Philadelphia Construction Lawyer, Pennsylvania


Includes: Construction Contracts, Construction Liens, Housing & Construction Defects

Edward J. Tuite

Construction, Professional Malpractice, Ethics, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

John S. Tucci

Products Liability, Legal Malpractice, Housing & Construction Defects, Traffic
Status:  In Good Standing           

Christopher N. Santoro

Products Liability, Medical Malpractice, Toxic Mold & Tort, Construction
Status:  In Good Standing           

J. Bradford McIlvain

Construction, Environmental Law, Litigation
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Brian M. Spiegel

Construction, Professional Malpractice, Housing & Construction Defects
Status:  In Good Standing           

Douglas J. Kent

Products Liability, Bad Faith Insurance, Construction, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

Bradley D. Remick

Products Liability, Construction, Personal Injury, Litigation
Status:  In Good Standing           

Lawrence J. Bistany

Arbitration, Bad Faith Insurance, Corporate, Construction
Status:  In Good Standing           

Anthony L. Miscioscia

Bad Faith Insurance, Corporate, Construction, Employment Discrimination
Status:  In Good Standing           

Stewart R. Singer

Products Liability, Toxic Mold & Tort, Construction, Professional Malpractice
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

EVIDENCE

The many types of information presented to a judge or jury designed to convince them of the truth or falsity of key facts. Evidence typically includes testimony... (more...)
The many types of information presented to a judge or jury designed to convince them of the truth or falsity of key facts. Evidence typically includes testimony of witnesses, documents, photographs, items of damaged property, government records, videos and laboratory reports. Rules that are as strict as they are quirky and technical govern what types of evidence can be properly admitted as part of a trial. For example, the hearsay rule purports to prevent secondhand testimony of the 'he said, she said' variety, but the existence of dozens of exceptions often means that hairsplitting lawyers can find a way to introduce such testimony into evidence. See also admissible evidence, inadmissible evidence.

HOLD HARMLESS

In a contract, a promise by one party not to hold the other party responsible if the other party carries out the contract in a way that causes damage to the fir... (more...)
In a contract, a promise by one party not to hold the other party responsible if the other party carries out the contract in a way that causes damage to the first party. For example, many leases include a hold harmless clause in which the tenant agrees not to sue the landlord if the tenant is injured due to the landlord's failure to maintain the premises. In most states, these clauses are illegal in residential tenancies, but may be upheld in commercial settings.

ARBITRATION

A non-court procedure for resolving disputes using one or more neutral third parties -- called the arbitrator or arbitration panel. Arbitration uses rules of ev... (more...)
A non-court procedure for resolving disputes using one or more neutral third parties -- called the arbitrator or arbitration panel. Arbitration uses rules of evidence and procedure that are less formal than those followed in trial courts, which usually leads to a faster, less-expensive resolution. There are many types of arbitration in common use: Binding arbitration is similar to a court proceeding in that the arbitrator has the power to impose a decision, although this is sometimes limited by agreement -- for example, in 'hi-lo arbitration' the parties may agree in advance to a maximum and minimum award. In non-binding arbitration, the arbitrator can recommend but not impose a decision. Many contracts -- including those imposed on customers by many financial and healthcare organizations -- require mandatory arbitration in the event of a dispute. This may be reasonable when the arbitrator really is neutral, but is justifiably criticized when the large company that writes the contract is able to influence the choice of the arbitrator.

TANGIBLE PERSONAL PROPERTY

Personal property that can be felt or touched. Examples include furniture, cars, jewelry and artwork. However, cash and checking accounts are not tangible perso... (more...)
Personal property that can be felt or touched. Examples include furniture, cars, jewelry and artwork. However, cash and checking accounts are not tangible personal property. The law is unsettled as to whether computer data is tangible personal property. Compare intangible property.

STATUTE OF LIMITATIONS

The legally prescribed time limit in which a lawsuit must be filed. Statutes of limitation differ depending on the type of legal claim, and often the state. For... (more...)
The legally prescribed time limit in which a lawsuit must be filed. Statutes of limitation differ depending on the type of legal claim, and often the state. For example, many states require that a personal injury lawsuit be filed within one year from the date of injury -- or in some instances, from the date when it should reasonably have been discovered -- but some allow two years. Similarly, claims based on a written contract must be filed in court within four years from the date the contract was broken in some states and five years in others. Statute of limitations rules apply to cases filed in all courts, including federal court.

LICENSE (OF INVENTION, COPYRIGHT OR TRADEMARK)

A contract giving written permission to use an invention, creative work or trademark. A license provides a way to make money from your invention or creative wor... (more...)
A contract giving written permission to use an invention, creative work or trademark. A license provides a way to make money from your invention or creative work without having to manufacture and sell copies yourself. By licensing an invention or work to a company, you get money (often in the form of royalties) in return for allowing the company to use, produce and sell copies of your invention or work in the marketplace.

TORTIOUS INTERFERENCE

The causing of harm by disrupting something that belongs to someone else -- for example, interfering with a contractual relationship so that one party fails to ... (more...)
The causing of harm by disrupting something that belongs to someone else -- for example, interfering with a contractual relationship so that one party fails to deliver goods on time.

ILLUSORY PROMISE

A promise that pledges nothing, because it is vague or because the promisor can choose whether or not to honor it. Such promises are not legally binding. For ex... (more...)
A promise that pledges nothing, because it is vague or because the promisor can choose whether or not to honor it. Such promises are not legally binding. For example, if you get a new job and promise to work for three years, unless you resign sooner, you haven't made a valid contract and can resign or be fired at any time.

COOLING-OFF RULE

A rule that allows you to cancel a contract within a specified time period (typically three days) after signing it. Federal cooling-off rules apply this three-d... (more...)
A rule that allows you to cancel a contract within a specified time period (typically three days) after signing it. Federal cooling-off rules apply this three-day grace period to sales made door-to-door and anywhere other than a seller's normal place of business, such as at a trade show. Another federal cooling-off rule lets you cancel a home improvement loan or second mortgage within three days of signing. Various states have cooling-off rules that sometimes apply even longer cancellation periods to specific types of sales, such as dancing lessons and timeshares.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Cove Centre, Inc. v. WESTHAFER CONSTRUCTION, INC.

¶ 1 Westhafer Construction, Inc. (Westhafer) appeals the judgment entered in favor of Cove Centre, Inc. (Cove Centre) following imposition of discovery sanctions by the trial court. The court's order declared requests for admission to be admitted, precluded expert testimony, and ...

MALT BEV. DIST. v. Liquor Control Bd.

... It reasoned that such construction would lead to the absurd result of citing a licensee for not offering alcohol to be ingested at the site, when the express purpose of the regulatory scheme is to restrict the sale of alcohol. See Application of El Rancho Grande Inc., 496 Pa. ...

Commonwealth v. Brown

... 1999). This issue of statutory construction is a pure question of law, subject to plenary and de novo review. Commonwealth v. Bradley, 834 A.2d 1127, 1131 (Pa. 2003). ... 1995). Thus, our task is one of statutory interpretation. The rules of statutory construction are well settled: ...

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