Vevay Bankruptcy & Debt Lawyer, Indiana


C. Paige Gabhart

Divorce & Family Law, Bankruptcy & Debt, Criminal, Traffic, Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Justin Key

Lawsuit & Dispute, Estate, Employment, Divorce & Family Law, Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           

Wilmer Edward Goering

Lawsuit & Dispute, Criminal, Bankruptcy & Debt, Accident & Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  45 Years

Jeff Flores

Accident & Injury, Bankruptcy & Debt, Criminal, Divorce & Family Law

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Ann Elizabeth Schwartz

Government, Adoption, Bankruptcy, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

Ann Elizabeth Schwartz

Government, Child Custody, Adoption, Bankruptcy, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  19 Years

Ashley Christine Eklund

Social Security, Workers' Compensation, Bankruptcy, Personal Injury, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  5 Years

Heidi Annette Kendall-Sage

Civil Rights, Civil & Human Rights, Bankruptcy, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  27 Years

Robert Patrick Magrath

Other, Workers' Compensation, Bankruptcy, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  15 Years

Colby Jon Leonard

Bankruptcy, Credit & Debt, Business Organization, Consumer Protection
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

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Lawyer.com can help you easily and quickly find Vevay Bankruptcy & Debt Lawyers and Vevay Bankruptcy & Debt Law Firms. Refine your search by specific Bankruptcy & Debt practice areas such as Bankruptcy, Collection, Credit & Debt, Reorganization and Workout matters.

LEGAL TERMS

LIEN

The right of a secured creditor to grab a specific item of property if you don't pay a debt. Liens you agree to are called security interests, and include mortg... (more...)
The right of a secured creditor to grab a specific item of property if you don't pay a debt. Liens you agree to are called security interests, and include mortgages, home equity loans, car loans and personal loans for which you pledge property to guarantee repayment. Liens created without your consent are called nonconsensual liens, and include judgment liens (liens filed by a creditor who has sued you and obtained a judgment), tax liens and mechanics liens (liens filed by a contractor who worked on your house but wasn't paid).

LIQUIDATING PARTNER

The member of an insolvent or dissolving partnership responsible for paying the debts and settling the accounts of the partnership.

WORKOUT

A debtor's plan to take care of a debt, by paying it off or through loan forgiveness. Workouts are often created to avoid bankruptcy or foreclosure proceedings.

CREDITOR

A person or entity (such as a bank) to whom a debt is owed.

FRAUDULENT TRANSFER

In a bankruptcy case, a transfer of property to another for less than the property's value for the purpose of hiding the property from the bankruptcy trustee --... (more...)
In a bankruptcy case, a transfer of property to another for less than the property's value for the purpose of hiding the property from the bankruptcy trustee -- for instance, when a debtor signs a car over to a relative to keep it out of the bankruptcy estate. Fraudulently transferred property can be recovered and sold by the trustee for the benefit of the creditors.

NONEXEMPT PROPERTY

The property you risk losing to your creditors when you file a Chapter 7 bankruptcy or when a creditor sues you and wins a judgment. Nonexempt property typicall... (more...)
The property you risk losing to your creditors when you file a Chapter 7 bankruptcy or when a creditor sues you and wins a judgment. Nonexempt property typically includes valuable clothing (furs) and electronic equipment, an expensive car that's been paid off and most of the equity in your house. Compare exempt property.

FRATERNAL BENEFIT SOCIETY BENEFITS

These are benefits, often group life insurance, paid for by fraternal societies to their members. Elks, Masons or Knights of Columbus are common fraternal socie... (more...)
These are benefits, often group life insurance, paid for by fraternal societies to their members. Elks, Masons or Knights of Columbus are common fraternal societies that provide benefits. Also called benefit society, benevolent society or mutual aid association benefits. Under bankruptcy laws, these benefits are virtually always considered exempt property.

DEBIT CARD

A card issued by a bank that combines the functions of an ATM card and checks. A debit card can be used to withdraw cash at a bank like an ATM card, and it can ... (more...)
A card issued by a bank that combines the functions of an ATM card and checks. A debit card can be used to withdraw cash at a bank like an ATM card, and it can also be used at stores to pay for goods and services in place of a check. Unlike a credit card, a debit card automatically withdraws money from your checking account at the time of the transaction. Debit cards are regulated by the Electronic Funds Transfer Act.

DEFINED CONTRIBUTION PLAN

A type of pension plan that does not guarantee any particular pension amount upon retirement. Instead, the employer pays into the pension fund a certain amount ... (more...)
A type of pension plan that does not guarantee any particular pension amount upon retirement. Instead, the employer pays into the pension fund a certain amount every month, or every year, for each employee. The employer usually pays a fixed percentage of an employee's wages or salary, although sometimes the amount is a fraction of the company's profits, with the size of each employee's pension share depending on the amount of wage or salary. Upon retirement, each employee's pension is determined by how much was contributed to the fund on behalf of that employee over the years, plus whatever earnings that money has accumulated as part of the investments of the entire pension fund.