Blue Springs Divorce & Family Law Lawyer, Missouri

Sponsored Law Firm


James R. Piedimonte Lawyer

James R. Piedimonte

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Family Law, Paternity, Child Custody, Child Support

James Piedimonte is one of the most experienced family law attorneys in Jackson County with over 35 years experience in child custody and divorce lit... (more)

Paul E. Evans

Accident & Injury, Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Wills & Probate, Wrongful Death
Status:  In Good Standing           

Ted Kapke

Business Organization, Family Law, Eminent Domain, Collection
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Robert D Murphy

Business Organization, Criminal, Estate Planning, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT
Speak with Lawyer.com

Brandi Morris

Dispute Resolution, Alimony & Spousal Support, Adoption, Administrative Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

L. Clay Barton

Family Law, Business Organization, Banking & Finance, Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           

David P Kimminau

Farms, Collaborative Law, Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support
Status:  In Good Standing           

R. Scott Richart

Juvenile Law, Other, Family Law, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

John W. Dennis

Farms, Family Law, Alimony & Spousal Support, Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           

Michael S.J. Albano

Family Law, Divorce & Family Law, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-620-0900

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-620-0900

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-620-0900

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.


Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

TIPS

Lawyer.com can help you easily and quickly find Blue Springs Divorce & Family Law Lawyers and Blue Springs Divorce & Family Law Firms. Refine your search by specific Divorce & Family Law practice areas such as Adoption, Child Custody, Child Support, Divorce and Family Law matters.

LEGAL TERMS

POT TRUST

A trust for children in which the trustee decides how to spend money on each child, taking money out of the trust to meet each child's specific needs. One impor... (more...)
A trust for children in which the trustee decides how to spend money on each child, taking money out of the trust to meet each child's specific needs. One important advantage of a pot trust over separate trusts is that it allows the trustee to provide for one child's unforeseen need, such as a medical emergency. But a pot trust can also make the trustee's life difficult by requiring choices about disbursing funds to the various children. A pot trust ends when the youngest child reaches a certain age, usually 18 or 21.

SOLE CUSTODY

An arrangement whereby only one parent has physical and legal custody of a child and the other parent has visitation rights.

AGE OF MAJORITY

Adulthood in the eyes of the law. After reaching the age of majority, a person is permitted to vote, make a valid will, enter into binding contracts, enlist in ... (more...)
Adulthood in the eyes of the law. After reaching the age of majority, a person is permitted to vote, make a valid will, enter into binding contracts, enlist in the armed forces and purchase alcohol. Also, parents may stop making child support payments when a child reaches the age of majority. In most states the age of majority is 18, but this varies depending on the activity. For example, in some states people are allowed to vote when they reach the age of eighteen, but can't purchase alcohol until they're 21.

FOSTER CARE

Court-ordered care provided to children who are unable to live in their own homes, usually because their parents have abused or neglected them. Foster parents h... (more...)
Court-ordered care provided to children who are unable to live in their own homes, usually because their parents have abused or neglected them. Foster parents have a legal responsibility to care for their foster children, but do not have all the rights of a biological parent--for example, they may have limited rights to discipline the children, to raise them according to a certain religion or to authorize non-emergency medical procedures for them. The foster parents do not become the child's legal parents unless the biological parents' rights are terminated by a court and the foster parents adopt the child. This is not typically encouraged, as the goal of foster care is to provide temporary support for the children until they can be returned to their parents. See also foster child.

QMSCO

See Qualified Medical Child Support Order.

ATTRACTIVE NUISANCE

Something on a piece of property that attracts children but also endangers their safety. For example, unfenced swimming pools, open pits, farm equipment and aba... (more...)
Something on a piece of property that attracts children but also endangers their safety. For example, unfenced swimming pools, open pits, farm equipment and abandoned refrigerators have all qualified as attractive nuisances.

NEXT OF KIN

The closest relatives, as defined by state law, of a deceased person. Most states recognize the spouse and the nearest blood relatives as next of kin.

MARITAL TERMINATION AGREEMENT

See divorce agreement.

FAULT DIVORCE

A tradition that required one spouse to prove that the other spouse was legally at fault, to obtain a divorce. The 'innocent' spouse was then granted the divorc... (more...)
A tradition that required one spouse to prove that the other spouse was legally at fault, to obtain a divorce. The 'innocent' spouse was then granted the divorce from the 'guilty' spouse. Today, 35 states still allow a spouse to allege fault in obtaining a divorce. The traditional fault grounds for divorce are adultery, cruelty, desertion, confinement in prison, physical incapacity and incurable insanity. These grounds are also generally referred to as marital misconduct.