Portland RICO Act Lawyer, Oregon

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Jennie Lynn Clark Lawyer

Jennie Lynn Clark

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Personal Injury, Criminal, Animal Bite, DUI-DWI

I graduated from law school with the goal of working in criminal defense. For approximately the first four years of my practice, I accepted privately ... (more)

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800-722-8790

Westbrook  Johnson Lawyer

Westbrook Johnson

VERIFIED
Criminal, Search & Seizure Protections, DUI-DWI, Domestic Violence & Neglect, Felony

Westbrook was born and raised in Petersburg, Virginia. Petersburg is a small city in southern Virginia that had been a hotspot in the Civil Rights Mov... (more)

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800-734-0750

Gregory P. Oliveros Lawyer

Gregory P. Oliveros

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Divorce & Family Law, Criminal

Gregory Paul Oliveros was born and raised in the Portland area. After graduating from the Oregon College of Education in 1973, he taught in the Portla... (more)

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800-797-7891

Higinio  Arellano Lawyer

Higinio Arellano

VERIFIED
Criminal, Accident & Injury, Real Estate, Business

Higinio Arellano obtained his bachelor’s of science degree from Berkeley and a Juris Doctor degree from Sandra Day O’Connor Law School in Arizona.... (more)

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Mark G. Obert Lawyer

Mark G. Obert

VERIFIED
Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Accident & Injury, Estate, Real Estate

Committed to delivering quality legal counsel at an affordable price to businesses, individuals, and organizations. Johnstone & Obert is a law firm... (more)

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503-472-9555

Mark J Geiger Lawyer

Mark J Geiger

VERIFIED
Criminal, Traffic, Juvenile Law
Committed to Protecting the Rights of the Accused

You may be wondering how to choose the right law office when you are in need of legal representation. There are plenty of options in Salem, Oregon, bu... (more)

H Scott Raivio

Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Randall Vogt

Sexual Harassment, Sexual Harassment, Criminal, Civil & Human Rights, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

Priscilla L. Seaborg

Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Juvenile Law, US Courts
Status:  In Good Standing           

David C. Lewis

Federal Appellate Practice, Criminal, Constitutional Law, Civil Rights
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

EXECUTIVE PRIVILEGE

The privilege that allows the president and other high officials of the executive branch to keep certain communications private if disclosing those communicatio... (more...)
The privilege that allows the president and other high officials of the executive branch to keep certain communications private if disclosing those communications would disrupt the functions or decisionmaking processes of the executive branch. As demonstrated by the Watergate hearings, this privilege does not extend to information germane to a criminal investigation.

DISTRICT ATTORNEY (D.A.)

A lawyer who is elected to represent a state government in criminal cases in a designated county or judicial district. A D.A.'s duties typically include reviewi... (more...)
A lawyer who is elected to represent a state government in criminal cases in a designated county or judicial district. A D.A.'s duties typically include reviewing police arrest reports, deciding whether to bring criminal charges against arrested people and prosecuting criminal cases in court. The D.A. may also supervise other attorneys, called Deputy District Attorneys or Assistant District Attorneys. In some states a District Attorney may be called a Prosecuting Attorney, County Attorney or State's Attorney. In the federal system, the equivalent to the D.A. is a United States Attorney. The country has many U.S. Attorneys, each appointed by the President, who supervise regional offices staffed with prosecutors called Assistant United States Attorneys.

FELONY

A serious crime (contrasted with misdemeanors and infractions, less serious crimes), usually punishable by a prison term of more than one year or, in some cases... (more...)
A serious crime (contrasted with misdemeanors and infractions, less serious crimes), usually punishable by a prison term of more than one year or, in some cases, by death. For example, murder, extortion and kidnapping are felonies; a minor fist fight is usually charged as a misdemeanor, and a speeding ticket is generally an infraction.

HABEAS CORPUS

Latin for 'You have the body.' A prisoner files a petition for writ of habeas corpus in order to challenge the authority of the prison or jail warden to continu... (more...)
Latin for 'You have the body.' A prisoner files a petition for writ of habeas corpus in order to challenge the authority of the prison or jail warden to continue to hold him. If the judge orders a hearing after reading the writ, the prisoner gets to argue that his confinement is illegal. These writs are frequently filed by convicted prisoners who challenge their conviction on the grounds that the trial attorney failed to prepare the defense and was incompetent. Prisoners sentenced to death also file habeas petitions challenging the constitutionality of the state death penalty law. Habeas writs are different from and do not replace appeals, which are arguments for reversal of a conviction based on claims that the judge conducted the trial improperly. Often, convicted prisoners file both.

MISDEMEANOR

A crime, less serious than a felony, punishable by no more than one year in jail. Petty theft (of articles worth less than a certain amount), first-time drunk d... (more...)
A crime, less serious than a felony, punishable by no more than one year in jail. Petty theft (of articles worth less than a certain amount), first-time drunk driving and leaving the scene of an accident are all common misdemeanors.

NOLO CONTENDERE

A plea entered by the defendant in response to being charged with a crime. If a defendant pleads nolo contendere, she neither admits nor denies that she committ... (more...)
A plea entered by the defendant in response to being charged with a crime. If a defendant pleads nolo contendere, she neither admits nor denies that she committed the crime, but agrees to a punishment (usually a fine or jail time) as if guilty. Usually, this type of plea is entered because it can't be used as an admission of guilt if a civil case is held after the criminal trial.

PRESUMPTION OF INNOCENCE

One of the most sacred principles in the American criminal justice system, holding that a defendant is innocent until proven guilty. In other words, the prosecu... (more...)
One of the most sacred principles in the American criminal justice system, holding that a defendant is innocent until proven guilty. In other words, the prosecution must prove, beyond a reasonable doubt, each element of the crime charged.

JURY

Criminal Law Traffic TicketshomeGLOSSARY jury A group of people selected to apply the law, as stated by the judge, to the facts of a case and render a decision,... (more...)
Criminal Law Traffic TicketshomeGLOSSARY jury A group of people selected to apply the law, as stated by the judge, to the facts of a case and render a decision, called the verdict. Traditionally, an American jury was made up of 12 people who had to arrive at a unanimous decision. But today, in many states, juries in civil cases may be composed of as few as six members and non-unanimous verdicts may be permitted. (Most states still require 12-person, unanimous verdicts for criminal trials.) Tracing its history back over 1,000 years, the jury system was brought to England by William the Conqueror in 1066. The philosophy behind the jury system is that--especially in a criminal case--an accused's guilt or innocence should be judged by a group of people from her community ('a jury of her peers'). Recently, some courts have been experimenting with increasing the traditionally rather passive role of the jury by encouraging jurors to take notes and ask questions.

CORPUS DELECTI

Latin for the 'body of the crime.' Used to describe physical evidence, such as the corpse of a murder victim or the charred frame of a torched building.