Tallahassee Divorce & Family Law Lawyer, Florida

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John Laurance Reid Lawyer

John Laurance Reid

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Divorce & Family Law, Divorce, Child Custody, Paternity, State and Local

John Laurance Reid is a seasoned attorney with decades of legal experience and is the founder of the Law Office of John Reid PLLC. His practice encomp... (more)

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800-732-8980

Gus Vincent Soto Lawyer

Gus Vincent Soto

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Accident & Injury, Workers' Compensation, DUI-DWI, Criminal, Divorce & Family Law

Attorney Gus Soto has been practicing Criminal Law, Personal Injury Law and Worker’s Compensation Law for 35 Years. He has tried over 100 jury trial... (more)

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850-893-7252

Adrian  Middleton Lawyer

Adrian Middleton

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Divorce & Family Law, Accident & Injury, Estate, Criminal, Litigation

Adrian S. Middleton is an Associate in Middleton & Middleton’s Insurance and Administrative Law Divisions, where he focuses his practice on workers... (more)

Christopher John Karpinski Lawyer

Christopher John Karpinski

VERIFIED
Criminal, Accident & Injury, Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Divorce

Christopher practices law in Tallahassee and the surrounding areas.

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Stan M. Warden Lawyer

Stan M. Warden

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law

Stan Warden is a practicing lawyer in the state of Florida. Attorney Warden received his J.D. from the Mississippi College School of Law in 1998.

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800-691-1421

J. Randall Frier

Family Law, Bankruptcy, Business Organization, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Gail Raulerson Cheatwood

Social Security -- Disability, Family Law, Wills & Probate, Government Agencies
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Meghan Boudreau Daigle

Divorce, Family Law
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Stephen Knight

Bankruptcy & Debt, Business, Family Law, Estate
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Maggie McCall Moody

Estate Planning, Family Law, Divorce, Corporate
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LEGAL TERMS

ABANDONMENT (OF A CHILD)

A parent's failure to provide any financial assistance to or communicate with his or her child over a period of time. When this happens, a court may deem the ch... (more...)
A parent's failure to provide any financial assistance to or communicate with his or her child over a period of time. When this happens, a court may deem the child abandoned by that parent and order that person's parental rights terminated. Abandonment also describes situations in which a child is physically abandoned -- for example, left on a doorstep, delivered to a hospital or put in a trash can. Physically abandoned children are usually placed in orphanages and made available for adoption.

NO-FAULT DIVORCE

Any divorce in which the spouse who wants to split up does not have to accuse the other of wrongdoing, but can simply state that the couple no longer gets along... (more...)
Any divorce in which the spouse who wants to split up does not have to accuse the other of wrongdoing, but can simply state that the couple no longer gets along. Until no-fault divorce arrived in the 1970s, the only way a person could get a divorce was to prove that the other spouse was at fault for the marriage not working. No-fault divorces are usually granted for reasons such as incompatibility, irreconcilable differences, or irretrievable or irremediable breakdown of the marriage. Also, some states allow incurable insanity as a basis for a no-fault divorce. Compare fault divorce.

SICK LEAVE

Time off work for illness. Most employers provide for some paid sick leave, although no law requires them to do so. Under the Family and Medical Leave Act, howe... (more...)
Time off work for illness. Most employers provide for some paid sick leave, although no law requires them to do so. Under the Family and Medical Leave Act, however, a worker is guaranteed up to 12 weeks per year of unpaid leave for severe or lasting illnesses.

MEDIAN FAMILY INCOME

An annual income figure for which there are as many families with incomes below that level as there are above that level. The Census Bureau publishes median fam... (more...)
An annual income figure for which there are as many families with incomes below that level as there are above that level. The Census Bureau publishes median family income figures for each state and for different family sizes. A debtor whose current monthly income is higher than the median family income in his or her state must pass the means test in order to file for Chapter 7 bankruptcy, and must commit all disposable income to a five-year repayment plan if filing for Chapter 13 bankruptcy.

PALIMONY

A non-legal term coined by journalists to describe the division of property or alimony-like support given by one member of an unmarried couple to the other afte... (more...)
A non-legal term coined by journalists to describe the division of property or alimony-like support given by one member of an unmarried couple to the other after they break up.

PETITION (IMMIGRATION)

A formal request for a green card or a specific nonimmigrant (temporary) visa. In many cases, the petition must be filed by someone sponsoring the immigrant, su... (more...)
A formal request for a green card or a specific nonimmigrant (temporary) visa. In many cases, the petition must be filed by someone sponsoring the immigrant, such as a family member or employer. After the petition is approved, the immigrant may submit the actual visa or green card application.

CONSOLIDATED OMNIBUS BUDGET RECONCILIATION ACT (COBRA)

A federal law requiring that employers offer employees -- and their spouses and dependents -- continuing insurance coverage if their work hours are cut or they ... (more...)
A federal law requiring that employers offer employees -- and their spouses and dependents -- continuing insurance coverage if their work hours are cut or they lose their job for any reason other than gross misconduct. Courts are still in the process of determining the meaning of gross misconduct, but it's clearly more serious than poor performance or judgment. COBRA also makes an ex-spouse and children eligible to receive group rate health insurance provided by the other ex-spouse's employer for three years following a divorce.

DILUTION

A situation in which a famous trademark or service mark is used in a context in which the mark's reputation for quality is tarnished or its distinction is blurr... (more...)
A situation in which a famous trademark or service mark is used in a context in which the mark's reputation for quality is tarnished or its distinction is blurred. In this case, trademark infringement exists even though there is no likelihood of customer confusion, which is usually required in cases of trademark infringement. For example, the use of the word Candyland for a pornographic site on the Internet was ruled to dilute the reputation of the Candyland mark for the well-known children's game, even though the traditional basis for trademark infringement (probable customer confusion) wasn't an issue.

IRRECONCILABLE DIFFERENCES

Differences between spouses that are considered sufficiently severe to make married life together more or less impossible. In a number of states, irreconcilable... (more...)
Differences between spouses that are considered sufficiently severe to make married life together more or less impossible. In a number of states, irreconcilable differences is the accepted ground for a no-fault divorce. As a practical matter, courts seldom, if ever, inquire into what the differences actually are, and routinely grant a divorce as long as the party seeking the divorce says the couple has irreconcilable differences. Compare incompatibility; irremediable breakdown.

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