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David L. Freidberg Lawyer

David L. Freidberg

VERIFIED
Criminal, DUI-DWI, Felony, Misdemeanor, White Collar Crime

Attorney David L. Freidberg is highly respected among prosecutors, judges and court personnel for his professionalism and relentless dedication to pro... (more)

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800-613-4870

Andrew Scott Gable Lawyer

Andrew Scott Gable

VERIFIED
Criminal, Felony, White Collar Crime, Misdemeanor, State Appellate Practice
Criminal defense lawyer

Andrew Gable represents people charged with federal and state felonies and misdemeanors. He has handled a wide range of cases from murder and felony ... (more)

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800-950-0841

David L. Freidberg Lawyer

David L. Freidberg

Criminal, DUI-DWI, Felony, Misdemeanor, White Collar Crime

Attorney David L. Freidberg is highly respected among prosecutors, judges and court personnel for his professionalism and relentless dedication to pro... (more)

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312-560-7100

Andrew M. Weisberg Lawyer

Andrew M. Weisberg

VERIFIED
Criminal, Felony, Misdemeanor, White Collar Crime, DUI-DWI
A CHICAGO DEFENSE ATTORNEY WHO KNOWS HOW THE OTHER SIDETHINKS

The Law Office of Andrew M. Weisberg is 100% dedicated to the practice of criminal defense in Chicago, Cook County and the neighboring suburbs. Mr. W... (more)

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800-878-3120

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Clarissa  Myers Lawyer

Clarissa Myers

VERIFIED
Criminal, DUI-DWI, Divorce & Family Law, Misdemeanor, White Collar Crime
DuPage attorney Clarissa R.E. Myers provides aggressivecriminal defense for DUI, aggravated speedin

Ms. Myers is an experienced trial attorney who practices in the area of criminal defense, having completed hundreds of trials and motions in the defen... (more)

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844-984-3529

Michael Francis Mcmahon Lawyer

Michael Francis Mcmahon

Criminal, DUI-DWI, Misdemeanor, White Collar Crime

Criminal Lawyers Serving Oakbrook Terrace, Oak Brook, Elmhurst, and Throughout the Area In the moments after an arrest, it is common to experience ... (more)

Christopher M Cosley Lawyer

Christopher M Cosley

VERIFIED
Criminal, Traffic, DUI-DWI, Misdemeanor, White Collar Crime

Attorney Christopher M. Cosley is a distinguished graduate of Chicago-Kent College of Law. He went on to pass the Illinois State Bar Exam and is an ac... (more)

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847-394-3200

Donald John Ramsell Lawyer

Donald John Ramsell

VERIFIED
Criminal, Traffic, DUI-DWI, White Collar Crime, Felony
When Everyone Else Is On Your Back, We Are On Your Side

Donald J. Ramsell's interests include golf, Corvettes, the Cubs, travel, and winning cases. Donald J. Ramsell is the only Illinois DUI defense att... (more)

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800-767-0380

Eric J Blatti Lawyer

Eric J Blatti

Criminal, Traffic, DUI-DWI, Misdemeanor, White Collar Crime

Attorney Eric J. Blatti was born in the state of Illinois, specifically the Joliet area. He has since remained a part of the local community. Eric gra... (more)

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815-744-2500

Steven P. McCollum Lawyer

Steven P. McCollum

VERIFIED
Criminal, Felony, DUI-DWI, White Collar Crime, Juvenile Law
Waukegan Illinois Criminal Defense Lawyer former Chief Deputy State's Attorney

Welcome to the Law Offices of Steven P. McCollum, P.C., a criminal defense law firm located in Waukegan, Illinois. We hope that this website will prov... (more)

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800-619-4940

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LEGAL TERMS

FALSE IMPRISONMENT

Intentionally restraining another person without having the legal right to do so. It's not necessary that physical force be used; threats or a show of apparent ... (more...)
Intentionally restraining another person without having the legal right to do so. It's not necessary that physical force be used; threats or a show of apparent authority are sufficient. False imprisonment is a misdemeanor and a tort (a civil wrong). If the perpetrator confines the victim for a substantial period of time (or moves him a significant distance) in order to commit a felony, the false imprisonment may become a kidnapping. People who are arrested and get the charges dropped, or are later acquitted, often think that they can sue the arresting officer for false imprisonment (also known as false arrest). These lawsuits rarely succeed: As long as the officer had probable cause to arrest the person, the officer will not be liable for a false arrest, even if it turns out later that the information the officer relied upon was incorrect.

