Saint Louis Felony Lawyer, Missouri


Christopher M. Combs Lawyer

Christopher M. Combs

VERIFIED
Criminal, DUI-DWI, Felony, Misdemeanor, White Collar Crime
Combs Waterkotte in the Community

Attorney Christopher Combs is the founder and partner of Combs Waterkotte in St. Louis, MO. A top-rated trial lawyer with more than seven years total ... (more)

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CONTACT

800-817-0710

Mark R Bates Lawyer

Mark R Bates

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Workers' Compensation, Employment, Insurance
Relationships That Drive Results

Mark Bates has practiced law for over 30 years, primarily in Missouri and Illinois. He specializes in employment law and workers' compensation. Over... (more)

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CONTACT

800-908-7871

Richard C Reuben Lawyer

Richard C Reuben

Traffic, DUI-DWI

Meet Richard C Reuben, a skilled lawyer who specializes in handling traffic tickets in Missouri. With years of experience in the legal field, Richard ... (more)

Fredrick J. Ludwig Lawyer

Fredrick J. Ludwig

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Car Accident, Criminal

Fredrick Ludwig is a practicing lawyer in the state of Missouri handling personal injury matters.

Thomas G. Lemley Lawyer

Thomas G. Lemley

Social Security, Social Security, Felony
Eric  Boehmer Lawyer

Eric Boehmer

VERIFIED
Criminal, Accident & Injury, Juvenile Law, Divorce & Family Law
Award Winning and Experienced Attorney

Eric Boehmer is an award winning attorney with the experience, confidence and knowledge to deal with the authorities when it comes to defending indivi... (more)

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CONTACT

800-717-6021

Richard A. Gartner Lawyer

Richard A. Gartner

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Criminal, Adoption

Richard Gartner has been actively practicing law for the last 38 years, garnering the highest honors alongside countless trials in and around St. Char... (more)

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CONTACT

800-711-9030

Travis W. T. Grafe Lawyer

Travis W. T. Grafe

VERIFIED
Criminal, DUI-DWI, Felony, Misdemeanor
We Help People Who Are Charged With Crimes

Travis W. T. Grafe was born and raised in Belleville, Illinois, where he graduated from Belleville Township High School West in 1995. Mr. Grafe attend... (more)

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CONTACT

800-970-7201

David Gutwein

Bankruptcy, Criminal, Traffic
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Michael P. Cohan

Traffic, Family Law, Child Support, DUI-DWI
Status:  In Good Standing           

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CONTACT

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

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LEGAL TERMS

MCNAGHTEN RULE

The earliest and most common test for criminal insanity, in which a criminal defendant is judged legally insane only if he could not distinguish right from wron... (more...)
The earliest and most common test for criminal insanity, in which a criminal defendant is judged legally insane only if he could not distinguish right from wrong at the time he committed the crime. For example, a delusional psychotic who believed that his assaultive acts were in response to the will of God would not be criminally responsible for his acts.

BOOKING

A quaint phrase that refers to the recording of an arrested person's name, age, address and reason for arrest when that person is brought to jail and placed beh... (more...)
A quaint phrase that refers to the recording of an arrested person's name, age, address and reason for arrest when that person is brought to jail and placed behind bars. Nowadays, the book is likely to be a computer. Usually, a mug shot and fingerprints are taken, and the arrestee's clothing and personal effects are inventoried and stored.

SELF-INCRIMINATION

The making of statements that might expose you to criminal prosecution, either now or in the future. The 5th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution prohibits the go... (more...)
The making of statements that might expose you to criminal prosecution, either now or in the future. The 5th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution prohibits the government from forcing you to provide evidence (as in answering questions) that would or might lead to your prosecution for a crime.

CONTINGENCY FEE

A method of paying a lawyer for legal representation by which, instead of an hourly or per job fee, the lawyer receives a percentage of the money her client obt... (more...)
A method of paying a lawyer for legal representation by which, instead of an hourly or per job fee, the lawyer receives a percentage of the money her client obtains after settling or winning the case. Often contingency fee agreements -- which are most commonly used in personal injury cases -- award the successful lawyer between 20% and 50% of the amount recovered. Lawyers representing defendants charged with crimes may not charge contingency fees. In most states, contingency fee agreements must be in writing.

PRESUMPTION OF INNOCENCE

One of the most sacred principles in the American criminal justice system, holding that a defendant is innocent until proven guilty. In other words, the prosecu... (more...)
One of the most sacred principles in the American criminal justice system, holding that a defendant is innocent until proven guilty. In other words, the prosecution must prove, beyond a reasonable doubt, each element of the crime charged.

CORPUS DELECTI

Latin for the 'body of the crime.' Used to describe physical evidence, such as the corpse of a murder victim or the charred frame of a torched building.

CHARGE

A formal accusation of criminal activity. The prosecuting attorney decides on the charges, after reviewing police reports, witness statements and any other evid... (more...)
A formal accusation of criminal activity. The prosecuting attorney decides on the charges, after reviewing police reports, witness statements and any other evidence of wrongdoing. Formal charges are announced at an arrested person's arraignment.

JURY NULLIFICATION

A decision by the jury to acquit a defendant who has violated a law that the jury believes is unjust or wrong. Jury nullification has always been an option for ... (more...)
A decision by the jury to acquit a defendant who has violated a law that the jury believes is unjust or wrong. Jury nullification has always been an option for juries in England and the United States, although judges will prevent a defense lawyer from urging the jury to acquit on this basis. Nullification was evident during the Vietnam war (when selective service protesters were acquitted by juries opposed to the war) and currently appears in criminal cases when the jury disagrees with the punishment--for example, in 'three strikes' cases when the jury realizes that conviction of a relatively minor offense will result in lifetime imprisonment.

INFORMED CONSENT

An agreement to do something or to allow something to happen, made with complete knowledge of all relevant facts, such as the risks involved or any available al... (more...)
An agreement to do something or to allow something to happen, made with complete knowledge of all relevant facts, such as the risks involved or any available alternatives. For example, a patient may give informed consent to medical treatment only after the healthcare professional has disclosed all possible risks involved in accepting or rejecting the treatment. A healthcare provider or facility may be held responsible for an injury caused by an undisclosed risk. In another context, a person accused of committing a crime cannot give up his constitutional rights--for example, to remain silent or to talk with an attorney--unless and until he has been informed of those rights, usually via the well-known Miranda warnings.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Turner v. State

... Atty. Gen., Richard A. Starnes, Asst. Atty. Gen., for respondent. STEPHEN N. LIMBAUGH, JR., Judge. Reginald Turner appeals the denial of his Rule 24.035 motion for post-conviction relief after his plea of guilty to the class D felony of driving while intoxicated. ...

Melton v. State

... Movant was charged with one count of the Class A felony of second-degree drug trafficking in violation of Section 195.223 [2] and two counts of the class D felony of possessing ephedrine with intent to manufacture methamphetamine in violation of Section 195.246. ...

State v. Moore

... PATRICIA BRECKENRIDGE, Judge. Following the revocation of Michael Moore's probation in two separate criminal cases, the sentencing judge ordered execution of Mr. Moore's previously imposed sentences for felony driving while intoxicated. ...