Saint Louis Misdemeanor Lawyer, Missouri


Christopher M. Combs Lawyer

Christopher M. Combs

VERIFIED
Criminal, DUI-DWI, Felony, Misdemeanor, White Collar Crime
Combs Waterkotte in the Community

Attorney Christopher Combs is the founder and partner of Combs Waterkotte in St. Louis, MO. A top-rated trial lawyer with more than seven years total ... (more)

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CONTACT

800-817-0710

Mark R Bates Lawyer

Mark R Bates

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Workers' Compensation, Employment, Insurance
Relationships That Drive Results

Mark Bates has practiced law for over 30 years, primarily in Missouri and Illinois. He specializes in employment law and workers' compensation. Over... (more)

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CONTACT

800-908-7871

Richard C Reuben Lawyer

Richard C Reuben

Traffic, DUI-DWI

Meet Richard C Reuben, a skilled lawyer who specializes in handling traffic tickets in Missouri. With years of experience in the legal field, Richard ... (more)

Fredrick J. Ludwig Lawyer

Fredrick J. Ludwig

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Car Accident, Criminal

Fredrick Ludwig is a practicing lawyer in the state of Missouri handling personal injury matters.

Thomas G. Lemley Lawyer

Thomas G. Lemley

Social Security, Social Security, Felony
Eric  Boehmer Lawyer

Eric Boehmer

VERIFIED
Criminal, Accident & Injury, Juvenile Law, Divorce & Family Law
Award Winning and Experienced Attorney

Eric Boehmer is an award winning attorney with the experience, confidence and knowledge to deal with the authorities when it comes to defending indivi... (more)

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CONTACT

800-717-6021

Richard A. Gartner Lawyer

Richard A. Gartner

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Criminal, Adoption

Richard Gartner has been actively practicing law for the last 38 years, garnering the highest honors alongside countless trials in and around St. Char... (more)

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CONTACT

800-711-9030

Travis W. T. Grafe Lawyer

Travis W. T. Grafe

VERIFIED
Criminal, DUI-DWI, Felony, Misdemeanor
We Help People Who Are Charged With Crimes

Travis W. T. Grafe was born and raised in Belleville, Illinois, where he graduated from Belleville Township High School West in 1995. Mr. Grafe attend... (more)

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CONTACT

800-970-7201

David Gutwein

Bankruptcy, Criminal, Traffic
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Michael P. Cohan

Traffic, Family Law, Child Support, DUI-DWI
Status:  In Good Standing           

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CONTACT

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

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LEGAL TERMS

DISCOVERY

A formal investigation -- governed by court rules -- that is conducted before trial. Discovery allows one party to question other parties, and sometimes witness... (more...)
A formal investigation -- governed by court rules -- that is conducted before trial. Discovery allows one party to question other parties, and sometimes witnesses. It also allows one party to force the others to produce requested documents or other physical evidence. The most common types of discovery are interrogatories, consisting of written questions the other party must answer under penalty of perjury, and depositions, which involve an in-person session at which one party to a lawsuit has the opportunity to ask oral questions of the other party or her witnesses under oath while a written transcript is made by a court reporter. Other types of pretrial discovery consist of written requests to produce documents and requests for admissions, by which one party asks the other to admit or deny key facts in the case. One major purpose of discovery is to assess the strength or weakness of an opponent's case, with the idea of opening settlement talks. Another is to gather information to use at trial. Discovery is also present in criminal cases, in which by law the prosecutor must turn over to the defense any witness statements and any evidence that might tend to exonerate the defendant. Depending on the rules of the court, the defendant may also be obliged to share evidence with the prosecutor.

PRESUMPTION OF INNOCENCE

One of the most sacred principles in the American criminal justice system, holding that a defendant is innocent until proven guilty. In other words, the prosecu... (more...)
One of the most sacred principles in the American criminal justice system, holding that a defendant is innocent until proven guilty. In other words, the prosecution must prove, beyond a reasonable doubt, each element of the crime charged.

PROSECUTOR

A lawyer who works for the local, state or federal government to bring and litigate criminal cases.

IMPRISON

To put a person in prison or jail or otherwise confine him as punishment for committing a crime.

NOLLE PROSEQUI

Latin for 'we shall no longer prosecute.' At trial, this is an entry made on the record by a prosecutor in a criminal case stating that he will no longer pursue... (more...)
Latin for 'we shall no longer prosecute.' At trial, this is an entry made on the record by a prosecutor in a criminal case stating that he will no longer pursue the matter. An entry of nolle prosequi may be made at any time after charges are brought and before a verdict is returned or a plea entered. Essentially, it is an admission on the part of the prosecution that some aspect of its case against the defendant has fallen apart. Most of the time, prosecutors need a judge's A1:C576 to 'nol-pros' a case. (See Federal Rule of Criminal Procedure 48a.) Abbreviated 'nol. pros.' or 'nol-pros.'

DIRECTED VERDICT

A ruling by a judge, typically made after the plaintiff has presented all of her evidence but before the defendant puts on his case, that awards judgment to the... (more...)
A ruling by a judge, typically made after the plaintiff has presented all of her evidence but before the defendant puts on his case, that awards judgment to the defendant. A directed verdict is usually made because the judge concludes the plaintiff has failed to offer the minimum amount of evidence to prove her case even if there were no opposition. In other words, the judge is saying that, as a matter of law, no reasonable jury could decide in the plaintiff's favor. In a criminal case, a directed verdict is a judgement of acquittal for the defendant.

SELF-INCRIMINATION

The making of statements that might expose you to criminal prosecution, either now or in the future. The 5th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution prohibits the go... (more...)
The making of statements that might expose you to criminal prosecution, either now or in the future. The 5th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution prohibits the government from forcing you to provide evidence (as in answering questions) that would or might lead to your prosecution for a crime.

INTERROGATION

A term that describes vigorous questioning, usually by the police of a suspect in custody. Other than providing his name and address, the suspect is not obligat... (more...)
A term that describes vigorous questioning, usually by the police of a suspect in custody. Other than providing his name and address, the suspect is not obligated to answer the questions, and the fact that he has remained silent generally cannot be used by the prosecution to help prove that he is guilty of a crime. If the suspect has asked for a lawyer, the police must cease questioning. If they do not, they cannot use the answers against the suspect at trial.

CIVIL

Noncriminal. See civil case.