Southfield Family Law Lawyer, Michigan

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Includes: Collaborative Law, Domestic Violence & Neglect, Paternity, Prenuptial Agreements

Carl E. Sears Lawyer

Carl E. Sears

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Child Custody, Custody & Visitation, Child Support, Paternity

Carl E. Sears has a wealth of experience representing individuals just like you with their family law matters. He knows family laws and has the skills... (more)

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800-692-9880

Bert Tiger Whitehead Lawyer

Bert Tiger Whitehead

VERIFIED
Estate, Contract, Elder Law, Family Law
Affordable law firm providing help to individuals, small businesses, and non-profits.

Mr. Whitehead is the owner and president of Access Legal Care, PLLC. Although the firm is headquartered in Garden City, Michigan, the firm provides li... (more)

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800-959-7951

Richard M. Halprin Lawyer

Richard M. Halprin

VERIFIED
Criminal, Family Law, Juvenile Law, Litigation

As an experienced attorney and district court magistrate, Richard Halprin has cultivated a network of relationships within the legal community, includ... (more)

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800-942-4470

Mark G Cooper

Real Estate, Estate Planning, Family Law, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Susan S. Lichterman

Litigation, Lawsuit & Dispute, Family Law, Divorce & Family Law
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Sharon J. LaDuke

Family Law, Litigation
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Mark A. Satawa

Domestic Violence & Neglect, DUI-DWI, Criminal, Constitutional Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Heather M. Dorn

Business Organization, Family Law, Wills & Probate, Collaborative Law
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Patricia Gormely Prince

Family Law, Wills & Probate, Business Organization, Elder Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Pamela Fae Radzinski

Family Law, Divorce, Bankruptcy, Farms
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

CHILD SUPPORT

The entitlement of all children to be supported by their parents until the children reach the age of majority or become emancipated -- usually by marriage, by e... (more...)
The entitlement of all children to be supported by their parents until the children reach the age of majority or become emancipated -- usually by marriage, by entry into the armed forces or by living independently. Many states also impose child support obligations on parents for a year or two beyond this point if the child is a full-time student. If the parents are living separately, they each must still support the children. Typically, the parent who has custody meets his or her support obligation through taking care of the child every day, while the other parent must make payments to the custodial parent on behalf of the child -- usually cash but sometimes other kinds of contributions. When parents divorce, the court almost always orders the non-custodial parent to pay the custodial parent an amount of child support fixed by state law. Sometimes, however, if the parents share physical custody more or less equally, the court will order the higher-income parent to make payments to the lower-income parent.

GUARDIAN

An adult who has been given the legal right by a court to control and care for a minor or her property. Someone who looks after a child's property is called a '... (more...)
An adult who has been given the legal right by a court to control and care for a minor or her property. Someone who looks after a child's property is called a 'guardian of the estate.' An adult who has legal authority to make personal decisions for the child, including responsibility for his physical, medical and educational needs, is called a 'guardian of the person.' Sometimes just one person will be named to take care of all these tasks. An individual appointed by a court to look after an incapacitated adult may also be known as a guardian, but is more frequently called a conservator.

ABANDONMENT (OF A CHILD)

A parent's failure to provide any financial assistance to or communicate with his or her child over a period of time. When this happens, a court may deem the ch... (more...)
A parent's failure to provide any financial assistance to or communicate with his or her child over a period of time. When this happens, a court may deem the child abandoned by that parent and order that person's parental rights terminated. Abandonment also describes situations in which a child is physically abandoned -- for example, left on a doorstep, delivered to a hospital or put in a trash can. Physically abandoned children are usually placed in orphanages and made available for adoption.

JOINT CUSTODY

An arrangement by which parents who do not live together share the upbringing of a child. Joint custody can be joint legal custody (in which both parents have a... (more...)
An arrangement by which parents who do not live together share the upbringing of a child. Joint custody can be joint legal custody (in which both parents have a say in decisions affecting the child) joint physical custody (in which the child spends a significant amount of time with both parents) or, very rarely, both.

STEPPARENT ADOPTION

The formal, legal adoption of a child by a stepparent who is living with a legal parent. Most states have special provisions making stepparent adoptions relativ... (more...)
The formal, legal adoption of a child by a stepparent who is living with a legal parent. Most states have special provisions making stepparent adoptions relatively easy if the child's noncustodial parent gives consent, is dead or missing, or has abandoned the child.

FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT (FMLA)

A federal law that requires employers to provide an employee with 12 weeks of unpaid leave during a year's time for the birth or adoption of a child, family hea... (more...)
A federal law that requires employers to provide an employee with 12 weeks of unpaid leave during a year's time for the birth or adoption of a child, family health needs or personal illness. The employer must allow the employee to return to the same position or a position similar to that held before taking the leave. There are exceptions to the FMLA: the most notable is that only employers with 50 or more employees are covered--about half the workforce.

MARITAL SETTLEMENT AGREEMENT

See divorce agreement.

ACKNOWLEDGED FATHER

The biological father of a child born to an unmarried couple who has been established as the father either by his admission or by an agreement between him and t... (more...)
The biological father of a child born to an unmarried couple who has been established as the father either by his admission or by an agreement between him and the child's mother. An acknowledged father must pay child support.

CONFIDENTIAL COMMUNICATION

Information exchanged between two people who (1) have a relationship in which private communications are protected by law, and (2) intend that the information b... (more...)
Information exchanged between two people who (1) have a relationship in which private communications are protected by law, and (2) intend that the information be kept in confidence. The law recognizes certain parties whose communications will be considered confidential and protected, including spouses, doctor and patient, attorney and client, and priest and confessor. Communications between these individuals cannot be disclosed in court unless the protected party waives that protection. The intention that the communication be confidential is critical. For example, if an attorney and his client are discussing a matter in the presence of an unnecessary third party -- for example, in an elevator with other people present -- the discussion will not be considered confidential and may be admitted at trial. Also known as privileged communication.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Johnson Family Ltd. Partnership v. White Pine Wireless, LLC

... At the time, the Johnson Family Trust (the Trust) served as the general partner for the Partnership. ... 480, 482, 722 NW2d 906 (2006). Whether a grant of equitable relief is proper under a given set of facts is a question of law that this Court also reviews de novo. ...

Estes v. Titus

... Toth), Kalamazoo, for Julie L. Swabash. Speaker Law Firm, PLLC (by Liisa R. Speaker and Jodi M. Latuszek), Lansing, for amici curiae the Family Law Section of the State Bar of Michigan. Howard & Howard Attorneys, PC (by ...

Sinicropi v. Mazurek

... 232, 241, 86 NW2d 336 (1957). Here, the trial court drew on virtually all the traditional equitable principles applicable in family-law cases: the best interest of the child, the fitness of the competing parents, and the past relationships of the parties. ...