Plano Family Law Lawyer, Texas

Featured Law Firm


Includes: Collaborative Law, Domestic Violence & Neglect, Paternity, Prenuptial Agreements

Mary Ellen Neal Lawyer

Mary Ellen Neal

Family Law, State Appellate Practice, Wills
Darlina  Crowder Lawyer

Darlina Crowder

Criminal, Domestic Violence & Neglect, Felony, DUI-DWI, Misdemeanor

Attorney Darlina C. Crowder provides criminal defense representation for clients in the Plano, Texas area. She has been practicing law in the U.S. Dis... (more)

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CONTACT

214-303-9600

D. Robert  Jones Lawyer

D. Robert Jones

VERIFIED
Immigration, Criminal, Family Law, Medical Malpractice, Bankruptcy

Full-service law firm, dedicated to serving Texas and Nationwide, Practicing in wide areas of Law, kindly see our services.

Mark Rush Williamson Lawyer

Mark Rush Williamson

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Child Support, Paternity, Child Custody, Divorce
Award Winning Dallas Divorce Attorney

We understand that you have a lot of choices when it comes to finding an attorney to represent you in your family law dispute. The attorneys at Willia... (more)

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Charles H. Robertson Lawyer

Charles H. Robertson

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Divorce, Family Law, Child Custody, Child Support

Charles Robertson earned his law degree from Southern Methodist University, is Board Certified in Family Law by the Texas Board of Legal Specializat... (more)

Jeffrey Owen Anderson Lawyer

Jeffrey Owen Anderson

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Family Law, Divorce, Child Custody, Child Support

Professional, yet approachable. Confident, yet easygoing. I will tenaciously represent you with honesty, integrity and empathy. I come from a family o... (more)

Carin Paris Evans Lawyer

Carin Paris Evans

International Other, Family Law

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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LEGAL TERMS

CLOSE CORPORATION

A corporation owned and operated by a few individuals, often members of the same family, rather than by public shareholders. State laws permit close corporation... (more...)
A corporation owned and operated by a few individuals, often members of the same family, rather than by public shareholders. State laws permit close corporations to function more informally than regular corporations. For example, shareholders can make decisions without holding meetings of the board of directors, and can fill vacancies on the board without a vote of the shareholders.

PHYSICAL INCAPACITY

The inability of a spouse to engage in sexual intercourse with the other spouse. In some states, physical incapacity is a ground for an annulment or fault divor... (more...)
The inability of a spouse to engage in sexual intercourse with the other spouse. In some states, physical incapacity is a ground for an annulment or fault divorce, assuming the incapacity was not disclosed to the other spouse before the marriage.

NEXT OF KIN

The closest relatives, as defined by state law, of a deceased person. Most states recognize the spouse and the nearest blood relatives as next of kin.

NEXT FRIEND

A person, usually a relative, who appears in court on behalf of a minor or incompetent plaintiff, but who is not a party to the lawsuit. For example, children a... (more...)
A person, usually a relative, who appears in court on behalf of a minor or incompetent plaintiff, but who is not a party to the lawsuit. For example, children are often represented in court by their parents as 'next friends.'

MISUNDERSTANDING

A mistake by both spouses in a marriage that can serve as grounds for an annulment. For example, if one spouse went into the marriage wanting children while the... (more...)
A mistake by both spouses in a marriage that can serve as grounds for an annulment. For example, if one spouse went into the marriage wanting children while the other did not, they have a misunderstanding that will be judged serious enough for a court to terminate the marriage.

VISITATION RIGHTS

The right to see a child regularly, typically awarded by the court to the parent who does not have physical custody of the child. The court will deny visitation... (more...)
The right to see a child regularly, typically awarded by the court to the parent who does not have physical custody of the child. The court will deny visitation rights only if it decides that visitation would hurt the child so much that the parent should be kept away.

STIRPES

A term used in wills that refers to descendants of a common ancestor or branch of a family.

NO-FAULT DIVORCE

Any divorce in which the spouse who wants to split up does not have to accuse the other of wrongdoing, but can simply state that the couple no longer gets along... (more...)
Any divorce in which the spouse who wants to split up does not have to accuse the other of wrongdoing, but can simply state that the couple no longer gets along. Until no-fault divorce arrived in the 1970s, the only way a person could get a divorce was to prove that the other spouse was at fault for the marriage not working. No-fault divorces are usually granted for reasons such as incompatibility, irreconcilable differences, or irretrievable or irremediable breakdown of the marriage. Also, some states allow incurable insanity as a basis for a no-fault divorce. Compare fault divorce.

INTERLOCUTORY DECREE

A court judgment that is not final until the judge decides other matters in the case or until enough time has passed to see if the interim decision is working. ... (more...)
A court judgment that is not final until the judge decides other matters in the case or until enough time has passed to see if the interim decision is working. In the past, interlocutory decrees were most often used in divorces. The terms of the divorce were set out in an interlocutory decree, which would become final only after a waiting period. The purpose of the waiting period was to allow the couple time to reconcile. They rarely did, however, so most states no longer use interlocutory decrees of divorce.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

In re ABP

... STANDARD OF REVIEW. Most appealable issues in a family law case, including the issues in this case, are evaluated under an abuse-of-discretion standard. ... I have practiced in the community, in this community for approximately 15 years in the area of family law. ...

IN RE DEPT. OF FAMILY & PROTECTIVE SERVICES

... We review a trial court's interpretation of the law de novo. State v. Shumake, 199 SW3d 279, 284 (Tex.2006). A trial court has no discretion in determining what the law is or properly applying the law. In re Tex. Dep't of Family & Protective Servs., 210 SW3d 609, 612 (Tex.2006). ...

Lumpkin v. DEPARTMENT OF FAMILY PROT. SERV.

... 263.405(i); see Pool v. Texas Dep't of Family & Protective ... that, if a trial court determines that an appeal is frivolous, the court has necessarily determined that each of the issues identified in the statement of points is frivolous; that is, that they lack a substantial basis in law or fact ...