EXCLUSIONARY RULE

A rule of evidence that disallows the use of illegally obtained evidence in criminal trials. For example, the exclusionary rule would prevent a prosecutor from ... (more...)
A rule of evidence that disallows the use of illegally obtained evidence in criminal trials. For example, the exclusionary rule would prevent a prosecutor from introducing at trial evidence seized during an illegal search.

IMPRISON

To put a person in prison or jail or otherwise confine him as punishment for committing a crime.

JURY

Criminal Law Traffic TicketshomeGLOSSARY jury A group of people selected to apply the law, as stated by the judge, to the facts of a case and render a decision,... (more...)
Criminal Law Traffic TicketshomeGLOSSARY jury A group of people selected to apply the law, as stated by the judge, to the facts of a case and render a decision, called the verdict. Traditionally, an American jury was made up of 12 people who had to arrive at a unanimous decision. But today, in many states, juries in civil cases may be composed of as few as six members and non-unanimous verdicts may be permitted. (Most states still require 12-person, unanimous verdicts for criminal trials.) Tracing its history back over 1,000 years, the jury system was brought to England by William the Conqueror in 1066. The philosophy behind the jury system is that--especially in a criminal case--an accused's guilt or innocence should be judged by a group of people from her community ('a jury of her peers'). Recently, some courts have been experimenting with increasing the traditionally rather passive role of the jury by encouraging jurors to take notes and ask questions.

CRIMINAL INSANITY

A mental defect or disease that makes it impossible for a person to understand the wrongfulness of his acts or, even if he understands them, to ditinguish right... (more...)
A mental defect or disease that makes it impossible for a person to understand the wrongfulness of his acts or, even if he understands them, to ditinguish right from wrong. Defendants who are criminally insane cannot be convicted of a crime, since criminal conduct involves the conscious intent to do wrong -- a choice that the criminally insane cannot meaningfully make. See also irresistible impulse; McNaghten Rule.

EAVESDROPPING

Listening to conversations or observing conduct which is meant to be private, typically by using devices that amplify sound or light, such as stethoscopes or bi... (more...)
Listening to conversations or observing conduct which is meant to be private, typically by using devices that amplify sound or light, such as stethoscopes or binoculars. The term comes from the common law offense of listening to private conversations by crouching under the windows or eaves of a house. Nowadays, eavesdropping includes using electronic equipment to intercept telephone or other wire communications, or radio equipment to intercept broadcast communications. Generally, the term 'eavesdropping' is used when the activity is not legally authorized by a search warrant or court order; and the term 'surveillance' is used when the activity is permitted by law. Compare electronic surveillance.

ARREST

A situation in which the police detain a person in a manner that, to any reasonable person, makes it clear she is not free to leave. A person can be 'under arre... (more...)
A situation in which the police detain a person in a manner that, to any reasonable person, makes it clear she is not free to leave. A person can be 'under arrest' even though the police have not announced it; nor are handcuffs or physical restraint necessary. Questioning an arrested person about her involvement in or knowledge of a crime must be preceded by the Miranda warnings if the police intend to use the answers against the person in a criminal case. If the arrested person chooses to remain silent, the questioning must stop.

CAPITAL CASE

A prosecution for murder in which the jury is also asked to decide if the defendant is guilty and, if he is, whether he should be put to death. When a prosecuto... (more...)
A prosecution for murder in which the jury is also asked to decide if the defendant is guilty and, if he is, whether he should be put to death. When a prosecutor brings a capital case (also called a death penalty case), she must charge one or more 'special circumstances' that the jury must find to be true in order to sentence the defendant to death. Each state (and the federal government) has its own list of special circumstances, but common ones include multiple murders, use of a bomb or a finding that the murder was especially heinous, atrocious or cruel.

INFORMATION

The name of the document, sometimes called a criminal complaint or petition in which a prosecutor charges a criminal defendant with a crime, either a felony or ... (more...)
The name of the document, sometimes called a criminal complaint or petition in which a prosecutor charges a criminal defendant with a crime, either a felony or a misdemeanor. The information tells the defendant what crime he is charged with, against whom and when the offense allegedly occurred, but the prosecutor is not obliged to go into great detail. If the defendant wants more specifics, he must ask for it by way of a discovery request. Compare indictment.