Saint Joseph Trusts Lawyer, Missouri, page 2


Jack Duncan Mcinnes V

Accident & Injury, Franchising, Energy, Trusts
Status:  In Good Standing           

Gary K. Patton

Civil Rights, Adoption, Trusts, Business
Status:  In Good Standing           

Michael Brett Fulkerson

Elder Law, Trusts, Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  23 Years

Pamela L. Cone

Elder Law, Estate Planning, Business, Commercial Real Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  35 Years
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David L. Bolander

Estate Planning, Child Custody, Adoption, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Nicholas Kennon Robb

Accident & Injury, Estate, Lawsuit & Dispute, Real Estate, Car Accident
Status:  In Good Standing           

James H. Counts

Construction, Communication & Media Law, Estate Planning, Corporate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Stephen J. Briggs

Education, Litigation, Estate Planning, Corporate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Nancy Irene Potter

Real Estate, Government, Estate, Accident & Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  13 Years

Joshua Michael Emberton

Real Estate, Lawsuit & Dispute, Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  7 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

CURATOR

See conservator.

NET ESTATE

The value of all property owned at death less liabilities or debts.

PROPERTY CONTROL TRUST

Any trust that imposes limits or controls over the rights of trust beneficiaries. These trusts include (1) special needs trusts designed to assist people who ha... (more...)
Any trust that imposes limits or controls over the rights of trust beneficiaries. These trusts include (1) special needs trusts designed to assist people who have special physical, emotional or other requirements, (2) spendthrift trusts designed to prevent a beneficiary from wasting the trust principal; and (3) sprinkling trusts that allow the trustee to decide how to distribute trust income or principal among the beneficiaries.

GENERATION-SKIPPING TRUST

A trust designed to save on estate tax. The trust principal is preserved for the trust maker's grandchildren, with his or her children receiving only income fro... (more...)
A trust designed to save on estate tax. The trust principal is preserved for the trust maker's grandchildren, with his or her children receiving only income from the trust. Because the children (the middle generation) never legally own the property, it isn't subject to estate tax at their death. See generation-skipping transfer tax.

ADEMPTION

The failure of a bequest of property in a will. The gift fails (is 'adeemed') because the person who made the will no longer owns the property when he or she di... (more...)
The failure of a bequest of property in a will. The gift fails (is 'adeemed') because the person who made the will no longer owns the property when he or she dies. Often this happens because the property has been sold, destroyed or given away to someone other than the beneficiary named in the will. A bequest may also be adeemed when the will maker, while still living, gives the property to the intended beneficiary (called 'ademption by satisfaction'). When a bequest is adeemed, the beneficiary named in the will is out of luck; he or she doesn't get cash or a different item of property to replace the one that was described in the will. For example, Mark writes in his will, 'I leave to Rob the family vehicle,' but then trades in his car in for a jet ski. When Mark dies, Rob will receive nothing. Frustrated beneficiaries may challenge an ademption in court, especially if the property was not clearly identified in the first place.

SUMMARY PROBATE

A relatively simple probate proceeding available for 'small estates,' as that term is defined by state law. Every state's definition is different, and many are ... (more...)
A relatively simple probate proceeding available for 'small estates,' as that term is defined by state law. Every state's definition is different, and many are complicated, but a few examples include estates worth up to $100,000 in California; New York estates where property, excluding real estate and amounts that must be set aside for surviving family members, is worth $20,000 or less; and Texas estates where the value of property doesn't exceed what is needed to pay a family allowance and certain creditors.

ADMINISTRATOR

A person appointed by a probate court to handle the distribution of property of someone who has died without a will, or with a will that fails to name someone t... (more...)
A person appointed by a probate court to handle the distribution of property of someone who has died without a will, or with a will that fails to name someone to carry out this task. administrator ad litem A person appointed by a probate court to represent an estate during a lawsuit. (Ad litem is Latin for 'during the litigation.') An administrator ad litem is appointed only if there is no existing executor or administrator of the estate, or if the executor or administrator has conflicting interests. For example, Jerry's will leaves most of his property to his brother, Jeff, and also names Jeff as executor of the will. But Jerry's sister, Janine, feels that Jerry made the will under improper pressure from Jeff, and brings a lawsuit to challenge it. The court appoints an administrator ad litem to represent Jerry's estate while the lawsuit is in progress. Also known as administrator ad prosequendum, meaning administrator 'during the prosecution.' administrator ad prosequendum See administrator ad litem.administrator cum testamento annexo See administrator with will annexed. administrator de bonis non (DBN) Latin for 'administrator of goods not administered.' This term refers to the person appointed by a probate court to finish probate proceedings when the executor or previous administrator can't finish the job.administrator de bonis non cum testamento annexo (DBNCTA) A baffling title for an administrator appointed by a probate court to take over probate proceedings when the named executor dies, leaving the job unfinished.administrator pendente lite Latin for 'administrator pending litigation.' This term refers to the person appointed by a court to begin probate proceedings during a lawsuit that challenges the will. The administrator pendente lite takes an inventory of the deceased person's property and handles the business affairs of the estate until the dispute is settled. Also called a special administrator.administrator with will annexed An administrator who takes the place of an executor under a will. The administrator steps in either when a will fails to nominate an executor or the named executor is unable to serve. Also called administrator cum testamento annexo or CTA, the Latin version of 'with the will annexed.'

GRANTOR RETAINED INCOME TRUST

Irrevocable trusts designed to save on estate tax. There are several kinds; with all of them, you keep income from trust property, or use of that property, for ... (more...)
Irrevocable trusts designed to save on estate tax. There are several kinds; with all of them, you keep income from trust property, or use of that property, for a period of years. When the trust ends, the property goes to the final beneficiaries you've named. These trusts are for people who have enough wealth to feel comfortable giving away a substantial hunk of property. They come in three flavors: Grantor-Retained Annuity Trusts (GRATs), Grantor-Retained Unitrusts (GRUTs) and Grantor-Retained Income Trusts (GRITs).

DISINHERIT

To deliberately prevent someone from inheriting something. This is usually done by a provision in a will stating that someone who would ordinarily inherit prope... (more...)
To deliberately prevent someone from inheriting something. This is usually done by a provision in a will stating that someone who would ordinarily inherit property -- a close family member, for example -- should not receive it. In most states, you cannot completely disinherit your spouse; a surviving spouse has the right to claim a portion (usually one-third to one-half) of the deceased spouse's estate. With a few exceptions, however, you can expressly disinherit children.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Wilson v. Rhodes

... 875 JEFFREY W. BATES, Chief Judge. The trial court granted a summary judgment requiring the successor trustees of two trusts to distribute certain assets to the personal representative of a decedent's estate. ... In September 1992, Husband and Wife established individual trusts. ...

Hardt v. Vitae Foundation, Inc.

... This rule applied to gifts both to charitable trusts and charitable corporations and was made primarily to prevent potential beneficiaries without a "special interest" in the gift from "vex[ing]" public charities with "frequent suits, possibly based on an inadequate investigation." Id. ...

Schumacher v. Schumacher

... Upon Grantor's death in May of 1998, the revocable trust split into three separate trusts: a qualified terminable interest property trust ("QTIP trust"), a marital trust, and a family trust. Topper is the sole trustee of the three trusts. ...