Children’s Bill of Rights In Divorce

by Kelli Martone on Mar. 31, 2019

Divorce & Family Law 

Summary: Children’s Rights During Divorce

We the children of divorcing parents, in order to form a more perfect union, establish justice, insure domestic tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the general welfare, and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity, do ordain and establish these Bill Of Rights for all children.

  1. The right not to be asked or expected to choose sides or be put in a situation where I would have to take one parent’s side against the other.
  2. The right to be treated as a person and not as a pawn, possession or negotiating chip.
  3. The right to freely and privately communicate with both parents.
  4. The right not to be asked questions by one parent about the other.
  5. The right to not be a messenger.
  6. The right to express my feelings.
  7. The right to ample visitation with the non-custodial parent which will best serve my needs and wishes.
  8. The right to love and have a relationship with both parents equally, without being made to feel guilty.
  9. The right to not hear either parent say anything bad about the other.
  10. The right to the same educational opportunities and economic support, if at all possible that I would have had if my parents did not divorce.
  11. The right to have what is in my best interest protected at all times.
  12. The right to maintain my status as a child and not be expected to take on adult responsibilities for the sake of the parent’s well-being.
  13. The right to request my parents seek appropriate emotional and social support for me and them when needed.
  14. The right to expect consistent parenting at a time when little in my life seems constant or secure.
  15. The right to expect healthy relationship modeling, despite the recent events.

Legal Articles Additional Disclaimer

Lawyer.com is not a law firm and does not offer legal advice. Content posted on Lawyer.com is the sole responsibility of the person from whom such content originated and is not reviewed or commented on by Lawyer.com. The application of law to any set of facts is a highly specialized skill, practiced by lawyers and often dependent on jurisdiction. Content on the site of a legal nature may or may not be accurate for a particular state or jurisdiction and may largely depend on specific circumstances surrounding individual cases, which may or may not be consistent with your circumstances or may no longer be up-to-date to the extent that laws have changed since posting. Legal articles therefore are for review as general research and for use in helping to gauge a lawyer's expertise on a matter. If you are seeking specific legal advice, Lawyer.com recommends that you contact a lawyer to review your specific issues. See Lawyer.com's full Terms of Use for more information.