Memphis Felony Lawyer, Tennessee


Reginald E Shelton Lawyer

Reginald E Shelton

VERIFIED
Family Law, Personal Injury, Child Custody, Criminal, Lawsuit
Knowledgeable, Accessible, Friendly, and moderately priced. Please review my website and Facebook ad

By way of introduction, I am Attorney Reginald E. Shelton and I have over seven (7) years of legal experience representing clients in General Sessions... (more)

James Mcmurtry Gulley Lawyer

James Mcmurtry Gulley

VERIFIED
Criminal
Over 23 Years Experience And Over 100 Jury Trials

James Gulley is a Criminal Defense lawyer proudly serving Memphis, Tennessee and the neighboring communities.

Billy  Gilchrist Lawyer

Billy Gilchrist

VERIFIED
Misdemeanor, Felony, DUI-DWI, White Collar Crime, Traffic

I practice in Memphis, Bartlett, Collierville and Germantown courts. I will personally handle your case. I handle all types of criminal cases includin... (more)

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800-328-6230

Richard Dennis Underwood Lawyer

Richard Dennis Underwood

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Criminal, Corporate, Estate

Mr. Underwood’s litigation practice concentrates in the areas of general civil litigation, commercial, employment, and personal injury litigation. ... (more)

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Stephen Rutland Leffler

Bad Faith Insurance, Criminal, DUI-DWI, Felony
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Mark S. McDaniel

Criminal, Traffic, Accident & Injury, Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Chesney Falk McAfee

Criminal, Federal Appellate Practice, Federal Trial Practice, State Trial Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           

Bobby F. Martin

Criminal, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

James W. Curry

Animal Bite, DUI-DWI, Premises Liability, Car Accident
Status:  In Good Standing           

Marty B. McAfee

White Collar Crime, DUI-DWI, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

FEDERAL COURT

A branch of the United States government with power derived directly from the U.S. Constitution. Federal courts decide cases involving the U.S. Constitution, fe... (more...)
A branch of the United States government with power derived directly from the U.S. Constitution. Federal courts decide cases involving the U.S. Constitution, federal law--for example, patents, federal taxes, labor law and federal crimes, such as robbing a federally chartered bank--and cases where the parties are from different states and are involved in a dispute for $75,000 or more.

DECLARATION UNDER PENALTY OF PERJURY

A signed statement, sworn to be true by the signer, that will make the signer guilty of the crime of perjury if the statement is shown to be materially false --... (more...)
A signed statement, sworn to be true by the signer, that will make the signer guilty of the crime of perjury if the statement is shown to be materially false -- that is, the lie is relevant and significant to the case.

LARCENY

Another term for theft. Although the definition of this term differs from state to state, it typically means taking property belonging to another with the inten... (more...)
Another term for theft. Although the definition of this term differs from state to state, it typically means taking property belonging to another with the intent to permanently deprive the owner of the property. If the taking is non forceful, it is larceny; if it is accompanied by force or fear directed against a person, it is robbery, a much more serious offense.

HABEAS CORPUS

Latin for 'You have the body.' A prisoner files a petition for writ of habeas corpus in order to challenge the authority of the prison or jail warden to continu... (more...)
Latin for 'You have the body.' A prisoner files a petition for writ of habeas corpus in order to challenge the authority of the prison or jail warden to continue to hold him. If the judge orders a hearing after reading the writ, the prisoner gets to argue that his confinement is illegal. These writs are frequently filed by convicted prisoners who challenge their conviction on the grounds that the trial attorney failed to prepare the defense and was incompetent. Prisoners sentenced to death also file habeas petitions challenging the constitutionality of the state death penalty law. Habeas writs are different from and do not replace appeals, which are arguments for reversal of a conviction based on claims that the judge conducted the trial improperly. Often, convicted prisoners file both.

ACQUITTAL

A decision by a judge or jury that a defendant in a criminal case is not guilty of a crime. An acquittal is not a finding of innocence; it is simply a conclusio... (more...)
A decision by a judge or jury that a defendant in a criminal case is not guilty of a crime. An acquittal is not a finding of innocence; it is simply a conclusion that the prosecution has not proved its case beyond a reasonable doubt.

SEARCH WARRANT

An order signed by a judge that directs owners of private property to allow the police to enter and search for items named in the warrant. The judge won't issue... (more...)
An order signed by a judge that directs owners of private property to allow the police to enter and search for items named in the warrant. The judge won't issue the warrant unless she has been convinced that there is probable cause for the search -- that reliable evidence shows that it's more likely than not that a crime has occurred and that the items sought by the police are connected with it and will be found at the location named in the warrant. In limited situations the police may search without a warrant, but they cannot use what they find at trial if the defense can show that there was no probable cause for the search.

BAIL

The money paid to the court, usually at arraignment or shortly thereafter, to ensure that an arrested person who is released from jail will show up at all requi... (more...)
The money paid to the court, usually at arraignment or shortly thereafter, to ensure that an arrested person who is released from jail will show up at all required court appearances. The amount of bail is determined by the local bail schedule, which is based on the seriousness of the offense. The judge can increase the bail if the prosecutor convinces him that the defendant is likely to flee (for example, if he has failed to show up in court in the past), or he can decrease it if the defense attorney shows that the defendant is unlikely to run (for example, he has strong ties to the community by way of a steady job and a family).

IRRESISTIBLE IMPULSE TEST

A seldom-used test for criminal insanity that labels the person insane if he could not control his actions when committing the crime, even though he knew his ac... (more...)
A seldom-used test for criminal insanity that labels the person insane if he could not control his actions when committing the crime, even though he knew his actions were wrong.

NOLLE PROSEQUI

Latin for 'we shall no longer prosecute.' At trial, this is an entry made on the record by a prosecutor in a criminal case stating that he will no longer pursue... (more...)
Latin for 'we shall no longer prosecute.' At trial, this is an entry made on the record by a prosecutor in a criminal case stating that he will no longer pursue the matter. An entry of nolle prosequi may be made at any time after charges are brought and before a verdict is returned or a plea entered. Essentially, it is an admission on the part of the prosecution that some aspect of its case against the defendant has fallen apart. Most of the time, prosecutors need a judge's A1:C576 to 'nol-pros' a case. (See Federal Rule of Criminal Procedure 48a.) Abbreviated 'nol. pros.' or 'nol-pros.'