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Memphis White Collar Crime Lawyer, Tennessee


Reginald E Shelton Lawyer

Reginald E Shelton

VERIFIED
Family Law, Personal Injury, Child Custody, Criminal, Lawsuit
Knowledgeable, Accessible, Friendly, and moderately priced. Please review my website and Facebook ad

By way of introduction, I am Attorney Reginald E. Shelton and I have over seven (7) years of legal experience representing clients in General Sessions... (more)

Billy  Gilchrist Lawyer

Billy Gilchrist

VERIFIED
Misdemeanor, Felony, DUI-DWI, White Collar Crime, Traffic

I practice in Memphis, Bartlett, Collierville and Germantown courts. I will personally handle your case. I handle all types of criminal cases includin... (more)

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800-328-6230

Stephen Rutland Leffler

Bad Faith Insurance, Criminal, DUI-DWI, Felony, Premises Liability
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

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Mark S. McDaniel

Family Law, Workers' Compensation, Traffic, Divorce, White Collar Crime
Status:  In Good Standing           

Chesney Falk McAfee

Criminal, Federal Appellate Practice, Federal Trial Practice, State Trial Practice, US Supreme Court
Status:  In Good Standing           

Bobby F. Martin

Criminal, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

James W. Curry

Animal Bite, DUI-DWI, Premises Liability, Car Accident, Wrongful Death
Status:  In Good Standing           

Marty B. McAfee

White Collar Crime, DUI-DWI, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Samuel J. Muldavin

Dispute Resolution, Criminal, DUI-DWI, Car Accident, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

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Patrick E. Stegall

Criminal, DUI-DWI, Immigration, Traffic, White Collar Crime
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

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LEGAL TERMS

CONVICTION

A finding by a judge or jury that the defendant is guilty of a crime.

DISTRICT ATTORNEY (D.A.)

A lawyer who is elected to represent a state government in criminal cases in a designated county or judicial district. A D.A.'s duties typically include reviewi... (more...)
A lawyer who is elected to represent a state government in criminal cases in a designated county or judicial district. A D.A.'s duties typically include reviewing police arrest reports, deciding whether to bring criminal charges against arrested people and prosecuting criminal cases in court. The D.A. may also supervise other attorneys, called Deputy District Attorneys or Assistant District Attorneys. In some states a District Attorney may be called a Prosecuting Attorney, County Attorney or State's Attorney. In the federal system, the equivalent to the D.A. is a United States Attorney. The country has many U.S. Attorneys, each appointed by the President, who supervise regional offices staffed with prosecutors called Assistant United States Attorneys.

MCNAGHTEN RULE

The earliest and most common test for criminal insanity, in which a criminal defendant is judged legally insane only if he could not distinguish right from wron... (more...)
The earliest and most common test for criminal insanity, in which a criminal defendant is judged legally insane only if he could not distinguish right from wrong at the time he committed the crime. For example, a delusional psychotic who believed that his assaultive acts were in response to the will of God would not be criminally responsible for his acts.

MISTRIAL

A trial that ends prematurely and without a judgment, due either to a mistake that jeopardizes a party's right to a fair trial or to a jury that can't agree on ... (more...)
A trial that ends prematurely and without a judgment, due either to a mistake that jeopardizes a party's right to a fair trial or to a jury that can't agree on a verdict (a hung jury) If a judge declares a mistrial in a civil case, he or she will direct that the case be set for a new trial at a future date. Mistrials in criminal cases can result in a retrial, a plea bargain or a dismissal of the charges.

JURY NULLIFICATION

A decision by the jury to acquit a defendant who has violated a law that the jury believes is unjust or wrong. Jury nullification has always been an option for ... (more...)
A decision by the jury to acquit a defendant who has violated a law that the jury believes is unjust or wrong. Jury nullification has always been an option for juries in England and the United States, although judges will prevent a defense lawyer from urging the jury to acquit on this basis. Nullification was evident during the Vietnam war (when selective service protesters were acquitted by juries opposed to the war) and currently appears in criminal cases when the jury disagrees with the punishment--for example, in 'three strikes' cases when the jury realizes that conviction of a relatively minor offense will result in lifetime imprisonment.

INFORMED CONSENT

An agreement to do something or to allow something to happen, made with complete knowledge of all relevant facts, such as the risks involved or any available al... (more...)
An agreement to do something or to allow something to happen, made with complete knowledge of all relevant facts, such as the risks involved or any available alternatives. For example, a patient may give informed consent to medical treatment only after the healthcare professional has disclosed all possible risks involved in accepting or rejecting the treatment. A healthcare provider or facility may be held responsible for an injury caused by an undisclosed risk. In another context, a person accused of committing a crime cannot give up his constitutional rights--for example, to remain silent or to talk with an attorney--unless and until he has been informed of those rights, usually via the well-known Miranda warnings.

PROBABLE CAUSE

The amount and quality of information police must have before they can arrest or search without a warrant or that a judge must have before she will sign a searc... (more...)
The amount and quality of information police must have before they can arrest or search without a warrant or that a judge must have before she will sign a search warrant allowing the police to conduct a search or arrest a suspect. Reliable information must show that it's more likely than not that a crime has occurred and the suspect is involved.

FELONY

A serious crime (contrasted with misdemeanors and infractions, less serious crimes), usually punishable by a prison term of more than one year or, in some cases... (more...)
A serious crime (contrasted with misdemeanors and infractions, less serious crimes), usually punishable by a prison term of more than one year or, in some cases, by death. For example, murder, extortion and kidnapping are felonies; a minor fist fight is usually charged as a misdemeanor, and a speeding ticket is generally an infraction.

MOTION IN LIMINE

A request submitted to the court before trial in an attempt to exclude evidence from the proceedings. A motion in limine is usually made by a party when simply ... (more...)
A request submitted to the court before trial in an attempt to exclude evidence from the proceedings. A motion in limine is usually made by a party when simply the mention of the evidence would prejudice the jury against that party, even if the judge later instructed the jury to disregard the evidence. For example, if a defendant in a criminal trial were questioned and confessed to the crime without having been read his Miranda rights, his lawyer would file a motion in limine to keep evidence of the confession out of the trial.
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