Portland Estate Lawyer, Maine


Gary W. Libby Lawyer

Gary W. Libby

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Business, Landlord-Tenant, Estate, Elder Law

A 1973 graduate of the Duke University School of Law, Attorney Gary W. Libby was first authorized to practice law in Maine in 1974. He has been dilige... (more)

Francis M. Jackson Lawyer

Francis M. Jackson

VERIFIED
Estate, Social Security -- Disability, Personal Injury, Veterans' Affairs
We get justice for people who have been injured or become disabled.

At Jackson & MacNichol, client service comes first. Founding partner Francis M. “Jack” Jackson wouldn’t have it any other way. “What distin... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-924-2760

Richard F. van Antwerp

Wills & Probate, Workers' Compensation, Family Law, Corporate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Darby C. Urey

Family Law, Wills & Probate, Corporate, Workers' Compensation
Status:  In Good Standing           
Speak with Lawyer.com

Marianna M. Fenton

Business Organization, Family Law, Wills & Probate, Corporate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Lawrence B. Goodglass

Family Law, Wills & Probate, Corporate, Workers' Compensation
Status:  In Good Standing           

J. Daniel Hoffman

Business Organization, Estate Planning, Family Law, Litigation
Status:  In Good Standing           

Todd Richard Ketcham

Real Estate, Estate, Business, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Douglas J. Alofs

Wills & Probate, Workers' Compensation, Family Law, Corporate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  31 Years

Richard D. Bayer

Social Security -- Disability, Estate Planning, Workers' Compensation, Business
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  26 Years

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-620-0900

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-620-0900

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-620-0900

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.


Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

TIPS

Lawyer.com can help you easily and quickly find Portland Estate Lawyers and Portland Estate Law Firms. Refine your search by specific Estate practice areas such as Estate Planning, Trusts, Wills & Probate and Power of Attorney matters.

LEGAL TERMS

PETITION

A formal written request made to a court, asking for an order or ruling on a particular matter. For example, if you want to be appointed conservator for an elde... (more...)
A formal written request made to a court, asking for an order or ruling on a particular matter. For example, if you want to be appointed conservator for an elderly relative, you must file a petition with a court. See also complaint.

EXECUTOR

The person named in a will to handle the property of someone who has died. The executor collects the property, pays debts and taxes, and then distributes what's... (more...)
The person named in a will to handle the property of someone who has died. The executor collects the property, pays debts and taxes, and then distributes what's left, as specified in the will. The executor also handles any probate court proceedings and notifies people and organizations of the death. Also called personal representatives.

POWER OF APPOINTMENT

The legal authority to decide who will receive someone else's property, usually property held in a trust. Most trustees can distribute the income from a trust o... (more...)
The legal authority to decide who will receive someone else's property, usually property held in a trust. Most trustees can distribute the income from a trust only according to the terms of the trust, but a trustee with a power of appointment can choose the beneficiaries, sometimes from a list of candidates specified by the grantor. For example, Karin creates a trust with power of appointment to benefit either the local art museum, symphony, library or park, depending on the trustee's assessment of need.

INTESTATE SUCCESSION

The method by which property is distributed when a person dies without a valid will. Each state's law provides that the property be distributed to the closest s... (more...)
The method by which property is distributed when a person dies without a valid will. Each state's law provides that the property be distributed to the closest surviving relatives. In most states, the surviving spouse, children, parents, siblings, nieces and nephews, and next of kin inherit, in that order.

BEQUEATH

A legal term sometimes used in wills that means 'leave' -- for example, 'I bequeath my garden tools to my brother-in-law, Buster Jenkins.'

TRUST MERGER

Under a trust, the situation that occurs when the sole trustee and the sole beneficiary are the same person or institution. Then, there's no longer the separati... (more...)
Under a trust, the situation that occurs when the sole trustee and the sole beneficiary are the same person or institution. Then, there's no longer the separation between the trustee's legal ownership of trust property from the beneficiary's interest. The trust 'merges' and ceases to exist.

MINERAL RIGHTS

An ownership interest in the minerals contained in a particular parcel of land, with or without ownership of the surface of the land. The owner of mineral right... (more...)
An ownership interest in the minerals contained in a particular parcel of land, with or without ownership of the surface of the land. The owner of mineral rights is usually entitled to either take the minerals from the land himself or receive a royalty from the party that actually extracts the minerals.

ESTATE TAXES

Taxes imposed by the state or federal government on property as it passes from the dead to the living. All property you own, whatever the form of ownership, and... (more...)
Taxes imposed by the state or federal government on property as it passes from the dead to the living. All property you own, whatever the form of ownership, and whether or not it goes through probate after your death, is subject to federal estate tax. Currently, however, federal estate tax is due only if your property is worth at least $2 million when you die. The estate tax is scheduled to be repealed for one year, in 2010, but Congress will probably make the repeal (or a very high exempt amount) permanent. Any property left to a surviving spouse (if he or she is a U.S. citizen) or a tax-exempt charity is exempt from federal estate taxes. Many states now also impose their own estate taxes or inheritance taxes.

DEED OF TRUST

See trust deed.