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Dallas Divorce Lawyer, Georgia


Includes: Alimony & Spousal Support

Debbie C. Pelerose Lawyer

Debbie C. Pelerose

VERIFIED
Family Law, Divorce, Child Support, Child Custody, Federal Trial Practice

A native Georgian, Debbie Crosby Pelerose was born in 1960 in Macon, Georgia. Debbie moved to the Atlanta area in 1966 and grew up in Smyrna, Georgia,... (more)

Vic Brown Hill Lawyer

Vic Brown Hill

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Child Custody, Child Support, Divorce, Family Law
Aggressive Advocacy in Divorce and Family Law.

Mr. Hill is first and foremost a trial attorney that limits his practice to divorce and other domestic relations cases. Mr. Hill holds a peer review r... (more)

Alexander Gray Hait Lawyer

Alexander Gray Hait

VERIFIED
Divorce, Personal Injury, Bankruptcy, Litigation, Family Law
We are Experienced Family Law, Personal Injury, Bankruptcy, & Divorce Attorneys.

Mr. Alexander Gray Hait (“Alex”) graduated from Georgia Tech in 1989 and went straight into Law School at New England School of Law, Boston, Massa... (more)

Kenneth R. Bernard

Adoption, Alimony & Spousal Support, Corporate, Business Organization
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

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John W. Sherrod

Adoption, Alimony & Spousal Support, Corporate, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

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Robert L. Jones

Divorce, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Joseph William Segraves

Administrative Law, Alimony & Spousal Support, Dispute Resolution, Animal Bite
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

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F Marian Weeks

Adoption, Child Support, Divorce, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

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Ryan Alan Proctor

Adoption, Alimony & Spousal Support, Animal Bite, Child Support
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

COLLUSION

Secret cooperation between two people in order to fool another. Collusion was often practiced by couples before no-fault divorce in order to make up a grounds f... (more...)
Secret cooperation between two people in order to fool another. Collusion was often practiced by couples before no-fault divorce in order to make up a grounds for divorce (such as adultery). By fabricating a permitted reason for divorce, colluding couples hoped to trick a judge into granting their freedom from the marriage. But a spouse accused of wrongdoing who later changed his or her mind about the divorce could expose the collusion to prevent the divorce from going through.

ACKNOWLEDGED FATHER

The biological father of a child born to an unmarried couple who has been established as the father either by his admission or by an agreement between him and t... (more...)
The biological father of a child born to an unmarried couple who has been established as the father either by his admission or by an agreement between him and the child's mother. An acknowledged father must pay child support.

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE

An order from a judge that directs a party to come to court and convince the judge why she shouldn't grant an action proposed by the other side or by the judge ... (more...)
An order from a judge that directs a party to come to court and convince the judge why she shouldn't grant an action proposed by the other side or by the judge on her own (sua sponte). For example, in a divorce, at the request of one parent a judge might issue an order directing the other parent to appear in court on a particular date and time to show cause why the first parent should not be given sole physical custody of the children. Although it would seem that the person receiving an order to show cause is at a procedural disadvantage--she, after all, is the one who is told to come up with a convincing reason why the judge shouldn't order something--both sides normally have an equal chance to convince the judge to rule in their favor.

STIRPES

A term used in wills that refers to descendants of a common ancestor or branch of a family.

SPOUSAL SUPPORT

See alimony.

EMANCIPATION

The act of freeing someone from restraint or bondage. For example, on January 1, 1863, slaves in the confederate states were declared free by an executive order... (more...)
The act of freeing someone from restraint or bondage. For example, on January 1, 1863, slaves in the confederate states were declared free by an executive order of President Lincoln, known as the 'Emancipation Proclamation.' After the Civil War, this emancipation was extended to the entire country and made law by the ratification of the thirteenth amendment to the Constitution. Nowadays, emancipation refers to the point at which a child is free from parental control. It occurs when the child's parents no longer perform their parental duties and surrender their rights to the care, custody and earnings of their minor child. Emancipation may be the result of a voluntary agreement between the parents and child, or it may be implied from their acts and ongoing conduct. For example, a child who leaves her parents' home and becomes entirely self-supporting without their objection is considered emancipated, while a child who goes to stay with a friend or relative and gets a part-time job is not. Emancipation may also occur when a minor child marries or enters the military.

COMMON LAW MARRIAGE

In some states, a type of marriage in which couples can become legally married by living together for a long period of time, representing themselves as a marrie... (more...)
In some states, a type of marriage in which couples can become legally married by living together for a long period of time, representing themselves as a married couple and intending to be married. Contrary to popular belief, the couple must intend to be married and act as though they are for a common law marriage to take effect -- merely living together for a long time won't do it.

ABANDONMENT (OF A CHILD)

A parent's failure to provide any financial assistance to or communicate with his or her child over a period of time. When this happens, a court may deem the ch... (more...)
A parent's failure to provide any financial assistance to or communicate with his or her child over a period of time. When this happens, a court may deem the child abandoned by that parent and order that person's parental rights terminated. Abandonment also describes situations in which a child is physically abandoned -- for example, left on a doorstep, delivered to a hospital or put in a trash can. Physically abandoned children are usually placed in orphanages and made available for adoption.

CONFIDENTIAL COMMUNICATION

Information exchanged between two people who (1) have a relationship in which private communications are protected by law, and (2) intend that the information b... (more...)
Information exchanged between two people who (1) have a relationship in which private communications are protected by law, and (2) intend that the information be kept in confidence. The law recognizes certain parties whose communications will be considered confidential and protected, including spouses, doctor and patient, attorney and client, and priest and confessor. Communications between these individuals cannot be disclosed in court unless the protected party waives that protection. The intention that the communication be confidential is critical. For example, if an attorney and his client are discussing a matter in the presence of an unnecessary third party -- for example, in an elevator with other people present -- the discussion will not be considered confidential and may be admitted at trial. Also known as privileged communication.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Martinez v. Martinez

... During the pendency of divorce proceedings between Amy and Robert Martinez, the trial court granted Mr. Martinez's motion to enforce a settlement agreement pertaining to child custody and visitation and awarded him primary physical custody of the two minor children. ...

Stone v. Stone

... JOHNSON, Presiding Judge. William Stone sued his ex-wife, Sherree, for indemnification under their divorce settlement agreement, breach of fiduciary duty, and fraud. ... William and Sherree separated on August 28, 2005, and William filed for divorce the following month. ...

Darroch v. Willis

... NAHMIAS, Justice. This appeal involves a contempt order arising from a 2007 divorce decree. ... We granted Darroch's application for discretionary appeal. We affirm the trial court's finding that Darroch was willfully in contempt of the divorce decree. ...