Waco Family Law Lawyer, Texas


Includes: Collaborative Law, Domestic Violence & Neglect, Paternity, Prenuptial Agreements

Russell D. Hunt Lawyer

Russell D. Hunt

VERIFIED
DUI-DWI, Federal Appellate Practice, Domestic Violence & Neglect, International,

Russell Hunt is a practicing lawyer in the state of Texas.

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-824-5271

Chris L. Cornish

Family Law, Litigation, State Trial Practice, State and Local
Status:  In Good Standing           

Kelli Fernandez Villarrial

Wills & Probate, Family Law, Criminal, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

Raymond E. Rushing

Administrative Law, Dispute Resolution, Collaborative Law, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Nancy Elizabeth Harrison

Family Law, Divorce & Family Law, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  14 Years

Nora Mary Farah

Dispute Resolution, Family Law, , Juvenile Law, Car Accident
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  15 Years

Gary William Cunha

Bankruptcy, Personal Injury, Family Law, Criminal, Mass Torts
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  26 Years

Laura Beth Krasienko

DUI-DWI, Estate Planning, Car Accident, Family Law, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  21 Years

James Robert Angel

Family Law, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  28 Years

Rachel Alysia Dove

Family Law, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  10 Years

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

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Easily find Waco Family Law Lawyers and Waco Family Law Firms. For more attorneys, search all Divorce & Family Law areas including Adoption, Child Custody, Child Support and Divorce attorneys.

LEGAL TERMS

CUSTODY (OF A CHILD)

The legal authority to make decisions affecting a child's interests (legal custody) and the responsibility of taking care of the child (physical custody). When ... (more...)
The legal authority to make decisions affecting a child's interests (legal custody) and the responsibility of taking care of the child (physical custody). When parents separate or divorce, one of the hardest decisions they have to make is which parent will have custody. The most common arrangement is for one parent to have custody (both physical and legal) while the other parent has a right of visitation. But it is not uncommon for the parents to share legal custody, even though one parent has physical custody. The most uncommon arrangement is for the parents to share both legal and physical custody.

ADOPTION

A court procedure by which an adult becomes the legal parent of someone who is not his or her biological child. Adoption creates a parent-child relationship rec... (more...)
A court procedure by which an adult becomes the legal parent of someone who is not his or her biological child. Adoption creates a parent-child relationship recognized for all legal purposes -- including child support obligations, inheritance rights and custody.

EMANCIPATION

The act of freeing someone from restraint or bondage. For example, on January 1, 1863, slaves in the confederate states were declared free by an executive order... (more...)
The act of freeing someone from restraint or bondage. For example, on January 1, 1863, slaves in the confederate states were declared free by an executive order of President Lincoln, known as the 'Emancipation Proclamation.' After the Civil War, this emancipation was extended to the entire country and made law by the ratification of the thirteenth amendment to the Constitution. Nowadays, emancipation refers to the point at which a child is free from parental control. It occurs when the child's parents no longer perform their parental duties and surrender their rights to the care, custody and earnings of their minor child. Emancipation may be the result of a voluntary agreement between the parents and child, or it may be implied from their acts and ongoing conduct. For example, a child who leaves her parents' home and becomes entirely self-supporting without their objection is considered emancipated, while a child who goes to stay with a friend or relative and gets a part-time job is not. Emancipation may also occur when a minor child marries or enters the military.

HEAD OF HOUSEHOLD

A person who supports and maintains, in one household, one or more people who are closely related to him by blood, marriage or adoption. Under federal income ta... (more...)
A person who supports and maintains, in one household, one or more people who are closely related to him by blood, marriage or adoption. Under federal income tax law, you are eligible for favorable tax treatment as the head of household only if you are unmarried and you manage a household which is the principal residence (for more than half of the year) of dependent children or other dependent relatives. Under bankruptcy homestead and exemption laws, the terms householder and 'head of household' mean the same thing. Examples include a single woman supporting her disabled sister and her own children or a bachelor supporting his parents. Many states consider a single person supporting only himself to be a head of household as well.

IRRECONCILABLE DIFFERENCES

Differences between spouses that are considered sufficiently severe to make married life together more or less impossible. In a number of states, irreconcilable... (more...)
Differences between spouses that are considered sufficiently severe to make married life together more or less impossible. In a number of states, irreconcilable differences is the accepted ground for a no-fault divorce. As a practical matter, courts seldom, if ever, inquire into what the differences actually are, and routinely grant a divorce as long as the party seeking the divorce says the couple has irreconcilable differences. Compare incompatibility; irremediable breakdown.

PROVOCATION

The act of inciting another person to do a particular thing. In a fault divorce, provocation may constitute a defense to the divorce, preventing it from going t... (more...)
The act of inciting another person to do a particular thing. In a fault divorce, provocation may constitute a defense to the divorce, preventing it from going through. For example, if a wife suing for divorce claims that her husband abandoned her, the husband might defend the suit on the grounds that she provoked the abandonment by driving him out of the house.

PHYSICAL CUSTODY

The right and obligation of a parent to have his child live with him. Compare legal custody.

BRIEF

A document used to submit a legal contention or argument to a court. A brief typically sets out the facts of the case and a party's argument as to why she shoul... (more...)
A document used to submit a legal contention or argument to a court. A brief typically sets out the facts of the case and a party's argument as to why she should prevail. These arguments must be supported by legal authority and precedent, such as statutes, regulations and previous court decisions. Although it is usually possible to submit a brief to a trial court (called a trial brief), briefs are most commonly used as a central part of the appeal process (an appellate brief). But don't be fooled by the name -- briefs are usually anything but brief, as pointed out by writer Franz Kafka, who defined a lawyer as 'a person who writes a 10,000 word decision and calls it a brief.'

SHARED CUSTODY

See joint custody.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

In re ABP

... STANDARD OF REVIEW. Most appealable issues in a family law case, including the issues in this case, are evaluated under an abuse-of-discretion standard. ... I have practiced in the community, in this community for approximately 15 years in the area of family law. ...

IN RE DEPT. OF FAMILY & PROTECTIVE SERVICES

... We review a trial court's interpretation of the law de novo. State v. Shumake, 199 SW3d 279, 284 (Tex.2006). A trial court has no discretion in determining what the law is or properly applying the law. In re Tex. Dep't of Family & Protective Servs., 210 SW3d 609, 612 (Tex.2006). ...

Lumpkin v. DEPARTMENT OF FAMILY PROT. SERV.

... 263.405(i); see Pool v. Texas Dep't of Family & Protective ... that, if a trial court determines that an appeal is frivolous, the court has necessarily determined that each of the issues identified in the statement of points is frivolous; that is, that they lack a substantial basis in law or fact ...