River Edge Family Law Lawyer, New Jersey

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Includes: Collaborative Law, Domestic Violence & Neglect, Paternity, Prenuptial Agreements

Marianne Quinn

Family Law, Divorce, Real Estate, Litigation
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Michael J. Epstein

Mass Torts, Family Law, Corporate, Products Liability, Medical Malpractice
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James B. Seplowitz

Criminal, DUI-DWI, Domestic Violence & Neglect, Felony
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Kit Elaine Calligaro

Family Law, Divorce, Farms, Child Support
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Brenda H. Rothman

Real Estate, Family Law, Criminal, Personal Injury
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Roger B. Radol

Wills & Probate, Family Law, Franchising, Banking & Finance
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Richard T. Rapone

Wills & Probate, Estate Planning, Family Law, Personal Injury
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William F. Rupp

Land Use & Zoning, Government Contract, Wills & Probate, Family Law
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Bart J. Eagle

Corporate, Estate Planning, Family Law, Litigation
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Joanna D. Brick

Family Law
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LEGAL TERMS

STIRPES

A term used in wills that refers to descendants of a common ancestor or branch of a family.

INTERLOCUTORY DECREE

A court judgment that is not final until the judge decides other matters in the case or until enough time has passed to see if the interim decision is working. ... (more...)
A court judgment that is not final until the judge decides other matters in the case or until enough time has passed to see if the interim decision is working. In the past, interlocutory decrees were most often used in divorces. The terms of the divorce were set out in an interlocutory decree, which would become final only after a waiting period. The purpose of the waiting period was to allow the couple time to reconcile. They rarely did, however, so most states no longer use interlocutory decrees of divorce.

PHYSICAL INCAPACITY

The inability of a spouse to engage in sexual intercourse with the other spouse. In some states, physical incapacity is a ground for an annulment or fault divor... (more...)
The inability of a spouse to engage in sexual intercourse with the other spouse. In some states, physical incapacity is a ground for an annulment or fault divorce, assuming the incapacity was not disclosed to the other spouse before the marriage.

ADOPT

(1) To assume the legal relationship of parent to another person's child. See also adoption. (2) To approve or accept something -- for example, a legislative bo... (more...)
(1) To assume the legal relationship of parent to another person's child. See also adoption. (2) To approve or accept something -- for example, a legislative body may adopt a law or an amendment, a government agency may adopt a regulation or a party to a lawsuit may adopt a particular argument.

NEXT OF KIN

The closest relatives, as defined by state law, of a deceased person. Most states recognize the spouse and the nearest blood relatives as next of kin.

FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT (FMLA)

A federal law that requires employers to provide an employee with 12 weeks of unpaid leave during a year's time for the birth or adoption of a child, family hea... (more...)
A federal law that requires employers to provide an employee with 12 weeks of unpaid leave during a year's time for the birth or adoption of a child, family health needs or personal illness. The employer must allow the employee to return to the same position or a position similar to that held before taking the leave. There are exceptions to the FMLA: the most notable is that only employers with 50 or more employees are covered--about half the workforce.

ACCOMPANYING RELATIVE

An immediate family member of someone who immigrates to the United States. In most cases, a person who is eligible to receive some type of visa or green card ca... (more...)
An immediate family member of someone who immigrates to the United States. In most cases, a person who is eligible to receive some type of visa or green card can also obtain green cards or similar visas for accompanying relatives. Accompanying relatives include spouses and unmarried children under the age of 21.

SEPARATION

A situation in which the partners in a married couple live apart. Spouses are said to be living apart if they no longer reside in the same dwelling, even though... (more...)
A situation in which the partners in a married couple live apart. Spouses are said to be living apart if they no longer reside in the same dwelling, even though they may continue their relationship. A legal separation results when the parties separate and a court rules on the division of property, such as alimony or child support -- but does not grant a divorce.

HEAD OF HOUSEHOLD

A person who supports and maintains, in one household, one or more people who are closely related to him by blood, marriage or adoption. Under federal income ta... (more...)
A person who supports and maintains, in one household, one or more people who are closely related to him by blood, marriage or adoption. Under federal income tax law, you are eligible for favorable tax treatment as the head of household only if you are unmarried and you manage a household which is the principal residence (for more than half of the year) of dependent children or other dependent relatives. Under bankruptcy homestead and exemption laws, the terms householder and 'head of household' mean the same thing. Examples include a single woman supporting her disabled sister and her own children or a bachelor supporting his parents. Many states consider a single person supporting only himself to be a head of household as well.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Fawzy v. Fawzy

... We note that there is no express bar to the arbitration of family law matters in the Arbitration Act. Further, in Faherty v. Faherty, we long ago approved the arbitration of some family law issues, alimony and child support in particular. 97 NJ 99, 108-09, 477 A.2d 1257 (1984). ...

NEW JERSEY DIV. OF YOUTH AND FAMILY SERVICES v. AR

... III. On this appeal we must afford great deference to the Family Part's findings of fact and conclusions of law based on those findings. NJ Div. of Youth & Family Servs. v. GL, 191 NJ 596, 605, 926 A.2d 320 (2007); NJ Div. of Youth & Family Servs. ...

NJ DIV. v. MC III

... III. We turn now to address whether there was sufficient credible evidence to support the trial court's findings. In a non-jury civil action, the trial court shall make findings of fact and state its conclusions of law. ... of Youth & Family Servs. ...