Washington Estate Lawyer, District of Columbia

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Steve  Larson-Jackson Lawyer

Steve Larson-Jackson

VERIFIED
Estate Planning, Trusts, Wills, Business

Steve Larson-Jackson is an Estate Lawyer proudly serving Washington, DC and the neighboring communities.

Charles Arthur Ray Lawyer

Charles Arthur Ray

VERIFIED
Tax, Real Estate, Corporate, Business & Trade, Wills & Probate

Charles A. Ray, Jr. concentrates his practice in Federal Tax Law, representing both individuals and corporations. His impeccable resume reveals a prov... (more)

Skyler Stuart Showell Lawyer

Skyler Stuart Showell

VERIFIED
Bankruptcy & Debt, Employment, Estate, Lawsuit & Dispute, Real Estate

Business Lawyer proudly serving Washington, DC and the surrounding areas.

Kerri M Castellini Lawyer

Kerri M Castellini

Trusts, Power of Attorney, Wills & Probate, Elder Law, Estate

Kerri Castellini is a lawyer in of Washington D.C. who focuses on trusts and estates. She has also tried cases involving guardianship, power of atto... (more)

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Seth Jay Price Lawyer

Seth Jay Price

Accident & Injury, Criminal, Immigration, Estate

H. Carter Hood

Estate Planning, Tax
Status:  In Good Standing           

Lisa Milot

Tax, Estate Planning, Business Organization, Business
Status:  In Good Standing           

Eric R. Fox

Corporate Tax, Estate Planning, International Tax, Partnerships
Status:  In Good Standing           

Robert S. Bullock

Family Law, Wills & Probate, Government Agencies, Health Care
Status:  In Good Standing           

John D Bates

Corporate Tax, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided may not be privileged or confidential.

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Lawyer.com can help you easily and quickly find Washington Estate Lawyers and Washington Estate Law Firms. Refine your search by specific Estate practice areas such as Estate Planning, Trusts, Wills & Probate and Power of Attorney matters.

LEGAL TERMS

GRANT DEED

A deed containing an implied promise that the person transfering the property actually owns the title and that it is not encumbered in any way, except as descri... (more...)
A deed containing an implied promise that the person transfering the property actually owns the title and that it is not encumbered in any way, except as described in the deed. This is the most commonly used type of deed. Compare quitclaim deed.

TRUST DEED

The most common method of financing real estate purchases in California (most other states use mortgages). The trust deed transfers the title to the property to... (more...)
The most common method of financing real estate purchases in California (most other states use mortgages). The trust deed transfers the title to the property to a trustee -- often a title company -- who holds it as security for a loan. When the loan is paid off, the title is transferred to the borrower. The trustee will not become involved in the arrangement unless the borrower defaults on the loan. At that point, the trustee can sell the property and pay the lender from the proceeds.

BYPASS TRUST

A trust designed to lessen a family's overall estate tax liability. An AB trust is the most popular kind of bypass trust.

ESTATE TAXES

Taxes imposed by the state or federal government on property as it passes from the dead to the living. All property you own, whatever the form of ownership, and... (more...)
Taxes imposed by the state or federal government on property as it passes from the dead to the living. All property you own, whatever the form of ownership, and whether or not it goes through probate after your death, is subject to federal estate tax. Currently, however, federal estate tax is due only if your property is worth at least $2 million when you die. The estate tax is scheduled to be repealed for one year, in 2010, but Congress will probably make the repeal (or a very high exempt amount) permanent. Any property left to a surviving spouse (if he or she is a U.S. citizen) or a tax-exempt charity is exempt from federal estate taxes. Many states now also impose their own estate taxes or inheritance taxes.

FAMILY POT TRUST

See pot trust.

PROPERTY CONTROL TRUST

Any trust that imposes limits or controls over the rights of trust beneficiaries. These trusts include (1) special needs trusts designed to assist people who ha... (more...)
Any trust that imposes limits or controls over the rights of trust beneficiaries. These trusts include (1) special needs trusts designed to assist people who have special physical, emotional or other requirements, (2) spendthrift trusts designed to prevent a beneficiary from wasting the trust principal; and (3) sprinkling trusts that allow the trustee to decide how to distribute trust income or principal among the beneficiaries.

NET ESTATE

The value of all property owned at death less liabilities or debts.

INTESTATE SUCCESSION

The method by which property is distributed when a person dies without a valid will. Each state's law provides that the property be distributed to the closest s... (more...)
The method by which property is distributed when a person dies without a valid will. Each state's law provides that the property be distributed to the closest surviving relatives. In most states, the surviving spouse, children, parents, siblings, nieces and nephews, and next of kin inherit, in that order.

TRUST MERGER

Under a trust, the situation that occurs when the sole trustee and the sole beneficiary are the same person or institution. Then, there's no longer the separati... (more...)
Under a trust, the situation that occurs when the sole trustee and the sole beneficiary are the same person or institution. Then, there's no longer the separation between the trustee's legal ownership of trust property from the beneficiary's interest. The trust 'merges' and ceases to exist.