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Indianapolis Divorce Lawyer, Indiana


Includes: Alimony & Spousal Support

Vanessa  Lopez Aguilera Lawyer

Vanessa Lopez Aguilera

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Child Support, Divorce, Guardianships & Conservatorships, Adoption

Many of Vanessa Lopez Aguilera's clients come to her when their world's are falling apart. The majority of her law practice consists of family law iss... (more)

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800-606-8160

Christopher M. Eskew Lawyer

Christopher M. Eskew

VERIFIED
Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Felony, Bankruptcy & Debt, Divorce
Criminal Defense Attorney with Eskew Law LLC

Chris Eskew is a litigator and trial attorney with years of experience counseling clients in a wide spectrum of legal practice areas. The legal profe... (more)

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CONTACT

800-950-8280

Tracy  Enochs Reeves Lawyer

Tracy Enochs Reeves

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Child Custody, Divorce, Child Support, Mediation

Tracy has focused her practice in the areas of mediation and family law issues for nearly 20 years. She received her Bachelor of Science Degree in Le... (more)

Angela D. Adams

Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support, Adoption, Asylum
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Jennifer L. Thornburg

Family Law, Child Support, Divorce, Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Kathryn Hillebrands Burroughs

Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support, Adoption, Children's Rights
Status:  In Good Standing           

Andrew R. Bloch

Farms, Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support, Children's Rights
Status:  In Good Standing           

Monty K. Woolsey

Collaborative Law, Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support, Adoption
Status:  In Good Standing           

Thomas McKinney Green

Adoption, Child Support, Farms, Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Easily find Indianapolis Divorce Lawyers and Indianapolis Divorce Law Firms. For more attorneys, search all Divorce & Family Law areas including Adoption, Child Custody, Child Support and Family Law attorneys.

LEGAL TERMS

ADOPT

(1) To assume the legal relationship of parent to another person's child. See also adoption. (2) To approve or accept something -- for example, a legislative bo... (more...)
(1) To assume the legal relationship of parent to another person's child. See also adoption. (2) To approve or accept something -- for example, a legislative body may adopt a law or an amendment, a government agency may adopt a regulation or a party to a lawsuit may adopt a particular argument.

DIVORCE

The legal termination of marriage. All states require a spouse to identify a legal reason for requesting a divorce when that spouse files the divorce papers wit... (more...)
The legal termination of marriage. All states require a spouse to identify a legal reason for requesting a divorce when that spouse files the divorce papers with the court. These reasons are referred to as grounds for a divorce.

RESTRAINING ORDER

An order from a court directing one person not to do something, such as make contact with another person, enter the family home or remove a child from the state... (more...)
An order from a court directing one person not to do something, such as make contact with another person, enter the family home or remove a child from the state. Restraining orders are typically issued in cases in which spousal abuse or stalking is feared -- or has occurred -- in an attempt to ensure the victim's safety. Restraining orders are also commonly issued to cool down ugly disputes between neighbors.

AGE OF MAJORITY

Adulthood in the eyes of the law. After reaching the age of majority, a person is permitted to vote, make a valid will, enter into binding contracts, enlist in ... (more...)
Adulthood in the eyes of the law. After reaching the age of majority, a person is permitted to vote, make a valid will, enter into binding contracts, enlist in the armed forces and purchase alcohol. Also, parents may stop making child support payments when a child reaches the age of majority. In most states the age of majority is 18, but this varies depending on the activity. For example, in some states people are allowed to vote when they reach the age of eighteen, but can't purchase alcohol until they're 21.

MISUNDERSTANDING

A mistake by both spouses in a marriage that can serve as grounds for an annulment. For example, if one spouse went into the marriage wanting children while the... (more...)
A mistake by both spouses in a marriage that can serve as grounds for an annulment. For example, if one spouse went into the marriage wanting children while the other did not, they have a misunderstanding that will be judged serious enough for a court to terminate the marriage.

HEARING

In the trial court context, a legal proceeding (other than a full-scale trial) held before a judge. During a hearing, evidence and arguments are presented in an... (more...)
In the trial court context, a legal proceeding (other than a full-scale trial) held before a judge. During a hearing, evidence and arguments are presented in an effort to resolve a disputed factual or legal issue. Hearings typically, but by no means always, occur prior to trial when a party asks the judge to decide a specific issue--often on an interim basis--such as whether a temporary restraining order or preliminary injunction should be issued, or temporary child custody or child support awarded. In the administrative or agency law context, a hearing is usually a proceeding before an administrative hearing officer or judge representing an agency that has the power to regulate a particular field or oversee a governmental benefit program. For example, the Federal Aviation Board (FAB) has the authority to hold hearings on airline safety, and a state Worker's Compensation Appeals Board has the power to rule on the appeals of people whose applications for benefits have been denied.

DESERTION

The voluntary abandonment of one spouse by the other, without the abandoned spouse's consent. Commonly, desertion occurs when a spouse leaves the marital home f... (more...)
The voluntary abandonment of one spouse by the other, without the abandoned spouse's consent. Commonly, desertion occurs when a spouse leaves the marital home for a specified length of time. Desertion is a grounds for divorce in states with fault divorce.

NO-FAULT DIVORCE

Any divorce in which the spouse who wants to split up does not have to accuse the other of wrongdoing, but can simply state that the couple no longer gets along... (more...)
Any divorce in which the spouse who wants to split up does not have to accuse the other of wrongdoing, but can simply state that the couple no longer gets along. Until no-fault divorce arrived in the 1970s, the only way a person could get a divorce was to prove that the other spouse was at fault for the marriage not working. No-fault divorces are usually granted for reasons such as incompatibility, irreconcilable differences, or irretrievable or irremediable breakdown of the marriage. Also, some states allow incurable insanity as a basis for a no-fault divorce. Compare fault divorce.

BRIEF

A document used to submit a legal contention or argument to a court. A brief typically sets out the facts of the case and a party's argument as to why she shoul... (more...)
A document used to submit a legal contention or argument to a court. A brief typically sets out the facts of the case and a party's argument as to why she should prevail. These arguments must be supported by legal authority and precedent, such as statutes, regulations and previous court decisions. Although it is usually possible to submit a brief to a trial court (called a trial brief), briefs are most commonly used as a central part of the appeal process (an appellate brief). But don't be fooled by the name -- briefs are usually anything but brief, as pointed out by writer Franz Kafka, who defined a lawyer as 'a person who writes a 10,000 word decision and calls it a brief.'

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

MS v. CS

... denied, and Schueneman v. Schueneman, 591 NE2d 603, 611 (Ind.Ct.App.1992), for the general proposition that parties to a divorce are free to agree to the custody and support of their children, and such an agreement is binding on the parties once it becomes part of a court ...

Johnson v. Johnson

... In April 2008, when Robert sought to renew his line of credit for the first time since the divorce, First Source required him to obtain an agreement from Gina ensuring her interests in the farm would not subordinate its own. [4] (App. ...

Tew v. Tew

... The trial court subsequently entered a divorce decree dissolving their marriage on June 17, 2003. Pursuant to the divorce decree, Mother was awarded custody of MT, and Father was awarded parenting time and ordered to pay child support. ...