Gulfport Estate Planning Lawyer, Mississippi


Includes: Gift Taxation

James C. Simpson

Business Organization, Family Law, Corporate, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  41 Years

Jason Brooks Purvis

Personal Injury, State Government, Commercial Real Estate, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  18 Years

James L. Davis

Litigation, Estate Planning, Family Law, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  37 Years

Paul M Newton

Tax, Estate, Estate Planning, Business
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  70 Years
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Jason E Graeber

Estate Planning, Real Estate Other, Transactions
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  18 Years

Lawrence C Corban

Private Schools, Wills & Probate, Estate Planning, Banking & Finance
Status:  In Good Standing           

George R Huffman

Tax, Real Estate, Estate Planning, Business & Trade
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  17 Years

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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Easily find Gulfport Estate Planning Lawyers and Gulfport Estate Planning Law Firms. For more attorneys, search all Estate areas including Trusts, Wills & Probate and Power of Attorney attorneys.

LEGAL TERMS

CURATOR

See conservator.

DOWER AND CURTESY

A surviving spouse's right to receive a set portion of the deceased spouse's estate -- usually one-third to one-half. Dower (not to be confused with a 'dowry') ... (more...)
A surviving spouse's right to receive a set portion of the deceased spouse's estate -- usually one-third to one-half. Dower (not to be confused with a 'dowry') refers to the portion to which a surviving wife is entitled, while curtesy refers to what a man may claim. Until recently, these amounts differed in a number of states. However, because discrimination on the basis of sex is now illegal in most cases, most states have abolished dower and curtesy and generally provide the same benefits regardless of sex -- and this amount is often known simply as the statutory share. Under certain circumstances, a living spouse may not be able to sell or convey property that is subject to the other spouse's dower and curtesy or statutory share rights.

PROPERTY CONTROL TRUST

Any trust that imposes limits or controls over the rights of trust beneficiaries. These trusts include (1) special needs trusts designed to assist people who ha... (more...)
Any trust that imposes limits or controls over the rights of trust beneficiaries. These trusts include (1) special needs trusts designed to assist people who have special physical, emotional or other requirements, (2) spendthrift trusts designed to prevent a beneficiary from wasting the trust principal; and (3) sprinkling trusts that allow the trustee to decide how to distribute trust income or principal among the beneficiaries.

GENERATION-SKIPPING TRUST

A trust designed to save on estate tax. The trust principal is preserved for the trust maker's grandchildren, with his or her children receiving only income fro... (more...)
A trust designed to save on estate tax. The trust principal is preserved for the trust maker's grandchildren, with his or her children receiving only income from the trust. Because the children (the middle generation) never legally own the property, it isn't subject to estate tax at their death. See generation-skipping transfer tax.

DISTRIBUTEE

(1) Anyone who receives something. Usually, the term refers to someone who inherits a deceased person's property. If the deceased person dies without a will (ca... (more...)
(1) Anyone who receives something. Usually, the term refers to someone who inherits a deceased person's property. If the deceased person dies without a will (called intestate), state law determines what each distributee will receive. Also called a beneficiary.

FAMILY POT TRUST

See pot trust.

INTESTATE SUCCESSION

The method by which property is distributed when a person dies without a valid will. Each state's law provides that the property be distributed to the closest s... (more...)
The method by which property is distributed when a person dies without a valid will. Each state's law provides that the property be distributed to the closest surviving relatives. In most states, the surviving spouse, children, parents, siblings, nieces and nephews, and next of kin inherit, in that order.

CONTINGENT BENEFICIARY

1) An alternate beneficiary named in a will, trust or other document. 2) Any person entitled to property under a will if one or more prior conditions are satisf... (more...)
1) An alternate beneficiary named in a will, trust or other document. 2) Any person entitled to property under a will if one or more prior conditions are satisfied. For example, if Fred is entitled to take property under a will only if he's married at the time of the will maker's death, Fred is a contingent beneficiary. Similarly, if Ellen is named to receive a house only in the event her mother, who has been named to live in the house, moves out of it, Ellen is a contingent beneficiary.

SELF-PROVING WILL

A will that is created in a way that allows a probate court to easily accept it as the true will of the person who has died. In most states, a will is self-prov... (more...)
A will that is created in a way that allows a probate court to easily accept it as the true will of the person who has died. In most states, a will is self-proving when two witnesses sign under penalty of perjury that they observed the willmaker sign it and that he told them it was his will. If no one contests the validity of the will, the probate court will accept the will without hearing the testimony of the witnesses or other evidence. To make a self-proving will in other states, the willmaker and one or more witnesses must sign an affidavit (sworn statement) before a notary public certifying that the will is genuine and that all willmaking formalities have been observed.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

IN RE COMMISSION ON MANDATORY CONTINUING LEGAL EDUCATION

... Tennessee Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers. Tennessee Trial Lawyers Association. The National Center for Justice and the Rule of Law. The Southern California Tax & Estate Planning Forum. The Southern Trust School (Alabama). Transportation Lawyers Association. ...

Howell v. May

... On April 11, 2000, Sharnee drove Ann to Hannaford's office. Sharnee and Ann met with Hannaford and, as a result of that meeting, Hannaford prepared some estate planning documents for Ann. ¶ 6. Two days later, Sharnee again drove Ann to Hannaford's office. ...

Daly v. Mississippi Bar

... Attachments to the petition and sixth supplemental petition documented his completion of continuing legal education in areas including estate planning and tax law. The Bar does not dispute that Daly has met this requirement. ...