Tupelo Estate Lawyer, Mississippi

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Brent  McBride Lawyer

Brent McBride

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Criminal, Estate, Divorce & Family Law

W Brent McBride is a practicing lawyer in the state of Mississippi.

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Henderson M. Jones

Family Law, Medical Malpractice, Wills & Probate, Bad Faith Insurance
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Jason D. Herring

Family Law, Medical Malpractice, Wills & Probate, Bad Faith Insurance, Slip & Fall Accident
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  24 Years

Sylvia Savini Owen

Criminal, Estate, Traffic
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  26 Years
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E Payne Atkinson

Gift Taxation, Commercial Real Estate, Health Care Other, Trusts
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  21 Years

Paige C Bush-Scruggs

Real Estate, Lawsuit & Dispute, Estate, Bankruptcy & Debt
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  19 Years

Maria House

Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  13 Years

Maria House

Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  13 Years

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Lawyer.com can help you easily and quickly find Tupelo Estate Lawyers and Tupelo Estate Law Firms. Refine your search by specific Estate practice areas such as Estate Planning, Trusts, Wills & Probate and Power of Attorney matters.

LEGAL TERMS

LAPSE

Under a will, the failure of a gift of property. A gift lapses when the beneficiary dies before the person who made the will, and no alternate has been named. S... (more...)
Under a will, the failure of a gift of property. A gift lapses when the beneficiary dies before the person who made the will, and no alternate has been named. Some states have anti-lapse statutes, which prevent gifts to relatives of the deceased person from lapsing unless the relative has no heirs of his or her own. A lapsed gift becomes part of the residuary estate.

GRANTOR

Someone who creates a trust. Also called a trustor or settlor.

TESTAMENTARY TRUST

A trust created by a will, effective only upon the death of the willmaker.

SECONDARY MEANING

In trademark law, a mark that is not inherently distinctive becomes protected after developing a 'secondary meaning': great public recognition through long use ... (more...)
In trademark law, a mark that is not inherently distinctive becomes protected after developing a 'secondary meaning': great public recognition through long use and exposure in the marketplace. For example, though first names are not generally considered inherently distinctive, Ben & Jerry's Ice Cream has become so well known that it is now entitled to maximum trademark protection.

STATUTORY SHARE

The portion of a deceased person's estate that a spouse is entitled to claim under state law. The statutory share is usually one-third or one-half of the deceas... (more...)
The portion of a deceased person's estate that a spouse is entitled to claim under state law. The statutory share is usually one-third or one-half of the deceased spouse's property, but in some states the exact amount of the spouse's share depends on whether or not the couple has young children and, in a few states, on how long the couple was married. In most states, if the deceased spouse left a will, the surviving spouse must choose either what the will provides or the statutory share. Sometimes the statutory share is known by its more arcane legal name, dower and curtesy, or as a forced or elective share.

ADMINISTRATRIX

An outdated term for a female administrator -- the person appointed by a court to handle probate on behalf of someone who died without a will. Now, whether male... (more...)
An outdated term for a female administrator -- the person appointed by a court to handle probate on behalf of someone who died without a will. Now, whether male or female, this person is called the administrator.

PERSONAL PROPERTY

All property other than land and buildings attached to land. Cars, bank accounts, wages, securities, a small business, furniture, insurance policies, jewelry, p... (more...)
All property other than land and buildings attached to land. Cars, bank accounts, wages, securities, a small business, furniture, insurance policies, jewelry, patents, pets and season baseball tickets are all examples of personal property. Personal property may also be called personal effects, movable property, goods and chattel, and personalty. Compare real estate.

DISINHERIT

To deliberately prevent someone from inheriting something. This is usually done by a provision in a will stating that someone who would ordinarily inherit prope... (more...)
To deliberately prevent someone from inheriting something. This is usually done by a provision in a will stating that someone who would ordinarily inherit property -- a close family member, for example -- should not receive it. In most states, you cannot completely disinherit your spouse; a surviving spouse has the right to claim a portion (usually one-third to one-half) of the deceased spouse's estate. With a few exceptions, however, you can expressly disinherit children.

INTESTATE SUCCESSION

The method by which property is distributed when a person dies without a valid will. Each state's law provides that the property be distributed to the closest s... (more...)
The method by which property is distributed when a person dies without a valid will. Each state's law provides that the property be distributed to the closest surviving relatives. In most states, the surviving spouse, children, parents, siblings, nieces and nephews, and next of kin inherit, in that order.