Latin for 'friend of the court.' This term describes a person or organization that is not a party to a lawsuit as plaintiff or defendant but that has a strong interest in the case and wants to get its two cents in. For example, the ACLU often submits materials to support a person who claims a violation of civil rights even though that person is represented by a lawyer.

CENSUS

An official count of the number of people living in a certain area, such as a district, city, county, state, or nation. The United States Constitution requires ... (more...)
An official count of the number of people living in a certain area, such as a district, city, county, state, or nation. The United States Constitution requires the federal government to perform a national census every ten years. The census includes information about the respondents' sex, age, family, and social and economic status.