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Richard Joseph Davis Lawyer

Richard Joseph Davis

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Traffic, DUI-DWI

Mr. Davis was born and raised in Portsmouth. He served on the staff of U.S. Senator Charles S. Robb then attended Nova Southeastern University Law Sch... (more)

Rocco Philip Thomas Columbus Lawyer

Rocco Philip Thomas Columbus

DUI-DWI, Traffic, Criminal

Rocco Columbus is a practicing lawyer in the state of Virginia who focuses on criminal cases. He has tried cases in the areas of assault, disorderly c... (more)

Daniel Jason Miller Lawyer

Daniel Jason Miller

Social Security -- Disability, Family Law, Child Support, DUI-DWI, Car Accident

Dan Miller was raised in Chesapeake, Virginia. He graduated from Norfolk Collegiate School in 1985, and graduated from Oxford College in 1987 with an ... (more)

Brian  Dunnigan Lawyer

Brian Dunnigan

VERIFIED
Criminal
Call us today for all your criminal and traffic needs.

Brian Dunnigan advises on all aspects of Traffic Law and Criminal Law across multiple Hampton Roads, Virginia jurisdictions, including the cities of C... (more)

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800-834-0010

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Rachel S. Gunther Lawyer

Rachel S. Gunther

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Estate, Accident & Injury, Divorce & Family Law, Real Estate, Criminal

Rachel Gunther P.C. has locations in Virginia Beach, VA and Hertford, NC. We take pride in representing clients throughout Hampton Roads, Virginia an... (more)

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757-671-3352

Paul Everette Thomas Lawyer

Paul Everette Thomas

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Divorce & Family Law, Traffic, DUI-DWI, Car Accident, Personal Injury
Determined, Experienced, and Effective.

Paul Thomas is an experienced lawyer proudly serving Virginia Beach, Virginia and the neighboring communities. He practices law in the following area... (more)

Monte E. Kuligowski Lawyer

Monte E. Kuligowski

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Personal Injury, Criminal, DUI-DWI, Traffic
Concentrating in DWI / DUI, traffic, criminal defense and Personal Injuries. Established in 1997.

Monte Kuligowski has been practicing law since 1997 and is the founder of the Legal Defense Center of the Law Office of Monte E. Kuligowski, P.C. in V... (more)

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800-786-6670

Diallo Kobie Morris Lawyer

Diallo Kobie Morris

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Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Traffic, Accident & Injury, Wills
Criminal, Traffic, Divorce, Custody, Visitation, Wills

Diallo Morris is a practicing lawyer in Chesapeake, VA. He currently is a partner at Morris, Crawford & Currin, P.C. with offices in Chesapeake and No... (more)

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800-881-5471

David D. Dickerson Lawyer

David D. Dickerson

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Accident & Injury, Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Traffic

David D. Dickerson Jr. is a practicing lawyer in the state of Virginia. Mr. Dickerson received his J.D. from the Regent University School of Law in 19... (more)

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800-947-5191

Robert Louis Wegman Lawyer

Robert Louis Wegman

VERIFIED
Criminal, Traffic
General practice law firm specilaizing in litigation matters

Robert Wegman is a Chesapeake Attorney serving the Hampton Roads (Tidewater), Virginia, area. Mr. Wegman, whose law practice is focused on the Tid... (more)

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800-932-6421

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LEGAL TERMS

SEARCH WARRANT

An order signed by a judge that directs owners of private property to allow the police to enter and search for items named in the warrant. The judge won't issue... (more...)
An order signed by a judge that directs owners of private property to allow the police to enter and search for items named in the warrant. The judge won't issue the warrant unless she has been convinced that there is probable cause for the search -- that reliable evidence shows that it's more likely than not that a crime has occurred and that the items sought by the police are connected with it and will be found at the location named in the warrant. In limited situations the police may search without a warrant, but they cannot use what they find at trial if the defense can show that there was no probable cause for the search.

BAIL BOND

The money posted by a 'bondsman' for a defendant who cannot afford his bail. The defendant pays a certain portion, usually 10%. If the defendant fails to appear... (more...)
The money posted by a 'bondsman' for a defendant who cannot afford his bail. The defendant pays a certain portion, usually 10%. If the defendant fails to appear for a court hearing, the judge can issue a warrant for his arrest and threaten to 'forfeit,' or keep, the money if the defendant doesn't appear soon. Usually, the bondsman will look for the defendant and bring him back, forcefully if necessary, in order to avoid losing the bail money.

HOMICIDE

The killing of one human being by the act or omission of another. The term applies to all such killings, whether criminal or not. Homicide is considered noncrim... (more...)
The killing of one human being by the act or omission of another. The term applies to all such killings, whether criminal or not. Homicide is considered noncriminal in a number of situations, including deaths as the result of war and putting someone to death by the valid sentence of a court. Killing may also be legally justified or excused, as it is in cases of self-defense or when someone is killed by another person who is attempting to prevent a violent felony. Criminal homicide occurs when a person purposely, knowingly, recklessly or negligently causes the death of another. Murder and manslaughter are both examples of criminal homicide.

