Tallahassee Family Law Lawyer, Florida

Sponsored Law Firm


Includes: Collaborative Law, Domestic Violence & Neglect, Paternity, Prenuptial Agreements

J. Randall Frier

Family Law, Bankruptcy, Business Organization, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Gail Raulerson Cheatwood

Social Security -- Disability, Family Law, Wills & Probate, Government Agencies
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Meghan Boudreau Daigle

Divorce, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Stephen Knight

Bankruptcy & Debt, Business, Family Law, Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT
Speak with Lawyer.com

Maggie McCall Moody

Estate Planning, Family Law, Divorce, Corporate
Status:  In Good Standing           

John C. Kenny

Family Law, Divorce, Child Support, DUI-DWI
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  26 Years

Odell Marion Stroud

Family Law, Criminal, Civil Rights, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  8 Years

Jennifer Leigh Sweeting

Mediation, Dispute Resolution, Trusts, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  17 Years

Christopher Bruce Norris

Trusts, Family Law, Criminal, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  16 Years

Jerome M Novey

Family Law, Divorce & Family Law, Credit & Debt
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  50 Years

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.


Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

TIPS

Easily find Tallahassee Family Law Lawyers and Tallahassee Family Law Firms. For more attorneys, search all Divorce & Family Law areas including Adoption, Child Custody, Child Support and Divorce attorneys.

LEGAL TERMS

DIVORCE AGREEMENT

An agreement made by a divorcing couple regarding the division of property, custody and visitation of the children, alimony or child support. The agreement must... (more...)
An agreement made by a divorcing couple regarding the division of property, custody and visitation of the children, alimony or child support. The agreement must be put in writing, signed by the parties and accepted by the court. It becomes part of the divorce decree and does away with the necessity of having a trial on the issues covered by the agreement. A divorce agreement may also be called a marital settlement agreement, marital termination agreement or settlement agreement.

VISITATION RIGHTS

The right to see a child regularly, typically awarded by the court to the parent who does not have physical custody of the child. The court will deny visitation... (more...)
The right to see a child regularly, typically awarded by the court to the parent who does not have physical custody of the child. The court will deny visitation rights only if it decides that visitation would hurt the child so much that the parent should be kept away.

MARRIAGE LICENSE

A document that authorizes a couple to get married, usually available from the county clerk's office in the state where the marriage will take place. Couples pa... (more...)
A document that authorizes a couple to get married, usually available from the county clerk's office in the state where the marriage will take place. Couples pay a small fee for a marriage license, and must often wait a few days before it is issued. In addition, a few states require a short waiting period--usually not more than a day--between the time the license is issued and the time the marriage may take place. And some states still require blood tests for couples before they will issue a marriage license, though most no longer do.

GUARDIAN AD LITEM

A person, not necessarily a lawyer, who is appointed by a court to represent and protect the interests of a child or an incapacitated adult during a lawsuit. Fo... (more...)
A person, not necessarily a lawyer, who is appointed by a court to represent and protect the interests of a child or an incapacitated adult during a lawsuit. For example, a guardian ad litem (GAL) may be appointed to represent the interests of a child whose parents are locked in a contentious battle for custody, or to protect a child's interests in a lawsuit where there are allegations of child abuse. The GAL may conduct interviews and investigations, make reports to the court and participate in court hearings or mediation sessions. Sometimes called court-appointed special advocates (CASAs).

DESERTION

The voluntary abandonment of one spouse by the other, without the abandoned spouse's consent. Commonly, desertion occurs when a spouse leaves the marital home f... (more...)
The voluntary abandonment of one spouse by the other, without the abandoned spouse's consent. Commonly, desertion occurs when a spouse leaves the marital home for a specified length of time. Desertion is a grounds for divorce in states with fault divorce.

STEPCHILD

A child born to your spouse before your marriage whom you have not legally adopted. If you adopt the child, he or she is legally treated just like a biological ... (more...)
A child born to your spouse before your marriage whom you have not legally adopted. If you adopt the child, he or she is legally treated just like a biological offspring. Under the Uniform Probate Code, followed in some states, a stepchild belongs in the same class as a biological child and will inherit property left 'to my children.' In other states, a stepchild is not treated like a biological child unless he or she can prove that the parental relationship was established when he or she was a minor and that adoption would have occurred but for some legal obstacle.

MARRIAGE

The legal union of two people. Once a couple is married, their rights and responsibilities toward one another concerning property and support are defined by the... (more...)
The legal union of two people. Once a couple is married, their rights and responsibilities toward one another concerning property and support are defined by the laws of the state in which they live. A marriage can only be terminated by a court granting a divorce or annulment. Compare common law marriage.

AGE OF MAJORITY

Adulthood in the eyes of the law. After reaching the age of majority, a person is permitted to vote, make a valid will, enter into binding contracts, enlist in ... (more...)
Adulthood in the eyes of the law. After reaching the age of majority, a person is permitted to vote, make a valid will, enter into binding contracts, enlist in the armed forces and purchase alcohol. Also, parents may stop making child support payments when a child reaches the age of majority. In most states the age of majority is 18, but this varies depending on the activity. For example, in some states people are allowed to vote when they reach the age of eighteen, but can't purchase alcohol until they're 21.

IRRECONCILABLE DIFFERENCES

Differences between spouses that are considered sufficiently severe to make married life together more or less impossible. In a number of states, irreconcilable... (more...)
Differences between spouses that are considered sufficiently severe to make married life together more or less impossible. In a number of states, irreconcilable differences is the accepted ground for a no-fault divorce. As a practical matter, courts seldom, if ever, inquire into what the differences actually are, and routinely grant a divorce as long as the party seeking the divorce says the couple has irreconcilable differences. Compare incompatibility; irremediable breakdown.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

In re Amendments to Florida Family Law Rules

The relevant legislation, chapter 2008-61, Laws of Florida, amended various sections of Chapter 61, Florida Statutes, and related statutes, to remove the references to "custody," "primary residential parent," "secondary residential parent," and "visitation." The statutes now require the court ...

AMENDMENTS TO APPROVED FAMILY LAW FORMS

During the 2008 legislative session, the Legislature amended numerous sections of chapter 61, Florida Statutes, redesignating it "Dissolution of Marriage; Support; Time-sharing," and amended various sections of chapters 409, 414, 445, 741, 742, 753, and 827, Florida Statutes. See ...

IN RE AMENDMENTS TO FL. FAMILY LAW RULES OF PROCEDURE

The Florida Bar's Family Law Rules Committee (Committee) has filed a "Fast-Track Report to Implement 2008 Legislative Changes to Equitable Distribution." The Committee proposes amendments to the Florida Family Law Rules of Procedure that conform the rules and forms to recent ...