Fayetteville Divorce & Family Law Lawyer, Arkansas


J. Douglas Gramling Lawyer

J. Douglas Gramling

VERIFIED
Estate, Divorce & Family Law, Real Estate, Personal Injury, Business

Doug Gramling grew up in Northwest Arkansas. He earned a Bachelor of Science Degree in Business Administration and Economics at Culver Stockton Colleg... (more)

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800-792-6390

Peter (Tripp) G. Estes Lawyer

Peter (Tripp) G. Estes

VERIFIED
Estate, Divorce & Family Law, Personal Injury, Real Estate, Business

"Tripp" Estes is a third-generation attorney who has lived in Fayetteville his entire life. After graduating from The Sam M. Walton College of Busines... (more)

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CONTACT

479-521-4444

Tim  Snively Lawyer

Tim Snively

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Accident & Injury, Real Estate, Lawsuit & Dispute

Tim provides comprehensive legal advice and representation to clients facing a wide variety of legal challenges and opportunities. He has handled all ... (more)

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CONTACT

479-695-2444

Josh  Mostyn Lawyer

Josh Mostyn

VERIFIED
Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Accident & Injury, Estate Planning, Bankruptcy & Debt
Mostyn Prettyman, PLLC, is a general practice law firm providing comprehensive legal services.

Josh Mostyn is a founding Member of Mostyn Prettyman, PLLC. He is a past Benton County Bar Association President. Josh clerked for the Hon. Brad K... (more)

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CONTACT

800-973-3891

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Amy Estes Turner

Business Organization, Products Liability, Family Law, Eminent Domain
Status:  In Good Standing           

Alanna Ellen Martinsky

Family Law, Wills & Probate, Employment, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           

Raymond Carroll Smith

Veterans' Affairs, Wills & Probate, Estate, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  42 Years

Robert Ray Estes

Criminal, Family Law, Commercial Real Estate, Personal Injury, Credit & Debt
Status:  In Good Standing           

Paul Younger

Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Real Estate, Business
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  8 Years

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Leslie Copeland

Family Law, Divorce, Custody & Visitation, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

IRRECONCILABLE DIFFERENCES

Differences between spouses that are considered sufficiently severe to make married life together more or less impossible. In a number of states, irreconcilable... (more...)
Differences between spouses that are considered sufficiently severe to make married life together more or less impossible. In a number of states, irreconcilable differences is the accepted ground for a no-fault divorce. As a practical matter, courts seldom, if ever, inquire into what the differences actually are, and routinely grant a divorce as long as the party seeking the divorce says the couple has irreconcilable differences. Compare incompatibility; irremediable breakdown.

SEPARATE PROPERTY

In community property states, property owned and controlled entirely by one spouse in a marriage. At divorce, separate property is not divided under the state's... (more...)
In community property states, property owned and controlled entirely by one spouse in a marriage. At divorce, separate property is not divided under the state's property division laws, but is kept by the spouse who owns it. Separate property includes all property that a spouse obtained before marriage, through inheritance or as a gift. It also includes any property that is traceable to separate property -- for example, cash from the sale of a vintage car owned by one spouse before marriage-and any property that the spouses agree is separate property. Compare community property and equitable distribution.

WRONGFUL DEATH RECOVERIES

After a wrongful death lawsuit, the portion of a judgment intended to compensate a plaintiff for having to live without a deceased person. The compensation is i... (more...)
After a wrongful death lawsuit, the portion of a judgment intended to compensate a plaintiff for having to live without a deceased person. The compensation is intended to cover the earnings and the emotional comfort and support the deceased person would have provided.

COLLUSION

Secret cooperation between two people in order to fool another. Collusion was often practiced by couples before no-fault divorce in order to make up a grounds f... (more...)
Secret cooperation between two people in order to fool another. Collusion was often practiced by couples before no-fault divorce in order to make up a grounds for divorce (such as adultery). By fabricating a permitted reason for divorce, colluding couples hoped to trick a judge into granting their freedom from the marriage. But a spouse accused of wrongdoing who later changed his or her mind about the divorce could expose the collusion to prevent the divorce from going through.

NEXT OF KIN

The closest relatives, as defined by state law, of a deceased person. Most states recognize the spouse and the nearest blood relatives as next of kin.

GUARDIAN AD LITEM

A person, not necessarily a lawyer, who is appointed by a court to represent and protect the interests of a child or an incapacitated adult during a lawsuit. Fo... (more...)
A person, not necessarily a lawyer, who is appointed by a court to represent and protect the interests of a child or an incapacitated adult during a lawsuit. For example, a guardian ad litem (GAL) may be appointed to represent the interests of a child whose parents are locked in a contentious battle for custody, or to protect a child's interests in a lawsuit where there are allegations of child abuse. The GAL may conduct interviews and investigations, make reports to the court and participate in court hearings or mediation sessions. Sometimes called court-appointed special advocates (CASAs).

MARRIAGE CERTIFICATE

A document that provides proof of a marriage, typically issued to the newlyweds a few weeks after they file for the certificate in a county office. Most states ... (more...)
A document that provides proof of a marriage, typically issued to the newlyweds a few weeks after they file for the certificate in a county office. Most states require both spouses, the person who officiated the marriage and one or two witnesses to sign the marriage certificate; often this is done just after the ceremony.

SURVIVORS BENEFITS

An amount of money available to the surviving spouse and minor or disabled children of a deceased worker who qualified for Social Security retirement or disabil... (more...)
An amount of money available to the surviving spouse and minor or disabled children of a deceased worker who qualified for Social Security retirement or disability benefits.

INTERLOCUTORY DECREE

A court judgment that is not final until the judge decides other matters in the case or until enough time has passed to see if the interim decision is working. ... (more...)
A court judgment that is not final until the judge decides other matters in the case or until enough time has passed to see if the interim decision is working. In the past, interlocutory decrees were most often used in divorces. The terms of the divorce were set out in an interlocutory decree, which would become final only after a waiting period. The purpose of the waiting period was to allow the couple time to reconcile. They rarely did, however, so most states no longer use interlocutory decrees of divorce.

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