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Portland Felony Lawyer, Oregon


Clarke  Balcom Lawyer

Clarke Balcom

VERIFIED
Bankruptcy & Debt, Criminal, Tax, DUI-DWI

If you are like many hard working Americans who have paid their debt on time, did the right thing and are still facing bankruptcy and foreclosure you ... (more)

Jacob D Braunstein Lawyer

Jacob D Braunstein

VERIFIED
Bankruptcy & Debt, Criminal, Estate, Consumer Rights, Accident & Injury

Jacob D. Braunstein, the founder and managing member of Braunstein Law, PC, is a graduate of Lewis & Clark Law School in Portland, Oregon. During law ... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-853-7151

Neal  Weingart Lawyer

Neal Weingart

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Criminal, Employment, Traffic, DUI-DWI

Have you been arrested for a crime in the Portland area? If so, you cannot afford to wait when it comes to finding the right Portland criminal defense... (more)

Jennie Lynn Clark Lawyer

Jennie Lynn Clark

VERIFIED
Personal Injury, Civil Rights, Criminal, Insurance, Business

I graduated from law school with the goal of working in criminal defense. For approximately the first four years of my practice, I accepted privately ... (more)

Gregory P. Oliveros Lawyer

Gregory P. Oliveros

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Personal Injury

Gregory Paul Oliveros was born and raised in the Portland area. After graduating from the Oregon College of Education in 1973, he taught in the Por... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-797-7891

David Charles Clarke Lawyer

David Charles Clarke

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Bankruptcy & Debt, DUI-DWI, Personal Injury

I began my career in industry as a process engineer in the fledgling semiconductor manufacturing sector and ended it as an engineering manager for a s... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-299-6770

Mark C Cogan

Civil Rights, Constitutional Law, Traffic, White Collar Crime, DUI-DWI
Status:  In Good Standing           

Randall Vogt

Sexual Harassment, Elder Law, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

H Scott Raivio

Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

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LEGAL TERMS

INSANITY

See criminal insanity.

ACCOMPLICE

Someone who helps another person (known as the principal) commit a crime. Unlike an accessory, an accomplice is usually present when the crime is committed. An ... (more...)
Someone who helps another person (known as the principal) commit a crime. Unlike an accessory, an accomplice is usually present when the crime is committed. An accomplice is guilty of the same offense and usually receives the same sentence as the principal. For instance, the driver of the getaway car for a burglary is an accomplice and will be guilty of the burglary even though he may not have entered the building.

SELF-INCRIMINATION

The making of statements that might expose you to criminal prosecution, either now or in the future. The 5th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution prohibits the go... (more...)
The making of statements that might expose you to criminal prosecution, either now or in the future. The 5th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution prohibits the government from forcing you to provide evidence (as in answering questions) that would or might lead to your prosecution for a crime.

INADMISSIBLE EVIDENCE

Testimony or other evidence that fails to meet state or federal court rules governing the types of evidence that can be presented to a judge or jury. The main r... (more...)
Testimony or other evidence that fails to meet state or federal court rules governing the types of evidence that can be presented to a judge or jury. The main reason why evidence is ruled inadmissible is because it falls into a category deemed so unreliable that a court should not consider it as part of a deciding a case --for example, hearsay evidence, or an expert's opinion that is not based on facts generally accepted in the field. Evidence will also be declared inadmissible if it suffers from some other defect--for example, as compared to its value, it will take too long to present or risks enflaming the jury, as might be the case with graphic pictures of a homicide victim. In addition, in criminal cases, evidence that is gathered using illegal methods is commonly ruled inadmissible. Because the rules of evidence are so complicated (and because contesting lawyers waste so much time arguing over them) there is a strong trend towards using mediation or arbitration to resolve civil disputes. In mediation and arbitration, virtually all evidence can be considered. See evidence, admissible evidence.

OWN RECOGNIZANCE (OR)

A way the defendant can get out of jail, without paying bail, by promising to appear in court when next required to be there. Sometimes called 'personal recogni... (more...)
A way the defendant can get out of jail, without paying bail, by promising to appear in court when next required to be there. Sometimes called 'personal recognizance.' Only those with strong ties to the community, such as a steady job, local family and no history of failing to appear in court, are good candidates for 'OR' release. If the charge is very serious, however, OR may not be an option.

CHARGE

A formal accusation of criminal activity. The prosecuting attorney decides on the charges, after reviewing police reports, witness statements and any other evid... (more...)
A formal accusation of criminal activity. The prosecuting attorney decides on the charges, after reviewing police reports, witness statements and any other evidence of wrongdoing. Formal charges are announced at an arrested person's arraignment.

CRIME

A type of behavior that is has been defined by the state, as deserving of punishment which usually includes imprisonment. Crimes and their punishments are defin... (more...)
A type of behavior that is has been defined by the state, as deserving of punishment which usually includes imprisonment. Crimes and their punishments are defined by Congress and state legislatures.

MISTRIAL

A trial that ends prematurely and without a judgment, due either to a mistake that jeopardizes a party's right to a fair trial or to a jury that can't agree on ... (more...)
A trial that ends prematurely and without a judgment, due either to a mistake that jeopardizes a party's right to a fair trial or to a jury that can't agree on a verdict (a hung jury) If a judge declares a mistrial in a civil case, he or she will direct that the case be set for a new trial at a future date. Mistrials in criminal cases can result in a retrial, a plea bargain or a dismissal of the charges.

BAILIFF

A court official usually classified as a peace officer (sometimes as a deputy sheriff, or marshal) and usually wearing a uniform. A bailiff's main job is to mai... (more...)
A court official usually classified as a peace officer (sometimes as a deputy sheriff, or marshal) and usually wearing a uniform. A bailiff's main job is to maintain order in the courtroom. In addition, bailiffs often help court proceedings go smoothly by shepherding witnesses in and out of the courtroom and handing evidence to witnesses as they testify. In criminal cases, the bailiff may have temporary charge of any defendant who is in custody during court proceedings.