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Aaron N. Freedman Lawyer

Aaron N. Freedman

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Criminal, DUI-DWI, Felony, Misdemeanor, Personal Injury

Aaron N. Freedman received his B.A. in Arts Management, a dual degree in business and music from Newberry College, a private Liberal Arts school in 20... (more)

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William C. Head Lawyer

William C. Head

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DUI-DWI, Misdemeanor, Car Accident, Felony, Administrative Law
Criminal defense attorney and Atlanta DUI Lawyer with top lawyer ratings

William C. Head is Board Certified in DUI - criminal defense by NCDD.com. He is known to his friends as Bubba. He started the first Internet Directo... (more)

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404-567-5515

Cory  Yager Lawyer

Cory Yager

Criminal, DUI-DWI, Misdemeanor, Felony, Juvenile Law

Cory Yager is a lawyer in Atlanta who focuses on Juvenile Crimes cases. He has tried cases involving expungement, traffic violations, solicitation, DU... (more)

Carol S. Baskin Lawyer

Carol S. Baskin

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Divorce & Family Law, Bankruptcy, Estate, Juvenile Law, Misdemeanor

Carol Baskin started practicing family law because she wanted to protect the relationships of families in Georgia. Baskin & Baskin, LLC was founded in... (more)

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Lawrence Abram Kohn Lawyer

Lawrence Abram Kohn

Criminal, DUI-DWI, Misdemeanor, Juvenile Law, Traffic

Lawrence Kohn is a lawyer in Marietta who focuses on Assault cases. He has tried cases involving conspiracy, domestic violence, DUI, expungement, gun ... (more)

M. Byron Morgan Lawyer

M. Byron Morgan

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Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Accident & Injury, Felony, Misdemeanor

Byron has been practicing criminal defense and family law for over 28 years. Look at his website at www.byronthelawyer.com. Byron constantly has cli... (more)

Richard D. C. Schrade Lawyer

Richard D. C. Schrade

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Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, DUI-DWI, Misdemeanor

Richard is an experienced criminal lawyer who will help you navigate the complexities of your case. Clients consistently rave about Richard Schrade’... (more)

James Lawrence Yeargan

Misdemeanor, Felony, DUI-DWI, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  16 Years

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Thurston Lopes

Criminal, DUI-DWI, Felony, Misdemeanor
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  24 Years

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T. Kevin Mooney

Criminal, DUI-DWI, Felony, Misdemeanor
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  28 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

MISDEMEANOR

A crime, less serious than a felony, punishable by no more than one year in jail. Petty theft (of articles worth less than a certain amount), first-time drunk d... (more...)
A crime, less serious than a felony, punishable by no more than one year in jail. Petty theft (of articles worth less than a certain amount), first-time drunk driving and leaving the scene of an accident are all common misdemeanors.

SELF-INCRIMINATION

The making of statements that might expose you to criminal prosecution, either now or in the future. The 5th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution prohibits the go... (more...)
The making of statements that might expose you to criminal prosecution, either now or in the future. The 5th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution prohibits the government from forcing you to provide evidence (as in answering questions) that would or might lead to your prosecution for a crime.

DISCOVERY

A formal investigation -- governed by court rules -- that is conducted before trial. Discovery allows one party to question other parties, and sometimes witness... (more...)
A formal investigation -- governed by court rules -- that is conducted before trial. Discovery allows one party to question other parties, and sometimes witnesses. It also allows one party to force the others to produce requested documents or other physical evidence. The most common types of discovery are interrogatories, consisting of written questions the other party must answer under penalty of perjury, and depositions, which involve an in-person session at which one party to a lawsuit has the opportunity to ask oral questions of the other party or her witnesses under oath while a written transcript is made by a court reporter. Other types of pretrial discovery consist of written requests to produce documents and requests for admissions, by which one party asks the other to admit or deny key facts in the case. One major purpose of discovery is to assess the strength or weakness of an opponent's case, with the idea of opening settlement talks. Another is to gather information to use at trial. Discovery is also present in criminal cases, in which by law the prosecutor must turn over to the defense any witness statements and any evidence that might tend to exonerate the defendant. Depending on the rules of the court, the defendant may also be obliged to share evidence with the prosecutor.

