Polk Estate Lawyer, Missouri


BJ  Richardson Lawyer

BJ Richardson

Divorce & Family Law, Family Law, Bankruptcy & Debt, Bankruptcy, Estate

Our attorneys in Springfield, MO have over 75 years of combined experience and have helped thousands of clients with their estate planning, bankruptcy... (more)

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CONTACT

417-234-1874

Ronald K. Carpenter

Estate Planning, Corporate, Business Organization, Banking & Finance
Status:  In Good Standing           

Karsten E. Bredesen

Family Law, Wills, Traffic, Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           

Donald Matthew Brown

Corporate, Bankruptcy, Car Accident, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Verna Lee Haun

Juvenile Law, Estate, Adoption, Elder Law, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Kerry Patrick Douglas

Estate, Real Estate, Corporate, Business Organization
Status:  In Good Standing           

Peter Allen Lee

International Tax, Estate Planning, Adoption, Medical Malpractice
Status:  In Good Standing           

Meagan Marie Howe

Dispute Resolution, International Tax, Estate Planning, Family Law, Traffic
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  10 Years

Marsha Irene Stiles

Civil & Human Rights, Criminal, Wills & Probate, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  18 Years

Beverly Jean Alkire

Power of Attorney, Estate Planning, Family Law, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  28 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

TRUST MERGER

Under a trust, the situation that occurs when the sole trustee and the sole beneficiary are the same person or institution. Then, there's no longer the separati... (more...)
Under a trust, the situation that occurs when the sole trustee and the sole beneficiary are the same person or institution. Then, there's no longer the separation between the trustee's legal ownership of trust property from the beneficiary's interest. The trust 'merges' and ceases to exist.

CONTINGENT BENEFICIARY

1) An alternate beneficiary named in a will, trust or other document. 2) Any person entitled to property under a will if one or more prior conditions are satisf... (more...)
1) An alternate beneficiary named in a will, trust or other document. 2) Any person entitled to property under a will if one or more prior conditions are satisfied. For example, if Fred is entitled to take property under a will only if he's married at the time of the will maker's death, Fred is a contingent beneficiary. Similarly, if Ellen is named to receive a house only in the event her mother, who has been named to live in the house, moves out of it, Ellen is a contingent beneficiary.

ENTITY

An organization, institution or being that has its own existence for legal or tax purposes. An entity is often an organization with an existence separate from i... (more...)
An organization, institution or being that has its own existence for legal or tax purposes. An entity is often an organization with an existence separate from its individual members--for example, a corporation, partnership, trust, estate or government agency. The entity is treated like a person; it can function legally, be sued, and make decisions through agents.

DISTRIBUTEE

(1) Anyone who receives something. Usually, the term refers to someone who inherits a deceased person's property. If the deceased person dies without a will (ca... (more...)
(1) Anyone who receives something. Usually, the term refers to someone who inherits a deceased person's property. If the deceased person dies without a will (called intestate), state law determines what each distributee will receive. Also called a beneficiary.

FAILURE OF ISSUE

A situation in which a person dies without children who could have inherited her property.

BEQUEATH

A legal term sometimes used in wills that means 'leave' -- for example, 'I bequeath my garden tools to my brother-in-law, Buster Jenkins.'

SURROGATE COURT

See probate court.

RESIDUARY ESTATE

The property that remains in a deceased person's estate after all specific gifts are made, and all debts, taxes, administrative fees, probate costs, and court c... (more...)
The property that remains in a deceased person's estate after all specific gifts are made, and all debts, taxes, administrative fees, probate costs, and court costs are paid. The residuary estate also includes any gifts under a will that fail or lapse. For example, Connie's will leaves her house and all its furnishings to Andrew, her VW bug to her friend Carl, and the remainder of her property (the residuary estate) to her sister Sara. She doesn't name any alternate beneficiaries. Carl dies before Connie. The VW bug becomes part of the residuary estate and passes to Sara, along with all of Connie's property other than the house and furnishings. Also called the residual estate or residue.

CERTIFIED COPY

A copy of a document issued by a court or government agency guaranteed to be a true and exact copy of the original. Many agencies and institutions require certi... (more...)
A copy of a document issued by a court or government agency guaranteed to be a true and exact copy of the original. Many agencies and institutions require certified copies of legal documents before permitting certain transactions. For example, a certified copy of a death certificate is required before a bank will release the funds in a deceased person's payable-on-death account to the person who has inherited them.