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Portland RICO Act Lawyer, Oregon


Clarke  Balcom Lawyer

Clarke Balcom

VERIFIED
Bankruptcy & Debt, Criminal, Tax, DUI-DWI

If you are like many hard working Americans who have paid their debt on time, did the right thing and are still facing bankruptcy and foreclosure you ... (more)

Jacob D Braunstein Lawyer

Jacob D Braunstein

VERIFIED
Bankruptcy & Debt, Criminal, Estate, Consumer Rights, Accident & Injury

Jacob D. Braunstein, the founder and managing member of Braunstein Law, PC, is a graduate of Lewis & Clark Law School in Portland, Oregon. During law ... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-853-7151

Neal  Weingart Lawyer

Neal Weingart

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Criminal, Employment, Traffic, DUI-DWI

Have you been arrested for a crime in the Portland area? If so, you cannot afford to wait when it comes to finding the right Portland criminal defense... (more)

Jennie Lynn Clark Lawyer

Jennie Lynn Clark

VERIFIED
Personal Injury, Car Accident, Criminal, Animal Bite, Wrongful Death

I graduated from law school with the goal of working in criminal defense. For approximately the first four years of my practice, I accepted privately ... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-972-8231

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Gregory P. Oliveros Lawyer

Gregory P. Oliveros

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Personal Injury

Gregory Paul Oliveros was born and raised in the Portland area. After graduating from the Oregon College of Education in 1973, he taught in the Por... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-797-7891

David Charles Clarke Lawyer

David Charles Clarke

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Bankruptcy & Debt, DUI-DWI, Personal Injury

I began my career in industry as a process engineer in the fledgling semiconductor manufacturing sector and ended it as an engineering manager for a s... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-299-6770

Mark C Cogan

Civil Rights, Constitutional Law, Traffic, White Collar Crime, DUI-DWI
Status:  In Good Standing           

Randall Vogt

Sexual Harassment, Elder Law, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

H Scott Raivio

Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

AGGRAVATING CIRCUMSTANCES

Circumstances that increase the seriousness or outrageousness of a given crime, and that in turn increase the wrongdoer's penalty or punishment. For example, th... (more...)
Circumstances that increase the seriousness or outrageousness of a given crime, and that in turn increase the wrongdoer's penalty or punishment. For example, the crime of aggravated assault is a physical attack made worse because it is committed with a dangerous weapon, results in severe bodily injury or is made in conjunction with another serious crime. Aggravated assault is usually considered a felony, punishable by a prison sentence.

SELF-DEFENSE

An affirmative defense to a crime. Self-defense is the use of reasonable force to protect oneself from an aggressor. Self-defense shields a person from criminal... (more...)
An affirmative defense to a crime. Self-defense is the use of reasonable force to protect oneself from an aggressor. Self-defense shields a person from criminal liability for the harm inflicted on the aggressor. For example, a robbery victim who takes the robber's weapon and uses it against the robber during a struggle won't be liable for assault and battery since he can show that his action was reasonably necessary to protect himself from imminent harm.

INTERROGATION

A term that describes vigorous questioning, usually by the police of a suspect in custody. Other than providing his name and address, the suspect is not obligat... (more...)
A term that describes vigorous questioning, usually by the police of a suspect in custody. Other than providing his name and address, the suspect is not obligated to answer the questions, and the fact that he has remained silent generally cannot be used by the prosecution to help prove that he is guilty of a crime. If the suspect has asked for a lawyer, the police must cease questioning. If they do not, they cannot use the answers against the suspect at trial.

BAIL BOND

The money posted by a 'bondsman' for a defendant who cannot afford his bail. The defendant pays a certain portion, usually 10%. If the defendant fails to appear... (more...)
The money posted by a 'bondsman' for a defendant who cannot afford his bail. The defendant pays a certain portion, usually 10%. If the defendant fails to appear for a court hearing, the judge can issue a warrant for his arrest and threaten to 'forfeit,' or keep, the money if the defendant doesn't appear soon. Usually, the bondsman will look for the defendant and bring him back, forcefully if necessary, in order to avoid losing the bail money.

NOLO CONTENDERE

A plea entered by the defendant in response to being charged with a crime. If a defendant pleads nolo contendere, she neither admits nor denies that she committ... (more...)
A plea entered by the defendant in response to being charged with a crime. If a defendant pleads nolo contendere, she neither admits nor denies that she committed the crime, but agrees to a punishment (usually a fine or jail time) as if guilty. Usually, this type of plea is entered because it can't be used as an admission of guilt if a civil case is held after the criminal trial.

VENIREMEN

People who are summoned to the courthouse so that they may be questioned and perhaps chosen as jurors in trials of civil or criminal cases.

DIRECTED VERDICT

A ruling by a judge, typically made after the plaintiff has presented all of her evidence but before the defendant puts on his case, that awards judgment to the... (more...)
A ruling by a judge, typically made after the plaintiff has presented all of her evidence but before the defendant puts on his case, that awards judgment to the defendant. A directed verdict is usually made because the judge concludes the plaintiff has failed to offer the minimum amount of evidence to prove her case even if there were no opposition. In other words, the judge is saying that, as a matter of law, no reasonable jury could decide in the plaintiff's favor. In a criminal case, a directed verdict is a judgement of acquittal for the defendant.

ACTUS REUS

Latin for a 'guilty act.' The actus reus is the act which, in combination with a certain mental state, such as intent or recklessness, constitutes a crime. For ... (more...)
Latin for a 'guilty act.' The actus reus is the act which, in combination with a certain mental state, such as intent or recklessness, constitutes a crime. For example, the crime of theft requires physically taking something (the actus reus) coupled with the intent to permanently deprive the owner of the object (the mental state, or mens rea).

BAIL

The money paid to the court, usually at arraignment or shortly thereafter, to ensure that an arrested person who is released from jail will show up at all requi... (more...)
The money paid to the court, usually at arraignment or shortly thereafter, to ensure that an arrested person who is released from jail will show up at all required court appearances. The amount of bail is determined by the local bail schedule, which is based on the seriousness of the offense. The judge can increase the bail if the prosecutor convinces him that the defendant is likely to flee (for example, if he has failed to show up in court in the past), or he can decrease it if the defense attorney shows that the defendant is unlikely to run (for example, he has strong ties to the community by way of a steady job and a family).