Scotland White Collar Crime Lawyer, Texas

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Rick L. Mahler Lawyer

Rick L. Mahler

Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Wills & Probate, Power of Attorney
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Rick Mahler is a practicing lawyer in the state of Texas.

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800-957-6511

David Adrian Levy

Government, Criminal, Administrative Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  26 Years

Robert B. Morris

Commercial Real Estate, Litigation, Oil & Gas, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  29 Years

Mark Richard Briley

Estate, Criminal, Accident & Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  11 Years
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Cyndi Schenk

Wills, Family Law, Criminal, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  32 Years

Michael F. Payne

Commercial Real Estate, Real Estate, Family Law, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  42 Years

Spencer Rowley

Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  21 Years

Dean A. Sanders

Family Law, Divorce, Criminal, Children's Rights
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  40 Years

Kimberley Catherine Latham

Family Law, Criminal, Credit & Debt, Consumer Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  17 Years

Benjamin Edwin Hoover

Workers' Compensation, Criminal, Personal Injury, Accident & Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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LEGAL TERMS

ACCOMPLICE

Someone who helps another person (known as the principal) commit a crime. Unlike an accessory, an accomplice is usually present when the crime is committed. An ... (more...)
Someone who helps another person (known as the principal) commit a crime. Unlike an accessory, an accomplice is usually present when the crime is committed. An accomplice is guilty of the same offense and usually receives the same sentence as the principal. For instance, the driver of the getaway car for a burglary is an accomplice and will be guilty of the burglary even though he may not have entered the building.

EXCLUSIONARY RULE

A rule of evidence that disallows the use of illegally obtained evidence in criminal trials. For example, the exclusionary rule would prevent a prosecutor from ... (more...)
A rule of evidence that disallows the use of illegally obtained evidence in criminal trials. For example, the exclusionary rule would prevent a prosecutor from introducing at trial evidence seized during an illegal search.

PROSECUTOR

A lawyer who works for the local, state or federal government to bring and litigate criminal cases.

BAILOR

Someone who delivers an item of personal property to another person for a specific purpose. For example, a person who leaves a broken VCR with a repairman in or... (more...)
Someone who delivers an item of personal property to another person for a specific purpose. For example, a person who leaves a broken VCR with a repairman in order to get it fixed would be a bailor.

CIRCUMSTANTIAL EVIDENCE

Evidence that proves a fact by means of an inference. For example, from the evidence that a person was seen running away from the scene of a crime, a judge or j... (more...)
Evidence that proves a fact by means of an inference. For example, from the evidence that a person was seen running away from the scene of a crime, a judge or jury may infer that the person committed the crime.

OWN RECOGNIZANCE (OR)

A way the defendant can get out of jail, without paying bail, by promising to appear in court when next required to be there. Sometimes called 'personal recogni... (more...)
A way the defendant can get out of jail, without paying bail, by promising to appear in court when next required to be there. Sometimes called 'personal recognizance.' Only those with strong ties to the community, such as a steady job, local family and no history of failing to appear in court, are good candidates for 'OR' release. If the charge is very serious, however, OR may not be an option.

IMPEACH

(1) To discredit. To impeach a witness' credibility, for example, is to show that the witness is not believable. A witness may be impeached by showing that he h... (more...)
(1) To discredit. To impeach a witness' credibility, for example, is to show that the witness is not believable. A witness may be impeached by showing that he has made statements that are inconsistent with his present testimony, or that he has a reputation for not being a truthful person. (2) The process of charging a public official, such as the President or a federal judge, with a crime or misconduct and removing the official from office.

EAVESDROPPING

Listening to conversations or observing conduct which is meant to be private, typically by using devices that amplify sound or light, such as stethoscopes or bi... (more...)
Listening to conversations or observing conduct which is meant to be private, typically by using devices that amplify sound or light, such as stethoscopes or binoculars. The term comes from the common law offense of listening to private conversations by crouching under the windows or eaves of a house. Nowadays, eavesdropping includes using electronic equipment to intercept telephone or other wire communications, or radio equipment to intercept broadcast communications. Generally, the term 'eavesdropping' is used when the activity is not legally authorized by a search warrant or court order; and the term 'surveillance' is used when the activity is permitted by law. Compare electronic surveillance.

CIVIL

Noncriminal. See civil case.