Port Charlotte Estate Lawyer, Florida


Erin A. Itts

Real Estate, Wills & Probate, Estate, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Susan M Bodden

Mediation, Estate, Divorce & Family Law, Elder Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  15 Years

Ellie K Harris

Commercial Real Estate, Trusts, Guardianships & Conservatorships, Elder Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Ernest William Sturges

Commercial Real Estate, Social Security, Estate Planning, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Carrie Marie Leontitsis

Commercial Real Estate, Estate Planning, Guardianships & Conservatorships, Elder Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Michael Wilson

Commercial Real Estate, Social Security, Estate Planning, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Mark Martella

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           

James W. Mallonee

Construction, Trusts, Elder Law, Contract
Status:  In Good Standing           

Leslie Tar

Wills, Estate Planning, Estate, Elder Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  21 Years

Leslie Tar

Wills, Estate Planning, Estate, Elder Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  21 Years

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

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By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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Lawyer.com can help you easily and quickly find Port Charlotte Estate Lawyers and Port Charlotte Estate Law Firms. Refine your search by specific Estate practice areas such as Estate Planning, Trusts, Wills & Probate and Power of Attorney matters.

LEGAL TERMS

BANKRUPTCY ESTATE

All of the property you own when you file for bankruptcy, except for most pensions and educational trusts. The trustee technically takes control of your bankrup... (more...)
All of the property you own when you file for bankruptcy, except for most pensions and educational trusts. The trustee technically takes control of your bankruptcy estate for the duration of your case.

RESIDUARY ESTATE

The property that remains in a deceased person's estate after all specific gifts are made, and all debts, taxes, administrative fees, probate costs, and court c... (more...)
The property that remains in a deceased person's estate after all specific gifts are made, and all debts, taxes, administrative fees, probate costs, and court costs are paid. The residuary estate also includes any gifts under a will that fail or lapse. For example, Connie's will leaves her house and all its furnishings to Andrew, her VW bug to her friend Carl, and the remainder of her property (the residuary estate) to her sister Sara. She doesn't name any alternate beneficiaries. Carl dies before Connie. The VW bug becomes part of the residuary estate and passes to Sara, along with all of Connie's property other than the house and furnishings. Also called the residual estate or residue.

BYPASS TRUST

A trust designed to lessen a family's overall estate tax liability. An AB trust is the most popular kind of bypass trust.

DISINHERIT

To deliberately prevent someone from inheriting something. This is usually done by a provision in a will stating that someone who would ordinarily inherit prope... (more...)
To deliberately prevent someone from inheriting something. This is usually done by a provision in a will stating that someone who would ordinarily inherit property -- a close family member, for example -- should not receive it. In most states, you cannot completely disinherit your spouse; a surviving spouse has the right to claim a portion (usually one-third to one-half) of the deceased spouse's estate. With a few exceptions, however, you can expressly disinherit children.

ACCUMULATION TRUST

A trust in which the income is retained and not paid out to beneficiaries until certain conditions are met. For example, if Uncle Pierre creates a trust for Nic... (more...)
A trust in which the income is retained and not paid out to beneficiaries until certain conditions are met. For example, if Uncle Pierre creates a trust for Nick's benefit but stipulates that Nick will not get a penny until he gets a Ph.D. in French; Nick is the beneficiary of an accumulation trust.

CREDIT SHELTER TRUST

See AB trust.

AUGMENTED ESTATE

In general terms, an augmented estate consists of property owned by both a deceased person and his or her spouse. The concept of the augmented estate is used on... (more...)
In general terms, an augmented estate consists of property owned by both a deceased person and his or her spouse. The concept of the augmented estate is used only in some states. Its value is calculated only if a surviving spouse declines whatever he or she was left by will and instead claims a share of the deceased spouse's estate. (This is called taking against the will.) The amount of this 'statutory share' or 'elective share' depends on state law.

INHERIT

To receive property from someone who has died. Traditionally, the word 'inherit' applied only when one received property from a relative who died without a will... (more...)
To receive property from someone who has died. Traditionally, the word 'inherit' applied only when one received property from a relative who died without a will. Currently, however, the word is used whenever someone receives property from the estate of a deceased person.

PROVING A WILL

Convincing a probate court that a document is truly the deceased person's will. Usually this is a simple formality that the executor or administrator easily sat... (more...)
Convincing a probate court that a document is truly the deceased person's will. Usually this is a simple formality that the executor or administrator easily satisfies by showing that the will was signed and dated by the deceased person in front of two or more witnesses. When the will is holographic -- that is, completely handwritten by the deceased and not witnessed, it is still valid in many states if the executor can produce relatives and friends to testify that the handwriting is that of the deceased.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

In re Estate of McKibbin

In re ESTATE of Loyette D. McKIBBIN, deceased. Larry H. McKibbin, as Personal Representative of the Estate of Loyette D. McKibbin, Appellant, v. Alterra Health Care Corporation a/k/a Alterra Healthcare Corporation; Beth M. Guinn a/k/a Beth Marie Waters Guinn; Tammie ...

Estate of Johnson v. Badger Acquisition

Failing to appropriately monitor the dispensing of medication for Norma J. Johnson; failing to appropriately monitor the proximity in which the same medication was dispensed for Norma J. Johnson; failing to adequately monitor Norma J. Johnson's medication administration; ...

SOVEREIGN HEALTHCARE v. Estate of Huerta

SOVEREIGN HEALTHCARE OF TAMPA, LLC, a/k/a Sovereign Healthcare of Tampa, LLC, d/b/a Sovereign Healthcare of Tampa (as to Bayshore Pointe Nursing & Rehab Center), Appellant, v. The ESTATE OF Florinda HUERTA, by and through Dennis HUERTA, ...