PLEA

The defendant's formal answer to criminal charges. Typically defendants enter one of the following pleas: guilty, not guilty or nolo contendere. A plea is usual... (more...)
The defendant's formal answer to criminal charges. Typically defendants enter one of the following pleas: guilty, not guilty or nolo contendere. A plea is usually entered when charges are formally brought (at arraignment).

JUSTICE SYSTEM

A term lawyers use to describe the courts and other bureaucracies that handle American's criminal legal business, including offices of various state and federal... (more...)
A term lawyers use to describe the courts and other bureaucracies that handle American's criminal legal business, including offices of various state and federal prosecutors and public defenders. Many people caught up in this system refer to it by less flattering names.

HUNG JURY

A jury unable to come to a final decision, resulting in a mistrial. Judges do their best to avoid hung juries, typically sending juries back into deliberations ... (more...)
A jury unable to come to a final decision, resulting in a mistrial. Judges do their best to avoid hung juries, typically sending juries back into deliberations with an assurance (sometimes known as a 'dynamite charge') that they will be able to reach a decision if they try harder. If a mistrial is declared, the case is tried again unless the parties settle the case (in a civil case) or the prosecution dismisses the charges or offers a plea bargain (in a criminal case).

CRIMINAL INSANITY

A mental defect or disease that makes it impossible for a person to understand the wrongfulness of his acts or, even if he understands them, to ditinguish right... (more...)
A mental defect or disease that makes it impossible for a person to understand the wrongfulness of his acts or, even if he understands them, to ditinguish right from wrong. Defendants who are criminally insane cannot be convicted of a crime, since criminal conduct involves the conscious intent to do wrong -- a choice that the criminally insane cannot meaningfully make. See also irresistible impulse; McNaghten Rule.

HOMICIDE

The killing of one human being by the act or omission of another. The term applies to all such killings, whether criminal or not. Homicide is considered noncrim... (more...)
The killing of one human being by the act or omission of another. The term applies to all such killings, whether criminal or not. Homicide is considered noncriminal in a number of situations, including deaths as the result of war and putting someone to death by the valid sentence of a court. Killing may also be legally justified or excused, as it is in cases of self-defense or when someone is killed by another person who is attempting to prevent a violent felony. Criminal homicide occurs when a person purposely, knowingly, recklessly or negligently causes the death of another. Murder and manslaughter are both examples of criminal homicide.

PROBABLE CAUSE

The amount and quality of information police must have before they can arrest or search without a warrant or that a judge must have before she will sign a searc... (more...)
The amount and quality of information police must have before they can arrest or search without a warrant or that a judge must have before she will sign a search warrant allowing the police to conduct a search or arrest a suspect. Reliable information must show that it's more likely than not that a crime has occurred and the suspect is involved.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Clements v. State

... Following a jury trial, Belinda Clements appeals her conviction of theft by shoplifting (felony), [1] arguing that the trial court erred in precluding her from impeaching a State witness with a prior misdemeanor conviction for theft by conversion, and in denying her motion for new trial ...

Stryker v. State

... ADAMS, Judge. Patrick Stryker appeals from his conviction in a bench trial of the misdemeanor offense of obstruction of an officer. We affirm. ... 507, 512(3) (1871). But these cases have no application here because force is no longer an element of misdemeanor obstruction. ...

In re DH

... any person who is charged with possession of marijuana, which possession is of one ounce or less, shall be guilty of a misdemeanor and punished by imprisonment for a period not to exceed 12 months or a fine not to exceed $1,000.00, or both, or public works not to exceed 12 ...