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Starke Divorce & Family Law Lawyer, Florida


Christian A. Straile Lawyer

Christian A. Straile

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Traffic, DUI-DWI
Effective results with personal service

This trial focused practice has the goals of delivering quality legal services, providing to clients personal services while developing strong, truste... (more)

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Nicholas S. Hamm Lawyer

Nicholas S. Hamm

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Child Custody

Nick Hamm has been a practicing lawyer in Gainesville, Florida since he was admitted to practice. He has devoted his practice to representing individu... (more)

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800-960-9280

Gregory T. Buckley Lawyer

Gregory T. Buckley

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Divorce, Child Custody, Child Support, Family Law

Gregory T. Buckley has spent the last 15 years serving the people of Gainesville and the surrounding areas. A knowledgeable divorce attorney is essen... (more)

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800-284-5480

Sabina  Tomshinsky Lawyer

Sabina Tomshinsky

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Paternity, Wills & Probate, Estate Planning, Landlord-Tenant

What differentiates you from other lawyers in your community?
From your very first contact with our firm, you'll come to realize that... (more)

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800-990-2610

Justin Dillon Jacobson

Family Law, Wills, Divorce, Farms, Child Support
Status:  In Good Standing           

Robert Hill King

Family Law, Divorce, Farms, Child Support, Litigation
Status:  In Good Standing           

Kenny Leigh

Family Law, Divorce, Farms, Child Support
Status:  In Good Standing           

William Falik

Child Support, Farms, Divorce, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Nick James

Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support, Children's Rights, Farms, Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           

Brian P. North

Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support, Farms, Divorce, Domestic Violence & Neglect
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

SEPARATION

A situation in which the partners in a married couple live apart. Spouses are said to be living apart if they no longer reside in the same dwelling, even though... (more...)
A situation in which the partners in a married couple live apart. Spouses are said to be living apart if they no longer reside in the same dwelling, even though they may continue their relationship. A legal separation results when the parties separate and a court rules on the division of property, such as alimony or child support -- but does not grant a divorce.

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE

An order from a judge that directs a party to come to court and convince the judge why she shouldn't grant an action proposed by the other side or by the judge ... (more...)
An order from a judge that directs a party to come to court and convince the judge why she shouldn't grant an action proposed by the other side or by the judge on her own (sua sponte). For example, in a divorce, at the request of one parent a judge might issue an order directing the other parent to appear in court on a particular date and time to show cause why the first parent should not be given sole physical custody of the children. Although it would seem that the person receiving an order to show cause is at a procedural disadvantage--she, after all, is the one who is told to come up with a convincing reason why the judge shouldn't order something--both sides normally have an equal chance to convince the judge to rule in their favor.

DEFAULT DIVORCE

See uncontested divorce.

ADOPTION

A court procedure by which an adult becomes the legal parent of someone who is not his or her biological child. Adoption creates a parent-child relationship rec... (more...)
A court procedure by which an adult becomes the legal parent of someone who is not his or her biological child. Adoption creates a parent-child relationship recognized for all legal purposes -- including child support obligations, inheritance rights and custody.

PROVOCATION

The act of inciting another person to do a particular thing. In a fault divorce, provocation may constitute a defense to the divorce, preventing it from going t... (more...)
The act of inciting another person to do a particular thing. In a fault divorce, provocation may constitute a defense to the divorce, preventing it from going through. For example, if a wife suing for divorce claims that her husband abandoned her, the husband might defend the suit on the grounds that she provoked the abandonment by driving him out of the house.

EMANCIPATION

The act of freeing someone from restraint or bondage. For example, on January 1, 1863, slaves in the confederate states were declared free by an executive order... (more...)
The act of freeing someone from restraint or bondage. For example, on January 1, 1863, slaves in the confederate states were declared free by an executive order of President Lincoln, known as the 'Emancipation Proclamation.' After the Civil War, this emancipation was extended to the entire country and made law by the ratification of the thirteenth amendment to the Constitution. Nowadays, emancipation refers to the point at which a child is free from parental control. It occurs when the child's parents no longer perform their parental duties and surrender their rights to the care, custody and earnings of their minor child. Emancipation may be the result of a voluntary agreement between the parents and child, or it may be implied from their acts and ongoing conduct. For example, a child who leaves her parents' home and becomes entirely self-supporting without their objection is considered emancipated, while a child who goes to stay with a friend or relative and gets a part-time job is not. Emancipation may also occur when a minor child marries or enters the military.

NEXT OF KIN

The closest relatives, as defined by state law, of a deceased person. Most states recognize the spouse and the nearest blood relatives as next of kin.

CUSTODY (OF A CHILD)

The legal authority to make decisions affecting a child's interests (legal custody) and the responsibility of taking care of the child (physical custody). When ... (more...)
The legal authority to make decisions affecting a child's interests (legal custody) and the responsibility of taking care of the child (physical custody). When parents separate or divorce, one of the hardest decisions they have to make is which parent will have custody. The most common arrangement is for one parent to have custody (both physical and legal) while the other parent has a right of visitation. But it is not uncommon for the parents to share legal custody, even though one parent has physical custody. The most uncommon arrangement is for the parents to share both legal and physical custody.

CLOSE CORPORATION

A corporation owned and operated by a few individuals, often members of the same family, rather than by public shareholders. State laws permit close corporation... (more...)
A corporation owned and operated by a few individuals, often members of the same family, rather than by public shareholders. State laws permit close corporations to function more informally than regular corporations. For example, shareholders can make decisions without holding meetings of the board of directors, and can fill vacancies on the board without a vote of the shareholders.