CRIMINAL INSANITY

A mental defect or disease that makes it impossible for a person to understand the wrongfulness of his acts or, even if he understands them, to ditinguish right... (more...)
A mental defect or disease that makes it impossible for a person to understand the wrongfulness of his acts or, even if he understands them, to ditinguish right from wrong. Defendants who are criminally insane cannot be convicted of a crime, since criminal conduct involves the conscious intent to do wrong -- a choice that the criminally insane cannot meaningfully make. See also irresistible impulse; McNaghten Rule.

DISCOVERY

A formal investigation -- governed by court rules -- that is conducted before trial. Discovery allows one party to question other parties, and sometimes witness... (more...)
A formal investigation -- governed by court rules -- that is conducted before trial. Discovery allows one party to question other parties, and sometimes witnesses. It also allows one party to force the others to produce requested documents or other physical evidence. The most common types of discovery are interrogatories, consisting of written questions the other party must answer under penalty of perjury, and depositions, which involve an in-person session at which one party to a lawsuit has the opportunity to ask oral questions of the other party or her witnesses under oath while a written transcript is made by a court reporter. Other types of pretrial discovery consist of written requests to produce documents and requests for admissions, by which one party asks the other to admit or deny key facts in the case. One major purpose of discovery is to assess the strength or weakness of an opponent's case, with the idea of opening settlement talks. Another is to gather information to use at trial. Discovery is also present in criminal cases, in which by law the prosecutor must turn over to the defense any witness statements and any evidence that might tend to exonerate the defendant. Depending on the rules of the court, the defendant may also be obliged to share evidence with the prosecutor.

FALSE IMPRISONMENT

Intentionally restraining another person without having the legal right to do so. It's not necessary that physical force be used; threats or a show of apparent ... (more...)
Intentionally restraining another person without having the legal right to do so. It's not necessary that physical force be used; threats or a show of apparent authority are sufficient. False imprisonment is a misdemeanor and a tort (a civil wrong). If the perpetrator confines the victim for a substantial period of time (or moves him a significant distance) in order to commit a felony, the false imprisonment may become a kidnapping. People who are arrested and get the charges dropped, or are later acquitted, often think that they can sue the arresting officer for false imprisonment (also known as false arrest). These lawsuits rarely succeed: As long as the officer had probable cause to arrest the person, the officer will not be liable for a false arrest, even if it turns out later that the information the officer relied upon was incorrect.

ACQUITTAL

A decision by a judge or jury that a defendant in a criminal case is not guilty of a crime. An acquittal is not a finding of innocence; it is simply a conclusio... (more...)
A decision by a judge or jury that a defendant in a criminal case is not guilty of a crime. An acquittal is not a finding of innocence; it is simply a conclusion that the prosecution has not proved its case beyond a reasonable doubt.

INFORMED CONSENT

An agreement to do something or to allow something to happen, made with complete knowledge of all relevant facts, such as the risks involved or any available al... (more...)
An agreement to do something or to allow something to happen, made with complete knowledge of all relevant facts, such as the risks involved or any available alternatives. For example, a patient may give informed consent to medical treatment only after the healthcare professional has disclosed all possible risks involved in accepting or rejecting the treatment. A healthcare provider or facility may be held responsible for an injury caused by an undisclosed risk. In another context, a person accused of committing a crime cannot give up his constitutional rights--for example, to remain silent or to talk with an attorney--unless and until he has been informed of those rights, usually via the well-known Miranda warnings.

SPECIFIC INTENT

An intent to produce the precise consequences of the crime, including the intent to do the physical act that causes the consequences. For example, the crime of ... (more...)
An intent to produce the precise consequences of the crime, including the intent to do the physical act that causes the consequences. For example, the crime of larceny is the taking of the personal property of another with the intent to permanently deprive the other person of the property. A person is not guilty of larceny just because he took someone else's property; it must be proven that he took it with the purpose of keeping it permanently.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Magruder v. Com.

... Because the procedure provided in Code § 19.2-187.1 adequately protects a criminal defendant's rights under the Confrontation Clause and because the defendants in these appeals failed to utilize that procedure, we conclude that they waived the challenges under the ...

McCain v. Com.

... 335, 340, 288 SE2d 475, 478 (1982). Under well-settled principles of law, police officers may stop a person for the purpose of investigating possible criminal behavior even though no probable cause exists for an arrest. Terry, 392 US at 22, 88 S.Ct. 1868. ...

McMorris v. Com.

... This was all contemporaneous. Therefore[,] the robbery statute applies." In refusing McMorris' petition for appeal, the Court of Appeals concluded that the evidence established that McMorris shared the criminal intent of those who did steal Ottey's telephone and other items. ...