Washington Divorce & Family Law Lawyer, District of Columbia

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Robert Richard Castro Lawyer

Robert Richard Castro

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Accident & Injury, DUI-DWI, Car Accident, Criminal, Divorce & Family Law

Robert Richard Castro is an attorney currently serving the people of Washington, D.C. and Maryland. A partner in a firm in Waldorf, Maryland, he is pr... (more)

Mary  Paloger Lawyer

Mary Paloger

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Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Immigration, Business, Tax

Mary Paloger is a practicing lawyer in the states of District of Columbia and Maryland specializing in Divorce & Family Law. Mary Paloger received her... (more)

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Johnnie Daniel Bond Lawyer

Johnnie Daniel Bond

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Accident & Injury, Divorce & Family Law, Felony, Misdemeanor, DUI-DWI
Personal Injury Attorney

Clients who work with our attorneys at Bond Law for their legal needs are all happy to report that they received superior dedication. This is because ... (more)

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800-953-1651

Dan N. Godfrey Lawyer

Dan N. Godfrey

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Immigration, Personal Injury, Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Arbitration

Dan Godfrey is a practicing lawyer in the state of Virginia specializing in Immigration. Mr. Godfrey received his J.D. from American University Washin... (more)

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Aaron Joseph Christoff

Adoption, Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support, Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           

Gregory R. Nugent

Family Law, Divorce, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Nicole C. Dillard

Employment, Family Law, Corporate, Business Organization
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Glenn C. Lewis

Farms, Divorce, Family Law
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John M. Clifford

Estate Planning, Employment, Family Law, Contract
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Madeha Chaudry Dastgir

Estate Planning, Family Law, Intellectual Property, Litigation
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LEGAL TERMS

CHILD

(1) A son or daughter of any age, sometimes including biological offspring, unborn children, adopted children, stepchildren, foster children and children born o... (more...)
(1) A son or daughter of any age, sometimes including biological offspring, unborn children, adopted children, stepchildren, foster children and children born outside of marriage. (2) A person under an age specified by law, often 14 or 16. For example, state law may require a person to be over the age of 14 to make a valid will, or may define the crime of statutory rape as sex with a person under the age of 16. In this sense, a child can be distinguished from a minor, who is a person under the age of 18 in most states. A person below the specified legal age who is married is often considered an adult rather than a child. See also emancipation.

ARREARAGES

Overdue alimony or child support payments. In recent years, state laws have made it difficult to impossible to get rid of arrearages; they can't be discharged i... (more...)
Overdue alimony or child support payments. In recent years, state laws have made it difficult to impossible to get rid of arrearages; they can't be discharged in bankruptcy, and courts usually will not retroactively cancel them. A spouse or parent who falls on tough times and is unable to make payments should request a temporary modification of the payments before the arrearages build up.

MARRIAGE CERTIFICATE

A document that provides proof of a marriage, typically issued to the newlyweds a few weeks after they file for the certificate in a county office. Most states ... (more...)
A document that provides proof of a marriage, typically issued to the newlyweds a few weeks after they file for the certificate in a county office. Most states require both spouses, the person who officiated the marriage and one or two witnesses to sign the marriage certificate; often this is done just after the ceremony.

LEGAL CUSTODY

The right and obligation to make decisions about a child's upbringing, including schooling and medical care. Many states typically have both parents share legal... (more...)
The right and obligation to make decisions about a child's upbringing, including schooling and medical care. Many states typically have both parents share legal custody of a child. Compare physical custody.

IN CAMERA

Latin for 'in chambers.' A legal proceeding is 'in camera' when a hearing is held before the judge in her private chambers or when the public is excluded from t... (more...)
Latin for 'in chambers.' A legal proceeding is 'in camera' when a hearing is held before the judge in her private chambers or when the public is excluded from the courtroom. Proceedings are often held in camera to protect victims and witnesses from public exposure, especially if the victim or witness is a child. There is still, however, a record made of the proceeding, typically by a court stenographer. The judge may decide to seal this record if the material is extremely sensitive or likely to prejudice one side or the other.

DIVORCE AGREEMENT

An agreement made by a divorcing couple regarding the division of property, custody and visitation of the children, alimony or child support. The agreement must... (more...)
An agreement made by a divorcing couple regarding the division of property, custody and visitation of the children, alimony or child support. The agreement must be put in writing, signed by the parties and accepted by the court. It becomes part of the divorce decree and does away with the necessity of having a trial on the issues covered by the agreement. A divorce agreement may also be called a marital settlement agreement, marital termination agreement or settlement agreement.

NO-FAULT DIVORCE

Any divorce in which the spouse who wants to split up does not have to accuse the other of wrongdoing, but can simply state that the couple no longer gets along... (more...)
Any divorce in which the spouse who wants to split up does not have to accuse the other of wrongdoing, but can simply state that the couple no longer gets along. Until no-fault divorce arrived in the 1970s, the only way a person could get a divorce was to prove that the other spouse was at fault for the marriage not working. No-fault divorces are usually granted for reasons such as incompatibility, irreconcilable differences, or irretrievable or irremediable breakdown of the marriage. Also, some states allow incurable insanity as a basis for a no-fault divorce. Compare fault divorce.

CUSTODIAL INTERFERENCE

The taking of a child from his or her parent with the intent to interfere with that parent's physical custody of the child. This is a crime in most states, even... (more...)
The taking of a child from his or her parent with the intent to interfere with that parent's physical custody of the child. This is a crime in most states, even if the taker also has custody rights.

FMLA

See Family and Medical Leave Act.